Search results for 'Timaeus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Nadine Nannan, Ian M. Timaeus, Ria Laubscher & Debbie Bradshaw (2007). Levels and Differentials in Childhood Mortality in South Africa 1977-1998. Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (4):613.
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  2.  12
    Barbara M. Sattler (2010). A Time for Learning and for Counting – Egyptians, Greeks and Empirical Processes in Plato’s Timaeus. In Richard Mohr & Barbara M. Sattler (eds.), One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today. Parmenides Press 249-266.
    This paper argues that processes in the sensible realm can be in accord with reason in the Timaeus, since rationality is understood here as being based on regularity, which is conferred onto processes by time. Plato uses two different temporal structures in the Timaeus, associated with the contrast there drawn between Greek and Egyptian approaches to history. The linear order of before and after marks natural processes as rational and underlies the Greek treatment of history. By contrast, a (...)
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  3. Emanuela Bianchi (2006). Receptacle/Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus. Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction (...)
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  4.  73
    William J. Prior (1983). Timaeus 48e-52d and the Third Man Argument. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9:123-147.
    In this article I argue that "Timaeus" 48e-52d, the passage in which Plato introduces the receptacle into his ontology, Contains the material for a satisfactory response to the third man argument. Plato's use of "this" and "such" to distinguish the receptacle, Becoming, And the forms clarifies the nature of his ontology and indicates that the forms are not, In general, self-predicative. This result removes one argument against regarding the "Timaeus" as a late dialogue.
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  5.  36
    Brian D. Prince (2013). Physical Change in Plato's Timaeus. Apeiron:1-19.
    In this paper I ask how Timaeus explains change within the trianglebased part of his cosmos. Two common views are that change among physical items is somehow caused or enabled by either the forms or the demiurge. I argue for a competing view, on which the physical items are capable of bringing about change by themselves, prior to the intervention of the demiurge, and prior to their being turned into imitations of the forms. I outline three problems for the (...)
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  6.  57
    Dirk Baltzly (2010). Is Plato's Timaeus Panentheistic? Sophia 49 (2):193-215.
    Hartshorne and Reese thought that in the Timaeus Plato wasn’t quite a panentheist—though he would have been if he’d been consistent. More recently, Cooper has argued that while Plato’s World Soul may have inspired panentheists, Plato’s text does not itself describe a form of panenetheism. In this paper, I will reconsider this question not only by examining closely the Timaeus but by thinking about which features of current characterizations of panentheism are historically accidental and how the core of (...)
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  7. Brad Berman (forthcoming). Making the World Body Whole and Complete: Plato's Timaeus, 32c5-33b1. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition.
    Plato’s demiurge makes a series of questionable decisions in creating the world. Most notoriously, he endeavors to replicate, to the extent possible, some of the features that his model possesses just insofar as it is a Form. This has provoked the colorful complaint that the demiurge is as raving mad as a general contractor who constructs a house of vellum to better realize the architect’s vellum plans (Keyt 1971). The present paper considers the sanity of the demiurge’s reasoning in light (...)
     
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  8.  15
    Amber D. Carpenter (2010). Embodied Intelligent (?) Souls: Plants in Plato's Timaeus. Phronesis 55 (4):281-303.
    In the Timaeus, plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. Also in the Timaeus, perception requires the involvement of to phronimon. It seems it must follow that plants are intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that `to phronimon' is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are to be both orderly and (...)
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  9.  7
    Catherine Osborne (1996). Space, Time, Shape, and Direction: Creative Discourse in the Timaeus. In Christopher Gill & Mary Margaret McCabe (eds.), Form and Argument in Late Plato. Oxford University Press 179--211.
    There is an analogy between Timaeus's act of describing a world in words and the demiurge's task of making a world of matter. This analogy implies a parallel between language as a system of reproducing ideas in words, and the world, which reproduces reality in particular things. Authority lies in the creation of a likeness in words of the eternal Forms. The Forms serve as paradigms both for the physical world created by the demiurge, and for the world in (...)
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  10.  26
    Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (2007). Meta-Discourse: Plato's Timaeus According to Calcidius. Phronesis 52 (3):301-327.
