Search results for 'Time Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. Novak (1996). Buddhist Meditation and Consciousness of Time. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (3):267-77.score: 168.0
  2. Anne Bruce (2007). Time(Lessness): Buddhist Perspectives and End-of-Life. Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):151-157.score: 168.0
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  3. Tilman Frasch (2013). Buddhist Councils in a Time of Transition: Globalism, Modernity and the Preservation of Textual Traditions. Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):38-51.score: 150.0
    This article looks at what is genuinely new in the Buddhist transnationalism of the modern period. It examines the history of Buddhist councils and synods from the early gatherings after the demise of the Buddha to the Buddhist World Council in the twentieth century. These often international events followed a role-model, defined by the first three councils, of creating and handing down an authoritative version of the Buddha's teachings (dhamma) while they could also lead to a ?purification? of the monks' (...)
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  4. Bart Dessein (2011). Time, Temporality, and the Characteristic Marks of the Conditioned: Sarvāstivāda and Madhyamaka Buddhist Interpretations. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):341 - 360.score: 144.0
    According to the Buddhist concept of ?dependent origination? (prat?tyasamutp?da), discrete factors come into existence because of a combination of causes (hetu) and conditions (pratyaya). Such discrete factors, further, are combinations of five aggregates (pañ caskandha) that, themselves, are subject to constant change. Discrete factors, therefore, lack a self-nature (?tman). The passing through time of discrete factors is characterized by the ?characteristic marks of the conditioned?: birth (utp?da), change in continuance (sthityanyath?tva), and passing away (vyaya); or, alternatively: birth (j?ti), duration (...)
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  5. Kenneth K. Inada (1974). Time and Temporality: A Buddhist Approach. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):171-179.score: 144.0
    The buddhist approach to the concepts of time and temporality is necessarily based on the correct understanding of the ordinary but dynamically oriented experiential process. in such a process, the concept of time takes on conventional, arbitrary and abstract natures, and subsequently gives way to the concept of temporality which is part and parcel of the experiential process and directly opens up other buddhist doctrines such as relational origination and voidness of being. temporality is non-conventional 'lived time'.
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  6. Monima Chadha (forthcoming). Time-Series of Ephemeral Impressions: The Abhidharma-Buddhist View of Conscious Experience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-18.score: 138.0
    In the absence of continuing selves or persons, Buddhist philosophers are under pressure to provide a systematic account of phenomenological and other features of conscious experience. Any such Buddhist account of experience, however, faces further problems because of another cardinal tenet of Buddhist revisionary metaphysics: the doctrine of impermanence, which during the Abhidharma period is transformed into the doctrine of momentariness. Setting aside the problems that plague the Buddhist Abhidharma theory of experience because of lack of persons, I shall focus (...)
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  7. Braj M. Sinha (1983). Time and Temporality in Sāṁkhya-Yoga and Abhidharma Buddhism. Munshiram Manoharlal.score: 132.0
     
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  8. David R. Loy (2000). Saving Time: A Buddhist Perspective on the End. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):35-51.score: 126.0
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  9. Hari Shankar Prasad (1996). Time in Buddhism and Leibniz. In Douwe Tiemersma & Henk Oosterling (eds.), Time and Temporality in Intercultural Perspective. Rodopi. 53.score: 126.0
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  10. John Shunji Yokota (2007). Whitehead, Buddhism, and the Reversibility of Time. Process Studies 36 (2):330-344.score: 126.0
    Pure Land Buddhism ascribes to Amida some of the roles ascribed to God by Whitehead. The failure of Whiteheadians to clarify how God can play these roles also leaves doubtful the claim of Pure Land Buddhism. On the other hand, Whitehead’s emphasis on perpetual perishing reinforces the original Buddhist teaching of impermanence and together they provide the basic insight for authentic life.
