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Tim Mulgan [42]Timothy Mulgan [3]
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Profile: Tim Mulgan (University of Auckland)
  1. Tim Mulgan (forthcoming). A Précis to Ethics for a Broken World. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  2. Tim Mulgan (forthcoming). Replies to Critics. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  3. Tim Mulgan (2014). Ethics for Possible Futures. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (1pt1):57-73.
    I explore the moral implications of four possible futures: a broken future where our affluent way of life is no longer available; a virtual future where human beings spend their entire lives in Nozick's experience machine; a digital future where humans have been replaced by unconscious digital beings; and a theological future where the existence of God has been proved. These futures affect our current ethical thinking in surprising ways. They raise the importance of intergenerational ethics, alter the balance between (...)
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  4. Tim Mulgan (2014). Understanding Utilitarianism. Routledge.
    Utilitarianism - a philosophy based on the principle of the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people - has been hugely influential over the past two centuries. Beyond ethics or morality, utilitarian assumptions and arguments abound in modern economic and political life, especially in public policy. An understanding of utilitarianism is indeed essential to any understanding of contemporary society. "Understanding Utilitarianism" presents utilitarianism very much as a living tradition. The book begins with a summary of the classical utilitarianism of (...)
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  5. Tim Mulgan (2013). The Future of Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 44 (3):241-253.
    In this article the editor of the Philosophical Quarterly briefly outlines the editorial process at that journal; explains why it is foolhardy to attempt to predict the future of philosophy; and, finally, attempts such a prediction. Drawing on his recent book Ethics for a Broken World, he argues that climate change, or some other disaster, may lead to a broken world where the optimistic assumptions underlying contemporary philosophy no longer apply. He argues that the possibility of a broken world has (...)
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  6. Tim Mulgan (2012). Rationis Defensor.
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  7. Tim Mulgan (2012). The Future of Utilitarianism. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor.
    Climate change has obvious practical implications. It will kill millions of people, wipe out thousands of species, and so on. My question in this paper is much narrower. How might climate change impact on moral theory – and especially on the debate between utilitarians and their non-utilitarian rivals? I argue that climate change creates serious theoretical difficulties for non-utilitarian moral theories – especially those that based morality or justice on any contract or bargain for reciprocal advantage. Climate change thus tips (...)
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  8. Garrett Cullity, Brad Hooker & Tim Mulgan (2011). Intuitions and the Demands of Consequentialism. Utilitas 23 (1).
  9. Tim Mulgan (2011). Ethics for a Broken World: Imagining Philosophy After Catastrophe. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Preface : imagining a broken world -- Philosophy in the age of affluence -- pt. I. Rights -- Nozick on rights -- Self-ownership -- The Lockean proviso -- Nozick in a broken world -- Nationalism -- pt. II. Utilitarianism -- Act utilitarianism -- Rule utilitarianism -- Well-being and value -- Mill on liberty -- Utilitarianism and future people -- Utilitarianism in a broken world -- pt. III. The social contract -- Hobbes and Locke -- Rawls -- Rawls and the future (...)
     
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  10. Tim Mulgan (2010). Population. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
     
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  11. Tim Mulgan (2009). Rule Consequentialism and Non-Identity. In David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer. 115--134.
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  12. Tim Mulgan (2008). Experience, Utilitarianism and Climate Change. Rivista di Filosofia 99 (3):511-530.
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  13. Tim Mulgan (2008). Review: Weighing Lives. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):363 - 368.
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  14. Tim Mulgan (2008). Weighing Lives. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):363–368.
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  15. Tim Mulgan & Eugenio Lecaldano (2008). L'esperienza, l'Utilitarismo E Il Cambiamento Climatico. Rivista di Filosofia 99 (3):511-529.
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  16. Timothy Mulgan (2007). Ethics: Twelve Lectures on the Philosophy of Morality - by David Wiggins. Philosophical Books 48 (4):373-376.
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  17. Tim Mulgan (2006). Future People: A Moderate Consequentialist Account of Our Obligations to Future Generations. Oxford University Press.
    What do we owe to our descendants? How do we balance their needs against our own? Tim Mulgan develops a new theory of our obligations to future generations, based on a new rule-consequentialist account of the morality of individual reproduction. He also brings together several different contemporary philosophical discussions, including the demands of morality and international justice. His aim is to produce a coherent, intuitively plausible moral theory that is not unreasonably demanding, even when extended to cover future people. While (...)
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  18. Tim Mulgan (2006). SLOTE'S SATISFICING CONSEQUENTIALISM. Ratio 6 (2):121 - 134.
    The article discusses Michael Slote's Satisficing Consequentialism, which is the view that moral agents are not required to maximise the good, but merely to produce a sufficient amount of good. It is argued that Satisficing Consequentialism is not an acceptable alternative to Maximising Consequentialism. In particular, it is argued that Satisficing Consequentialism cannot be less demanding in practice than Maximising Consequentialism without also endorsing a wide range of clearly unacceptable actions. It is then argued that Slote's inability to provide adequate (...)
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  19. Timothy Mulgan (2005). Reply to John Turri. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (4):493 – 496.
  20. Tim Mulgan (2004). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):443-459.
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  21. Tim Mulgan (2004). Critical Notice of Jeff McMahan, The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):443-459.