    This paper brings Calcidius' 4th. c. AD Latin commentary on Plato's Timaeus into the fold of research on the methodological assumptions and hermeneutical practices of the ancient commentary tradition. The first part deals with the question of how Calcidius sets his role as a commentator in relation to the original text, to his audience, and to the Platonist tradition. The second part examines the organizing principles and structuring devices of the commentary, and what these can tell us about connections (...)
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  11. Dirk Baltzly (2007). Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, Part III – Proclus on the World’s Body. A Translation with Notes and Introduction,. Cambridge University Press.
    In the present volume Proclus comments on the creation of the body of the universe in Plato's Timaeus.
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  12. Josh Wilburn (2014). The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Timaeus. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):627-652.
    in the tripartite psychology of the Republic, Plato characterizes the “spirited” part of the soul as the “ally of reason”: like the auxiliaries of the just city, whose distinctive job is to support the policies and judgments passed down by the rulers, spirit’s distinctive “job” in the soul is to support and defend the practical decisions and commands of the reasoning part. This is to include not only defense against external enemies who might interfere with those commands, but also, and (...)
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  13. Laura Grams (2009). Medical Theory in Plato's Timaeus. Rhizai 6:161-192.
  14. Dirk Baltzly (2009). Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, Part IV – Proclus on the World Soul. A Translation with Notes and Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    In the present volume Proclus describes the 'creation' of the soul that animates the entire universe. This is not a literal creation, for Proclus argues that Plato means only to convey the eternal dependence of the World Soul upon higher causes. In his exegesis of Plato's text, Proclus addresses a range of issues in Pythagorean harmonic theory, as well as questions about the way in which the World Soul knows both forms and the visible reality that comprises its body. This (...)
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  15. Mitchell Miller (2003). The Timaeus and the Longer Way. In Gretchen Reydams-Schils (ed.), Plato's Timaeus as Cultural Icon. University of Notre Dame Press 17-59.
    A study of the significance of Plato's resumption of the simile of model and likeness in the Timaeus, with attention to the place of the Timaeus in the "longer way" that Plato has Socrates announce in the Republic. The reader embarked on the "longer way," I argue, will find in the accounts of the elements and of the kinds of animals unannounced but detailed exhibitions of the "god-given" method of dialectic that Plato has Socrates announce in the Philebus.
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  16. Sarah Broadie (2011). Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus. Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Timaeus is one of the most influential and challenging works of ancient philosophy to have come down to us. Sarah Broadie's rich and compelling study proposes new interpretations of major elements of the Timaeus, including the separate Demiurge, the cosmic 'beginning', the 'second mixing', the Receptacle and the Atlantis story. Broadie shows how Plato deploys the mythic themes of the Timaeus to convey fundamental philosophical insights and examines the profoundly differing methods of interpretation which have been (...)
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  17.  26
    Marije Martijn (2010). Proclus on Nature: Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Brill.
    One of the hardest questions to answer for a (Neo)platonist is to what extent and how the changing and unreliable world of sense perception can itself be an object of scientific knowledge. My dissertation is a study of the answer given to that question by the Neoplatonist Proclus (Athens, 411-485) in his Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. I present a new explanation of Proclus’ concept of nature and show that philosophy of nature consists of several related subdisciplines matching the ontological (...)
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  18.  45
    T. K. Johansen (2004). Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critas. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the Timaeus-Critias about? -- The status of the Atlantis story -- The status of Timaeus' account -- Teleology and craftsmanship -- Necessity an teleology -- Space and motion -- Body, soul, and tripartition -- Perception and cosmology -- Dialogue and dialectic.
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  19.  39
    Sarah Broadie (2011). Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: What lies ahead; 1. The separateness of the demiurge; 2. Paradigms and epistemic possibilities; 3. The metaphysics of the paradigm; 4. Immortal intellect under mortal conditions; 5. The Timaeus-Critias Complex; 6. The genesis of the four elements; 7. Divine and natural causation; In conclusion.
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  20.  11
    Plato (2003). Gorgias and Timaeus. Courier Dover Publications.
    "Gorgias" addresses the temptations of success and the rewards of a moral life while "Timaeus" explains the world in terms not only of physical laws but also of metaphysical and religious principles.
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  21. Plato . (ed.) (2009). Timaeus and Critias. Oxford University Press Uk.