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  11. John M. Koller (1974). On Buddhist Views of Devouring Time. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):201-208.score: 120.0
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  12. David J. Kalupahana (1974). The Buddhist Conception of Time and Temporality. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):181-191.score: 120.0
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  13. Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids (ed.) (1900/1975). A Buddhist Manual of Psychological Ethics of the Fourth Century B.C.: Being a Translation, Now Made for the First Time, From the Original Pali, of the First Book in the Abhidhamma Piṭaka, Entitled Dhamma-Sangaṇi (Compendium of States or Phenomena). Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.score: 120.0
    Hesperides Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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  14. Douglas W. Shrader (2000). Abhidhamma Studies: Buddhist Explorations of Consciousness and Time (Review). Philosophy East and West 50 (4):637-640.score: 120.0
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  15. Anne Bruce RN PhD (2007). Time(Lessness): Buddhist Perspectives and End-of-Life. Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):151–157.score: 120.0
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  16. Thom Brooks (forthcoming). Better Luck Next Time: A Comparative Analysis of Socrates and Mahayana Buddhism on Reincarnation. Journal of Indian Philosophy.score: 120.0
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  17. Steve Odin (1994). The Epochal Theory of Time in Whitehead and Japanese Buddhism. Process Studies 23 (2):119-133.score: 120.0
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  18. Richard Salomon (forthcoming). An Inscribed Silver Buddhist Reliquary of the Time of King Kharaosta and Prince Indravarman. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 120.0
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  19. Dirck Vorenkamp (1997). Hua-Yen Buddhism: Faith and Time in Fa-Tsang’s Thought. Dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madisonscore: 120.0
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  20. Maria Heim (2011). Buddhist Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (3):571-584.score: 114.0
    I argue that three recent studies (Imagining the Life Course, by Nancy Eberhardt; Sensory Biographies, by Robert Desjarlais; and How to Behave, by Anne Hansen) advance the field of Buddhist Ethics in the direction of the empirical study of morality. I situate their work within a larger context of moral anthropology, that is, the study of human nature in its limits and capacities for moral agency. Each of these books offers a finely grained account of particular and local Buddhist ways (...)
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  21. Surya Das (2011). Buddha Standard Time: Awakening to the Infinite Possibilities of Now. Harperone.score: 114.0
    We're all given the same twenty-four hours a day. We can spend our time feeling hurried and harried, overwhelmed by chores and demands, distracted and burned out . . . or we can awaken to Buddha Standard Time, the realm of timelessness where every choice, every action, and every breath can be one of renewal and infinite possibilities. Buddha Standard Time shares one of the great realizations of Buddhism, an insight that anyone can learn to apply. (...)
     
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  22. Gus Koehler, Radiance of Time.score: 102.0
    For Vajrayana Buddhism, the now is an interval, a boundary, a point of tension and suspension with an atmosphere of uncertainty. It is a bifurcation point of variable length; its name is “bardo.” The bardo is immersed in the conventional, or “seeming” reality. It emerges from what is called the “unstained” ultimate or primordial emptiness or “basal clear light.” Further, the ultimate (basal clear light) is not the sphere of cognition. Cognition, including cognition of time, belongs to (...)
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  23. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.score: 66.0
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, (...)
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  24. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.score: 66.0
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. (...)
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  25. C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.score: 66.0
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition (...)
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  26. Derek Allan (2013). Art and Time. Cambridge Scholars.score: 66.0
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art (...)
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  27. Maria Heim (2004). Theories of the Gift in South Asia: Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain Reflections on Dāna. Routledge.score: 66.0
    In South Asia, the period between 1100 and 1300 CE was a particularly prolific time for theorists from India's three main indigenous religions - Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism - to articulate their views on the face-to-face gift encounter. Their gift theories shaped a cosmopolitan sensibility that shared ethical and aesthetic values that reached across regional, sectarian, and religious boundaries. This book explores the ethical and social implications of unilateral gifts of esteem, offering a perceptive guide to the uniquely (...)
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  28. Brendan S. Gillon (2008). An Early Buddhist Text on Logic: Fang Bian Xin Lun. [REVIEW] Argumentation 22 (1):15-25.score: 66.0
    The Fang Bian Xin Lun is a text on Buddhist logic which is thought to be the earliest one still to be extant. It appears in Chinese only (T1632). The great Italian indologist Giuseppe Tucci, believing that the text was originally a Sanskrit text, translated it into Sanskrit and gave it the title Upāyahṛdaya. The paper provides the historical background of the development of logic in Classical India up to the time of this text, summarizes its content and translates (...)
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  29. Ulrike Roesler (2014). “As It is Said in a Sutra”: Freedom and Variation in Quotations From the Buddhist Scriptures in Early Bka'-Gdams-Pa Literature. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.score: 66.0
    The phyi dar or ‛later dissemination’ of Buddhism in Tibet is known to be a crucial formative period of Tibetan Buddhism; yet, many questions still wait to be answered: How did Tibetan Buddhist teachers of this time approach the Buddhist scriptures? Did they quote from books or from memory? Did they study Buddhism through original Sūtras or exegetical literature? To what degree was the text of the scriptures fixed and standardised before the Bka’ ’gyur and the (...)
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  30. Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.) (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. OUP USA.score: 66.0
    The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts in reliable translations, (...)
