Search results for 'Timaeus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nadine Nannan, Ian M. Timaeus, Ria Laubscher & Debbie Bradshaw (2007). Levels and Differentials in Childhood Mortality in South Africa 1977-1998. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (4):613.score: 30.0
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  2. Dirk Baltzly (2007). Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, Part III – Proclus on the World’s Body. A Translation with Notes and Introduction,. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    In the present volume Proclus comments on the creation of the body of the universe in Plato's Timaeus.
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  3. Dirk Baltzly (2010). Is Plato's Timaeus Panentheistic? Sophia 49 (2):193-215.score: 24.0
    Hartshorne and Reese thought that in the Timaeus Plato wasn’t quite a panentheist—though he would have been if he’d been consistent. More recently, Cooper has argued that while Plato’s World Soul may have inspired panentheists, Plato’s text does not itself describe a form of panenetheism. In this paper, I will reconsider this question not only by examining closely the Timaeus but by thinking about which features of current characterizations of panentheism are historically accidental and how the core of (...)
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  4. Emanuela Bianchi (2006). Receptacle/Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus. Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.score: 24.0
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction (...)
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  5. Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (2007). Meta-Discourse: Plato's Timaeus According to Calcidius. Phronesis 52 (3):301-327.score: 24.0
    This paper brings Calcidius' 4th. c. AD Latin commentary on Plato's Timaeus into the fold of research on the methodological assumptions and hermeneutical practices of the ancient commentary tradition. The first part deals with the question of how Calcidius sets his role as a commentator in relation to the original text, to his audience, and to the Platonist tradition. The second part examines the organizing principles and structuring devices of the commentary, and what these can tell us about connections (...)
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  6. Brian D. Prince (2013). Physical Change in Plato's Timaeus. Apeiron:1-19.score: 24.0
    In this paper I ask how Timaeus explains change within the trianglebased part of his cosmos. Two common views are that change among physical items is somehow caused or enabled by either the forms or the demiurge. I argue for a competing view, on which the physical items are capable of bringing about change by themselves, prior to the intervention of the demiurge, and prior to their being turned into imitations of the forms. I outline three problems for the (...)
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  7. Joshua Wilburn (forthcoming). The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Timaeus. Journal of the History of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    In this paper I offer an account of how the reasoning part of the soul communicates its “commands,” “threats,” and “exhortations” to the spirited part of the soul in Plato’s Timaeus. I consider and reject two recent approaches and defend an alternative, “imagistic” account, according to which the various “messages” that reason issues affect the lower parts of the soul, including spirit, in the form of mental “images.” The spirited part, moreover, is not only responsible for supporting and carrying (...)
     
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  8. Dirk Baltzly (2009). Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, Part IV – Proclus on the World Soul. A Translation with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    In the present volume Proclus describes the 'creation' of the soul that animates the entire universe. This is not a literal creation, for Proclus argues that Plato means only to convey the eternal dependence of the World Soul upon higher causes. In his exegesis of Plato's text, Proclus addresses a range of issues in Pythagorean harmonic theory, as well as questions about the way in which the World Soul knows both forms and the visible reality that comprises its body. This (...)
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  9. Laura Grams (2009). Medical Theory in Plato's Timaeus. Rhizai 6:161-192.score: 21.0
  10. Amber D. Carpenter (2010). Embodied Intelligent (?) Souls: Plants in Plato's Timaeus. Phronesis 55 (4):281-303.score: 21.0
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  11. Sarah Broadie (2008). Theological Sidelights From Plato's Timaeus. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):1-17.score: 18.0
    Plato's account of the making of the world by a supreme divinity has often been felt to foreshadow the natural theology associated with orthodox western religion. This paper examines some significant ways (having more than merely antiquarian interest, it is hoped) in which the Timaeus scheme differs from more familiar orthodoxy.
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  12. Amber D. Carpenter (2011). Embodied Intelligent (?) Souls: Plants in Platos Timaeus. Phronesis 55 (4):281-303.score: 18.0
    In the Timaeus , plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. Also in the Timaeus , perception requires the involvement of to phronimon . It seems it must follow that plants are intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that ` to phronimon ' is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are (...)