    'The god wanted everything to be good, marred by as little imperfection as possible.'Timaeus, one of Plato's acknowledged masterpieces, is an attempt to construct the universe and explain its contents by means of as few axioms as possible. The result is a brilliant, bizarre, and surreal cosmos - the product of the rational thinking of a creator god and his astral assistants, and of purely mechanistic causes based on the behaviour of the four elements. At times dazzlingly clear, at (...)
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  22.  26
    Marek Piechowiak (2013). Przemowa Demiurga W Platońskim „Timajosie” a Współczesne Pojęcie Godności [Demiurge’s Speech in Plato’s “Timaeus” and the Contemporary Concept of Dignity]. In Antoni Dębiński (ed.), Abiit, non obiit. Księga poświęcona pamięci Księdza Profesora Antoniego Kościa SVD. Wydawnictwo KUL 655-665.
    Today, dignity recognized as a fundamental value across legal systems is equal, inherent and inalienable, inviolable, is the source of human rights and is essential for its subject to be recognized as an autotelic entity (an end in itself) that cannot be treated as an object. The analysis of the extract from Plato’s Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato developed a reflection on something that determines the qualitative difference between certain beings and the world of things, and that (...)
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  23.  49
    G. E. L. Owen (1953). The Place of the Timaeus in Plato's Dialogues. Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):79-.
    It is now nearly axiomatic among Platonic scholars that the Timaeus and its unfinished sequel the Critias belong to the last stage of Plato's writings. The Laws is generally held to be wholly or partly a later production. So, by many, is the Philebus, but that is all. Perhaps the privileged status of the Timaeus in the Middle Ages helped to fix the conviction that it embodies Plato's maturest theories.
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  24. David Sedley (1997). " Becoming Like God' in the Timaeus and Aristotle. In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias. 327-39.
  25.  14
    Filip Karfík (2012). The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s (...)
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  26. Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (1999). Demiurge and Providence: Stoic and Platonist Readings of Plato's Timaeus. Brepols.
    Of the rich legacy of the Timaeus, this study deals with the cross-pollination between Stoic and Platonist readings of Timaeus, spanning the period from Plato's writings to that of the so-called Middle Platonist authors. Plato's Timaeus and Stoic doctrine had their fates intertwined from very early on, both in polemical and reconciliatory contexts. The blend of Platonic and Stoic elements ultimately constituted one of the main conceptual bridges between the pagan tradition on the one hand and the (...)
     
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  27. Vassilis Karasmanis (2005). AΝΑΓΚΗ and ΝΟΥΣ: The Method of Biological Research in the Timaeus. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:167-182.
    In the last part of the Timaeus, where Plato presents his ideas about human physiology but also about biology in general, we find the combined activity of Intellect and Necessity. In this essay I investigate whether Plato, apart from his general statement about the combined activity of Reason and Necessity, proposes a more specific method of biological research. For this purpose I am going to examine some methodological passages as well as the way in which he exposes and develops (...)
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  28.  78
    Sarah Broadie (2008). Theological Sidelights From Plato's Timaeus. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):1-17.
    Plato's account of the making of the world by a supreme divinity has often been felt to foreshadow the natural theology associated with orthodox western religion. This paper examines some significant ways (having more than merely antiquarian interest, it is hoped) in which the Timaeus scheme differs from more familiar orthodoxy.
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  29.  56
    Amber D. Carpenter (2011). Embodied Intelligent (?) Souls: Plants in Platos Timaeus. Phronesis 55 (4):281-303.
    In the Timaeus , plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. Also in the Timaeus , perception requires the involvement of to phronimon . It seems it must follow that plants are intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that ` to phronimon ' is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are (...)
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  30.  40
    Jill Gordon (2005). Eros in Plato's Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):255-278.
    The Timaeus, a decidedly non-erotic dialogue, provides surprising philosophical insight into the role and importance of eros in human life. Contrary to manytraditional readings of the dialogue, the Timaeus indicates that eros is an original part of the disembodied soul as created by the demiurge, and as such, is part of the noetic or intelligent design of the cosmos. Timaeus reveals, furthermore, that eros is the moving force behind our desire to know first causes and the noetic (...)
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  31.  33
    Emma R. Jones (2012). The Nature of Place and the Place of Nature in Plato's Timaeus and Aristotle's Physics. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):247-268.