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  22. Tim Mulgan (2004). Roger Crisp and Brad Hooker (Eds.), Well-Being and Morality: Essays in Honour of James Griffin (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2000), Pp. X + 316. Utilitas 16 (3):326-331.
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  23. Tim Mulgan (2004). The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):443-459.
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  24. Tim Mulgan (2003). La Démocratie Post Mortem. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 101 (1):123-137.
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  25. Tim Mulgan (2003). Éthique et mort(s) - La démocratie post mortem. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 101 (1):123-137.
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  26. Tim Mulgan (2003). The Non-Identity Problem. In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 209--218.
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  27. Tim Mulgan (2003). Liam Murphy, Moral Demands in Nonideal Theory, New York, Oxford University Press, 2000, Pp. Viii + 168. Utilitas 15 (01):113-.
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  28. Tim Mulgan (2002). Neutrality, Rebirth and Intergenerational Justice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):3–15.
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  29. Tim Mulgan (2002). Reproducing the Contractarian State. Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (4):465–477.
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  30. Tim Mulgan (2002). Transcending the Infinite Utility Debate. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):164 – 177.
    An infinite future thus threatens to paralyze utilitarianism. Utilitarians need principled ways to determine which possible infinite futures are better or worse. In this article, I discuss a recent suggestion of Peter Vallentyne and Shelly Kagan. I conclude that the best way forward for utilitarians is, in fact, to by-pass the infinite utility debate altogether. (edited).
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  31. Tim Mulgan (2002). The Reverse Repugnant Conclusion. Utilitas 14 (03):360-.
    Total utilitarianism implies Parfit's repugnant conclusion. For any world (A) containing ten billion very happy people, there is a better world (Z) where a vast number of people have lives barely worth living. One common response is to claim that life in Parfit's Z is better than he suggests, and thus that his conclusion is not repugnant. This paper shows that this strategy cannot succeeed. Total utilitarianism also implies a reverse repugnant conclusion. For any world (A-minus) where ten billion people (...)
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  32. Tim Mulgan (2001). A Minimal Test for Political Theories. Philosophia 28 (1-4):283-296.
    Any adequate political theory must provide a plausible account of our obligations to future generations. It must also derive those obligations from morally significant features of our relationship to those who will live in the future, not from contingent accidents of human biology. The Minimal Test outlined in this paper offers a simple way to assess whether political theories are able to meet this challenge. It appears that several popular contemporary political theories will have difficulty passing that test.
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  33. Tim Mulgan (2001). How Satisficers Get Away with Murder. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (1):41 – 46.
    Traditional Consequentialism is based on a demanding principle of impartial maximization. Michael Slote's 'Satisficing Consequentialism' aims to reduce the demands of Consequentialism, by no longer requiring us to bring about the best possible outcome. This paper presents a new objection to Satisficing Consequentialism. We begin with a simple thought experiment, in which an agent must choose whether to save the lives of ten innocent people by using a sand bag or by killing an innocent person. The main aim of the (...)
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  34. Tim Mulgan (2001). The Demands of Consequentialism. Oxford University Press.
    Tim Mulgan presents a penetrating examination of consequentialism: the theory that human behavior must be judged in terms of the goodness or badness of its consequences. The problem with consequentialism is that it seems unreasonably demanding, leaving us no room for our own aims and interests. In response, Mulgan offers his own, more practical version of consequentialism--one that will surely appeal to philosophers and laypersons alike.
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  35. Tim Mulgan (2001). What's Really Wrong with the Limited Quantity View? Ratio 14 (2):153–164.
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  36. Tim Mulgan (2000). Two Moral Counterfactuals. Philosophical Forum 31 (1):47–55.
  37. Timothy Mulgan (2000). Dissolving the Mere Addition Paradox. American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (4):359 - 372.
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  38. Andrew Moore & Tim Mulgan (1997). Open Letter. Health Care Analysis 5 (1):85-91.
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  39. Tim Mulgan (1997). Two Conceptions of Benevolence. Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (1):62–79.
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  40. Tim Mulgan (1997). A Non-Proportional Hybrid Moral Theory. Utilitas 9 (03):291-.
    A common objection to consequentialism is that it makes unreasonable demands upon moral agents, by failing to allow agents to give special weight to their own personal projects and interests. A prominent recent response to this objection is that of Samuel Scheffler, who seeks to make room for moral agents by building agent-centred prerogatives into a consequentialist moral theory. In this paper, I present a new objection to Scheffler's account. I then sketch an improved prerogative, which avoids this objection by (...)
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  41. Tim Mulgan (1996). One False Virtue of Rule Consequentialism, and One New Vice. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):362-373.
    A common objection to _act consequentialism (AC) is that it makes unreasonable demands on moral agents. _Rule consequentialism (RC) is often presented as a less demanding alternative. It is argued that this alleged virtue of RC is false, as RC will not be any less demanding in practice than AC. It is then demonstrated that RC has an additional (hitherto unnoticed) vice, as it relies upon the undefended simplifying assumption that the best possible consequences would arise in a society in (...)
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  42. Tim Mulgan (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 103 (412):550-553.
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  43. Tim Mulgan (1994). Rule Consequentialism and Famine. Analysis 54 (3):187 - 192.
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  44. Tim Mulgan (1993). The Unhappy Conclusion and the Life of Virtue. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (172):357-359.