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  13. T. K. Johansen (2004). Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critas. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    What is the Timaeus-Critias about? -- The status of the Atlantis story -- The status of Timaeus' account -- Teleology and craftsmanship -- Necessity an teleology -- Space and motion -- Body, soul, and tripartition -- Perception and cosmology -- Dialogue and dialectic.
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  14. Plato (1937). Plato's Cosmology: The Timaeus of Plato. Hackett Publishing Company.score: 18.0
    ". . . one of the masterpieces of classical scholarship. . . . Contemporary work on the Timaeus will inevitably take Plato's Cosmology as its starting point." -- Charles H Kahn, University of Pennsylvania.
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  15. Sarah Broadie (2011). Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Machine generated contents note: What lies ahead; 1. The separateness of the demiurge; 2. Paradigms and epistemic possibilities; 3. The metaphysics of the paradigm; 4. Immortal intellect under mortal conditions; 5. The Timaeus-Critias Complex; 6. The genesis of the four elements; 7. Divine and natural causation; In conclusion.
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  16. Marije Martijn (2010). Proclus on Nature: Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Brill.score: 18.0
    One of the hardest questions to answer for a (Neo)platonist is to what extent and how the changing and unreliable world of sense perception can itself be an object of scientific knowledge. My dissertation is a study of the answer given to that question by the Neoplatonist Proclus (Athens, 411-485) in his Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. I present a new explanation of Proclus’ concept of nature and show that philosophy of nature consists of several related subdisciplines matching the ontological (...)
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  17. Han Baltussen (2012). One Book, The Whole Universe: Plato's Timaeus Today. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):132-133.score: 18.0
    A new volume on one of the most influential and most discussed works from antiquity should offer something new. In this truly interdisciplinary volume, a great number of intriguing problems posed by Plato's Timaeus are given a fresh and lucid treatment. Contributors from an unusual range of backgrounds reflect on aspects of Plato's astounding synthesis of natural philosophy, including cosmology, theology, perception, physiology, and more. Plato's synthesis was original, reusing previous ideas for a new vision of the structure and (...)
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  18. Jill Gordon (2005). Eros in Plato's Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):255-278.score: 18.0
    The Timaeus, a decidedly non-erotic dialogue, provides surprising philosophical insight into the role and importance of eros in human life. Contrary to manytraditional readings of the dialogue, the Timaeus indicates that eros is an original part of the disembodied soul as created by the demiurge, and as such, is part of the noetic or intelligent design of the cosmos. Timaeus reveals, furthermore, that eros is the moving force behind our desire to know first causes and the noetic (...)
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  19. Harold Tarrant, Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Volume 1, Book 1: Proclus on the Socratic State and Atlantis.score: 18.0
    Proclus' Commentary on Plato's dialogue Timaeus is arguably the most important commentary on a text of Plato, offering unparalleled insights into eight centuries of Platonic interpretation. This edition offers the first new English translation of the work for nearly two centuries, building on significant recent advances in scholarship on Neoplatonic commentators. It provides an invaluable record of early interpretations of Plato's dialogue, while also presenting Proclus' own views on the meaning and significance of Platonic philosophy. The present volume, the (...)
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  20. Emma R. Jones (2012). The Nature of Place and the Place of Nature in Plato's Timaeus and Aristotle's Physics. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):247-268.score: 18.0
    I offer a comparison between Plato’s discussion of χώρα in the Timaeus at 48A–53C and Aristotle’s discussion of τόπος in Physics Book IV, arguing that the two accounts have more in common than has been suggested by Continental scholars. Τόπος and χώρα both signal what I call the impasse of place as the question of that which cannot be reduced to either the sensible or the intelligible, and which (un)grounds such categories. Identifying this impasse reveals Plato’s and Aristotle’s accounts (...)
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  21. Filip Karfík (2012). The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.score: 18.0
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s (...)
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  22. Plato (2003). Gorgias and Timaeus. Courier Dover Publications.score: 18.0
    "Gorgias" addresses the temptations of success and the rewards of a moral life while "Timaeus" explains the world in terms not only of physical laws but also of metaphysical and religious principles.
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  23. Dirk Baltzly (2007). Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus -- Vol. 3, Book 3 Pt 1: Proclus on the World's Body. Cambridge Univ Pr.score: 18.0
    Translation of Proclus' Commentary on Timaeus 31b--34a.