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  31. Ringu Tulku (2006). The Ri-Me Philosophy of Jamgön Kongtrul the Great: A Study of the Buddhist Lineages of Tibet. Distributed in the United States by Random House.score: 66.0
    This compelling study of the Ri-me movement and of the major Buddhist lineages of Tibet is comprehensive and accessible. It includes an introduction to the history and philosophy of the Ri-me movement; a biography of the movement's leader, the meditation master and philosopher known as Jamgon Kongtrul the Great; helpful summaries of the eight lineages' practice-and-study systems, which point out the different emphases of the schools; an explanation of the most hotly disputed concepts; and an overview of the old and (...)
     
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  32. M. T. Kapstein (2005). The Buddhist Refusal of Theism. Diogenes 52 (1):61-65.score: 60.0
    Early Buddhism was not interested in questions about existence and the nature of God, considering these unimportant in relation to the question of the release from earthly suffering which is at the heart of Buddhist soteriology. Later Buddhist thought considered theism incompatible with Buddhist doctrine, but at the same time Buddhism developed a dimension of devotion that resembled theistic faith. Conscious of their different religious heritage, Buddhist thinkers in more recent times have nevertheless embraced dialogue with monotheistic (...)
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  33. Michael Slott (2011). Can You Be a Buddhist and a Marxist? Contemporary Buddhism 12 (2):347-363.score: 60.0
    Both Buddhism and Marxism have strengths and weaknesses in helping us to understand human experiences and social problems. Rather than trying to create a synthesis of the two perspectives, I attempt to discern the elements in each which can help us experience better lives and be more effective political activists. Buddhism identifies those understandings and practices which lead to greater happiness and less suffering in response to existential challenges that we all must face as mortal human beings, irrespective (...)
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  34. Jonathan Watts (2012). The Vihara of Compassion: An Introduction to Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved in the Modern World. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):139-155.score: 60.0
    The modern hospice movement is generally understood to have begun with the founding in 1967 by Cicely Saunders of the St. Christopher's Hospice in the United Kingdom. As the movement has grown, it has inspired Buddhists in Asia to rediscover and revive their own traditions around death and caring for the terminally ill and the bereaved that date back to the time of the Buddha. In Asia and the West as well, we are witnessing the work of several groups (...)
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  35. Martin Seeger (2007). Thai Buddhist Studies and the Authority of the Pāli Canon. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (1):1-18.score: 60.0
    In Thai Buddhism, a high number of examples show that during the last 20 years or so the triangular interrelationship between hermeneutics, canonical authenticity and authority has been?more or less consciously?the subject of numerous, often very fervent debates. This has made clear the importance of the P?li canon as a centre of reference for normative and formative authority in Thai society. Also, during these debates the conservatism of Thai Therav?da, and thereby its identity, has been challenged in various ways, (...)
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  36. Aristotle Dy (2012). Chinese Buddhism and Ethnic Identity in Catholic Philippines. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (2):241-262.score: 60.0
    In the waning years of Spanish colonization in the Philippines, the ethnic Chinese there began gathering in private homes to carry out devotions to the bodhisattva Guanyin. These seeds of Chinese Buddhism in the Philippines bore fruit as temples began to be built during the American colonial period, and peaked in the decades following the Second World War. Based on fieldwork and the review of available literature, this article traces the development of Chinese Buddhism in the Philippines up (...)
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  37. Rolf Elberfeld (2004). Phänomenologie der Zeit Im Buddhismus: Methoden Interkulturellen Philosophierens. Frommann-Holzboog.score: 60.0
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  38. Frank Usarski (2013). A polêmica sobre supostos “empréstimos” do Budismo ao Cristianismo e sua relevância para a fase inicial da Ciência da Religião institucionalizada (The polemics on alleged “borrowings” of Christianity from Buddhism). DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n31p914. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (31):914-943.score: 58.0
    Na segunda década do século XX iniciou-se um debate polêmico sobre a possibilidade de que fontes budistas tenham influenciado escrituras cristãs. Nas décadas seguintes, o assunto tornou-se um tópico intensamente debatido em círculos acadêmicos da época, mas a controversa se acalmou ainda antes da Primeira Guerra Mundial. O presente artigo oferece um resumo sistemático do debate em questão e possibilita a hipótese de que em dois sentidos a discussão era sintomática para os Estudos da Religião da época. Primeiro, o debate (...)
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  39. Jeffrey Grupp, The R Theory of Time.score: 54.0
    I gave the name “R theory of <span class='Hi'>time</span>" to the Buddhist philosophy of <span class='Hi'>time</span> (and the Buddhist philosophy of atomism ) in my 2005 article in The 'Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies because after studying the currently discussed non Buddhist philosophies of <span class='Hi'>time</span> that have been offered to us by many physicists and analytic philosophers (these theories are discussed below), I found that they seemed to not agree as much as I thought theories (...)