    I offer a comparison between Plato’s discussion of χώρα in the Timaeus at 48A–53C and Aristotle’s discussion of τόπος in Physics Book IV, arguing that the two accounts have more in common than has been suggested by Continental scholars. Τόπος and χώρα both signal what I call the impasse of place as the question of that which cannot be reduced to either the sensible or the intelligible, and which (un)grounds such categories. Identifying this impasse reveals Plato’s and Aristotle’s accounts (...)
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  32.  37
    Han Baltussen (2012). One Book, The Whole Universe: Plato's Timaeus Today. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):132-133.
    A new volume on one of the most influential and most discussed works from antiquity should offer something new. In this truly interdisciplinary volume, a great number of intriguing problems posed by Plato's Timaeus are given a fresh and lucid treatment. Contributors from an unusual range of backgrounds reflect on aspects of Plato's astounding synthesis of natural philosophy, including cosmology, theology, perception, physiology, and more. Plato's synthesis was original, reusing previous ideas for a new vision of the structure and (...)
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  33.  54
    Stephen Gersh (2009). Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 310-311.
    This is the third of the five volumes projected by Cambridge University Press in its new English translation of Proclus's important commentary on Plato's Timaeus. It contains a translation of about one third of the second volume of Ernst Diehl's critical edition of the Greek text covering Proclus's commentary on Plato's discussion of the world's body at Timaeus 31b–34a. The volume of translation also includes an introduction, notes, glossaries , and a general index. Baltzly's translation is the first (...)
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  34.  21
    Filip Karfík (2012). The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s (...)
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  35.  16
    Rüdiger Arnzen (2013). Proclus on Plato's Timaeus 89e3–90c7. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 23 (1):1-45.
    Although the existence of an Arabic translation of a section of Proclus' commentary on Plato's Timaeus lost in the Greek has been known since long, this text has not yet enjoyed a modern edition. The present article aims to consummate this desideratum by offering a critical edition of the Arabic fragment accompanied by an annotated English translation. The attached study of the contents and structure of the extant fragment shows that it displays all typical formal elements of Proclus' commentaries, (...)
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  36.  7
    Filip Karfík (2012). The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s (...)
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  37.  7
    Filip Karfík (2012). The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s (...)
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  38.  5
    Brian D. Prince (2014). The Metaphysics of Bodily Health and Disease in Plato's Timaeus. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (5):908-928.
    Near the end of his speech, Timaeus outlines a theory of bodily health and disease which has seemed to many commentators loosely unified or even inconsistent . But this section is better unified than it has appeared, and gives us at least one important insight into the workings of physical causality in the Timaeus. I argue first that the apparent disorder in Timaeus’s theory of disease is likely a deliberate effect planned by the author. Second, the taxonomy (...)
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  39.  7
    Filip Karfík (2012). The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s (...)
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  40. Katerina Ierodiakonou (2005). Plato's Theory of Colours in the Timaeus. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:219-233.
    This article attempts to give a systematic analysis of the passage 67c4–68d7 from the Timaeus, in which we find Plato’s most detailed, but also extremely obscure, account of the nature and perception of colours. In particular, I focus first on the question how Plato conceives of colour, comparing Plato’s notion with that of Empedocles and showing Plato’s dependence on, but also divergence from, the Empedoclean tradition. Second, I discuss the question what, according to the Timaeus, makes things have (...)
     
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  41.  20
    Jena G. Jolissaint (2007). Sacred Doorways: Tracing the Body in Plato's Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):333-352.
    This paper develops a structural parallel between the maternal/feminine body in Greek mythology and the figure of the body in Plato’s Timaeus. HistoricallyPlato is often portrayed as a thinker who is concerned with the corporeal only insofar as philosophy is engaged in transcending bodily limitations. Yet the Timaeus is not engaged in producing a dualistic opposition between the intelligible and the sensible, nor is Platonic philosophy a rejection of life in favor of the perfect wisdom that comes with (...)
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  42.  3
    James Wood (2014). Taming the Cosmic Rebel: The Place of the Errant Cause in the Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):267-286.