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  24. Jena G. Jolissaint (2007). Sacred Doorways: Tracing the Body in Plato's Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):333-352.score: 18.0
    This paper develops a structural parallel between the maternal/feminine body in Greek mythology and the figure of the body in Plato’s Timaeus. HistoricallyPlato is often portrayed as a thinker who is concerned with the corporeal only insofar as philosophy is engaged in transcending bodily limitations. Yet the Timaeus is not engaged in producing a dualistic opposition between the intelligible and the sensible, nor is Platonic philosophy a rejection of life in favor of the perfect wisdom that comes with (...)
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  25. Richard Mohr (1980). The Mechanism of Flux in Plato's "Timaeus". Apeiron 14 (2):96 - 114.score: 18.0
    The paper argues that in the "timaeus" plato views the phenomena in and of themselves as a positive source of evil, moving erratically without psychic causes whether rational or irrational, direct or indirect, and so the paper argues that "timaeus" contradicts the psychic autokenetic doctrine from the "phaedrus" and "laws x". The argument is based on a detailed analysis of "timaeus", 52d-53a and 58a-c, plato's description of chaos an his 'atomic' theory.
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  26. Catherine Zuckert (2011). Socrates and Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):331-360.score: 18.0
    Plato’s Timaeus is usually taken to be a sequel to the Republic which shows the cosmological basis of Plato’s politics. In this article I challenge the traditional understanding by arguing that neither Critias’s nor Timaeus’s speech performs the assigned function. The contrast between Timaeus’s monologue and the silently listening Socrates dramatizes the philosophical differences between investigations of “the human things,” like those conducted by Socrates, and attempts to demonstrate the intelligible, mathematically calculable order of the sensible natural (...)
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  27. Pavel Gregorić (2012). The First Humans in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):183-198.score: 18.0
    Plato’s Timaeus gives an account of the creation of the world and of human race. The text suggests that there was a first generation of human beings, and that they were all men. The paper raises difficulties for this traditional view, and considers an alternative, suggested in more recent literature, according to which humans of the first generation were sexually undifferentiated. The paper raises difficulties for the alternative view as well, and examines the third possibility, advocated by some ancient (...)
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  28. Sarah Klitenic Wear (2011). The Teachings of Syrianus on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides. Brill.score: 18.0
    This books delves into the major tenets of Syrianus' philosophical teachings on the Timaeus and Parmenides based on the testimonia of Proclus, as found in Proclus' commentaries on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides, and Damascius, as reported ...
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  29. A. E. Taylor (2013). Plato: Timaeus and Critias (Rle: Plato). Routledge.score: 18.0
    Plato’s Timaeus was his only cosmological dialogue and for almost thirteen hundred years it provided the basis in the West for educated people’s general view of the natural world. The author provides a translation of this important work, together with the Critias – the source of the legendary tale of Atlantis. He has taken particular care to provide an accurate rendering of Plato’s words and to avoid putting his own or any other interpretation on the works.
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  30. Gabriela Roxana Carone (1997). The Ethical Function of Astronomy in Plato's Timaeus. In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias.score: 18.0
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  31. Erik Ostenfeld (1997). The Role and Status of the Forms in the Timaeus: Paradigmatism Revised? In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias. 167--177.score: 18.0
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  32. Marek Piechowiak (2013). Przemowa Demiurga W Platońskim „Timajosie” a Współczesne Pojęcie Godności [Demiurge’s Speech in Plato’s “Timaeus” and the Contemporary Concept of Dignity]. In Antoni Dębiński (ed.), Abiit, non obiit. Księga poświęcona pamięci Księdza Profesora Antoniego Kościa SVD. Wydawnictwo KUL. 655-665.score: 18.0
    Today, dignity recognized as a fundamental value across legal systems is equal, inherent and inalienable, inviolable, is the source of human rights and is essential for its subject to be recognized as an autotelic entity (an end in itself) that cannot be treated as an object. The analysis of the extract from Plato’s Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato developed a reflection on something that determines the qualitative difference between certain beings and the world of things, and that (...)
