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Tim Connolly [6]Timothy Connolly [1]
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Profile: Tim Connolly
Profile: Tim Connolly (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)
  1. Tim Connolly (forthcoming). Ethics of Compassion: Buddhist Karuṇā and Confucian Ren. In Ithamar Theodor Zhihua Yao (ed.), Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion. Lexington Books.
  2. Tim Connolly (2013). Sagehood and Supererogation in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (2):269-286.
    The Confucian ethical tradition emphasizes unceasing progress toward the goal of sagehood, and so it is generally opposed to the idea of supererogation, as this implies that we may be satisfied with attaining some sub-sagely level of morality. The one possible exception to this anti-supererogationist stance, however, turns out to be Confucius himself, who in the Analects appears to downplay sagehood and instead focus on the goal of junzi. Yet given that Confucius stresses ceaseless cultivation as much as anyone else (...)
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  3. Timothy Connolly (2013). Introduction: Chinese Philosophy Qua Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):377-380.
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  4. Ram Nath Jha, Sophia Katz, Friederike Assandri, Nicholas F. Gier, Alexus McLeod, Tim Connolly, Yong Huang, Livia Kohn, Wei Zhang, Joshua Capitanio, Guang Xing, Bill M. Mak, John M. Thompson, Carl Olson & Gad C. Isay (2013). Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion. Lexington Books.
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  5. Tim Connolly (2012). Friendship and Filial Piety: Relational Ethics in Aristotle and Early Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):71-88.
    This article examines the origins of and philosophical justifications for Aristotelian friendship (philia) and early Confucian filial piety (xiao). What underlying assumptions about bonds between friends and family members do the philosophies share or uniquely possess? Is the Aristotelian emphasis on relationships between equals incompatible with the Confucian regard for filiality? As I argue, the Aristotelian and early Confucian accounts, while different in focus, share many of the same tensions in the attempt to balance hierarchical and familial associations with those (...)
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  6. Tim Connolly (2012). Learning Chinese Philosophy with Commentaries. Teaching Philosophy 35 (1):1-18.
    The last two decades have seen a resurgence of interest in the study of classical Chinese texts by means of the subsequent commentaries. New versions of works like the Analects and Mencius that include selected commentaries have begun to appear, making some view about the value of commentaries necessary simply for picking which edition of a text to read. In this paper, I consider the potential role of the 2000-year-old commentarial tradition in the teaching and learning of Chinese philosophy. Given (...)
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  7. Tim Connolly (2011). Perspectivism as a Way of Knowing in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):487-505.
    A perspectivist theory is usually taken to mean that (1) our knowledge of the world is inevitably shaped by our particular perspectives, (2) any one of these perspectives is as good as any other, and (3) any claims to objective or authoritative knowledge are consequently without ground. Recent scholarship on Nietzsche, however, has challenged the prevalent view that the philosopher holds (2) and (3), arguing instead that his perspectivism aims at attaining a greater level of objectivity. In this essay, I (...)
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