    This paper examines the errant cause in the Timaeus. After eliminating the material elements, matter, chōra, and irrational soul, I show that the source of cosmic disorder lies in the manifestation of difference in genesis. This disorder is a necessary feature of demiurgic formation, which requires generated beings to fall short of their paradigmatic forms and to encounter each other in destabilizing motions. Errancy is thus a threat to generated beings, but it also presents an opportunity and a task (...)
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  43.  11
    Pavel Gregorić (2012). The First Humans in Plato's Timaeus. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):183-198.
    Plato’s Timaeus gives an account of the creation of the world and of human race. The text suggests that there was a first generation of human beings, and that they were all men. The paper raises difficulties for this traditional view, and considers an alternative, suggested in more recent literature, according to which humans of the first generation were sexually undifferentiated. The paper raises difficulties for the alternative view as well, and examines the third possibility, advocated by some ancient (...)
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  44.  4
    Ernesto Paparazzo (2011). Why Five Worlds? Plato's Timaeus 55C–D. Apeiron 44 (2):147-162.
    In the Timaeus, Plato says that the hypothesis of there being five worlds casts a reasonable doubt. Neither ancient commentators of Plato nor modern scholars have succeeded in unveiling the meaning of this hypothesis. I propose that five is the number of combinations with which the five platonic solids can be arranged in sets of four, each set making up a world. I discuss the question of whether Plato's mathematical skills made him equal to the task of calculating the (...)
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  45. István Bodnár (2008). Matters of Size, Texture, and Resilience: The Varieties of Elemental Forms in Plato's Timaeus. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5:9-34.
    Timaeus after assigning four regular solids – tetrahedra, octahedra, icosahedra and cubes – to fire, air, water and earth, respectively, submits at 57d–e that different kinds of gaseous, liquid or solid materials, and their interactions and intertransformations require that the four solids occur in different sizes. The paper discusses two different strategies for the generation of these differences in size: the traditional one, which allows that the triangles that are the fundamental building blocks of these solids do occur in (...)
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  46.  11
    Catherine Zuckert (2011). Socrates and Timaeus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):331-360.
    Plato’s Timaeus is usually taken to be a sequel to the Republic which shows the cosmological basis of Plato’s politics. In this article I challenge the traditional understanding by arguing that neither Critias’s nor Timaeus’s speech performs the assigned function. The contrast between Timaeus’s monologue and the silently listening Socrates dramatizes the philosophical differences between investigations of “the human things,” like those conducted by Socrates, and attempts to demonstrate the intelligible, mathematically calculable order of the sensible natural (...)
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  47.  5
    G. J. Pendrick (1998). Plato, Timaeus 52c2-5. Classical Quarterly 48 (02):556-559.
    In a long and important sentence in the Timaeus , Plato explains that, whereas that which truly or really is () cannot come to be in anything else, sensible things, being mere images, must necessarily come to be in something else, on pain of not existing at all.
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  48.  9
    Richard Mohr (1980). The Mechanism of Flux in Plato's "Timaeus". Apeiron 14 (2):96 - 114.
    The paper argues that in the "timaeus" plato views the phenomena in and of themselves as a positive source of evil, moving erratically without psychic causes whether rational or irrational, direct or indirect, and so the paper argues that "timaeus" contradicts the psychic autokenetic doctrine from the "phaedrus" and "laws x". The argument is based on a detailed analysis of "timaeus", 52d-53a and 58a-c, plato's description of chaos an his 'atomic' theory.
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  49. Karel Thein (2006). The Life Forms and Their Model in Plato's Timaeus. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:241-273.
    The Intelligible Living Thing, posited as the model of our visible and tangible universe in Plato’s Timaeus, is often taken for a richly structured whole, which is not a simple sum of its four major parts. This assumption seems unwarranted – mostspecifically, the dialogue contains no hint at any complex intelligible blue print of the world as a teleologically arranged whole, whose goodness is irreducible to the well-being and individual perfection of its parts. To construe the rich structure of (...)
     
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  50. William H. F. Altman (2016). The Guardians in Action: Plato the Teacher and the Post-Republic Dialogues From Timaeus to Theaetetus. Lexington Books.
    In this book, William H. F. Altman considers the pedagogical connections behind the post-Republic dialogues from Timaeus to Theaetetus in the context of their Reading Order.
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