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  33. William J. Prior (1983). Timaeus 48e-52d and the Third Man Argument. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9.score: 18.0
    In this article I argue that "timaeus" 48e-52d, The passage in which plato introduces the receptacle into his ontology, Contains the material for a satisfactory response to the third man argument. Plato's use of "this" and "such" to distinguish the receptacle, Becoming, And the forms clarifies the nature of his ontology and indicates that the forms are not, In general, Self-Predicative. This result removes one argument against regarding the "timaeus" as a late dialogue.
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  34. Proclus (2007). Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Proclus' Commentary on Plato's dialogue Timaeus is arguably the most important commentary on a text of Plato, offering unparalleled insights into eight centuries of Platonic interpretation. This edition offers the first new English translation of the work for nearly two centuries, building on significant recent advances in scholarship on Neoplatonic commentators. It provides an invaluable record of early interpretations of Plato's dialogue, while also presenting Proclus' own views on the meaning and significance of Platonic philosophy. The present volume, the (...)
     
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  35. G. Reale (1997). Plato's Doctrine of the Origin of the World, with Special Reference to the Timaeus'. In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias. 149--164.score: 18.0
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  36. Samuel Scolnicov (1997). Freedom and Education in Plato's Timaeus. In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias.score: 18.0
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  37. David Sedley (1997). &Quot; Becoming Like God' in the Timaeus and Aristotle. In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias. 327-39.score: 18.0
  38. A. E. Taylor (2014). Plato: Timaeus and Critias (Rle: Plato). Routledge.score: 18.0
    Plato’s Timaeus was his only cosmological dialogue and for almost thirteen hundred years it provided the basis in the West for educated people’s general view of the natural world. The author provides a translation of this important work, together with the Critias – the source of the legendary tale of Atlantis. He has taken particular care to provide an accurate rendering of Plato’s words and to avoid putting his own or any other interpretation on the works.
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  39. Stephen Gersh (2009). Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 310-311.score: 15.0
  40. G. E. L. Owen (1953). The Place of the Timaeus in Plato's Dialogues. Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):79-.score: 15.0
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  41. Steven K. Strange (1985). The Double Explanation in the Timaeus. Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):25-39.score: 15.0
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  42. Glenn R. Morrow (1950). Necessity and Persuasion in Plato's Timaeus. Philosophical Review 59 (2):147-163.score: 15.0
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  43. J. L. Stocks (1930). A Commentary on Plato's “Timaeus.” By A. E. Taylor D.Litt., F.B.A. (Oxford: Clarendon Press: Humphrey Milford. 1928. Pp. Xvi + 700. Price 42s. Net.)Plato: Timaeus and Critias. Translated by A. E. Taylor. (London: Methuen & Co. 1929. Pp. Vi + 136. Price 6s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 5 (17):113-.score: 15.0
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  44. Sara Ahbel-Rappe (2008). Review of Proclus, Dirk Baltzly (Ed., Trans.), Commentary on Plato's Timaeus: Volume III, Book 3, Part I [Proclus on the World's Body]. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).score: 15.0
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  45. Anna Somfai (2002). The Eleventh-Century Shift in the Reception of Plato's "Timaeus" and Calcidius's "Commentary". Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 65:1-21.score: 15.0
  46. Thomas Johansen, Truth, Lies and History in Plato's Timaeus-Critias.score: 15.0
    From antiquity on, the status of Critias' account has been the subject of intense debate. Is the Atlantis story 'real history'? The dialogue invites us to raise this question but also to reflect on its terms. In this paper I shall argue that the story should be seen as 'history' only in a special Platonic sense: it is a story which is fabricated about the past in order to reflect a general truth about how ideal citizens would behave in action.
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  47. David Keyt (1971). The Mad Craftsman of the Timaeus. Philosophical Review 80 (2):230-235.score: 15.0
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  48. Warman Welliver (1977). Character, Plot and Thought in Plato's Timaeus-Critias. Brill.score: 15.0
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  49. James V. Robinson (1990). The Tripartite Soul in the Timaeus. Phronesis 35 (1):103-110.score: 15.0
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  50. Andrew S. Mason (1994). Immortality in the "Timaeus". Phronesis 39 (1):90 - 97.score: 15.0
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