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  40. Zhihua Yao (2007). Four-Dimensional Time in Dzogchen and Heidegger. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):512-532.score: 54.0
    : Concerning time, we have many puzzles, such as what eternity is, how it is related to the passage of time, whether the passage of time is irreversible, whether things past are no longer, whether the future is non-predictable, whether or not the present exists, and so on. This article is an attempt to discuss such experiences of the passage of time. First, a Buddhist practice in the Dzogchen tradition that deals with the experience of the (...)
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  41. Michael G. Barnhart (2012). Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.score: 54.0
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly (...)
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  42. Dan Arnold (2008). Dharmakīrti's Dualism: Critical Reflections on a Buddhist Proof of Rebirth. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1079-1096.score: 54.0
    Dharmakīrti, elaborating one of the Buddhist tradition's most complete defenses of rebirth, advanced some of this tradition's most explicitly formulated arguments for mind-body dualism. At the same time, Dharmakīrti himself may turn out to be vulnerable to some of the same kinds of arguments pressed against physicalists. It is revealing, then, that in arguing against physicalism himself, Dharmakīrti does not have available to him what some would judge to be more promising arguments for dualism (arguments, in particular, following Kant's (...)
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  43. Chien-Hsing Ho (2008). The Finger Pointing Toward the Moon: A Philosophical Analysis of the Chinese Buddhist Thought of Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):159-177.score: 54.0
    In this essay I attempt a philosophical analysis of the Chinese Buddhist thought of linguistic reference to shed light on how the Buddhist understands the way language refers to an ineffable reality. For this purpose, the essay proceeds in two directions: an enquiry into the linguistic thoughts of Sengzhao (374-414 CE) and Jizang (549-623 CE), two leading Chinese Madhyamika thinkers, and an analysis of the Buddhist simile of a moon-pointing finger. The two approaches respectively constitute the horizontal and vertical axes (...)
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  44. Teed Rockwell (2009). Minds, Intrinsic Properties, and Madhyamaka Buddhism. Zygon 44 (3):659-674.score: 54.0
    Certain philosophers and scientists have noticed that there are data that do not seem to fit with the traditional view known as the Mind/Brain Identity theory (MBI). This has inspired a new theory about the mind known as the Hypothesis of Extended Cognition (HEC). Now there is a growing controversy over whether these data actually require extending the mind out beyond the brain. Such arguments, despite their empirical diversity, have an underlying form. They all are disputes over where to draw (...)
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  45. Hye Young Won (2008). The Psychic Power of Buddha in the Early Buddhism Community. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:287-288.score: 54.0
    The author of this paper aimed to understand the early Buddhism community in its entirety by examining the individual episodes in the "Mahavagga". There is a remarkable experience of the psychic power between the Buddha and the Brahmins. They are both aware of coming across of psychic forces that entered the way to the Buddhist Community. Using the brahmins mythology as a instrument for missionary work, the early Buddhism brings people close to Buddha's community. The Buddha visited Uruvela-Kassapa (...)
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  46. Charles Muller, The Digital Dictionary of Buddhism [DDB]: Present Status and Future Developments.score: 54.0
    Over twenty-two years have passed since the beginning of the lexicographical compilation that has resulted in what is presently named the Digital Dictionary of Buddhism (DDB), and over thirteen years have passed since its installation on the WWWeb. Originally uploaded with approximately 3,200 entries, this compilation of terms, text names, person names, school names, etc., contains, at the time of this writing, over 45,000 entries, based on the contributions of 57 individuals. The DDB is also subscribed to by (...)
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  47. Chad Hansen (2011). Washing the Dust From My Mirror: The Deconstruction of Buddhism—a Response to Bronwyn Finnigan. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):160-174.score: 54.0
    I thank Professors Finnigan and Garfield (Jay) and the editors of Philosophy East and West for inviting me to join in this discussion of Chinese Buddhism. I have not taken many opportunities in my career to write about Zen Buddhism and Daoism, although I have been fascinated by their connection. I remember quite clearly a discussion I had with Jay some years back in which I broached the idea that Daoism had contributed important dialectical steps leading to the (...)
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  48. Zhihua Yao (2005, 2009). The Buddhist Theory of Self-Cognition. Routledge.score: 54.0
    This highly original work explores the concept of self-awareness or self-consciousness in Buddhist thought. Its central thesis is that the Buddhist theory of self-cognition originated in a soteriological discussion of omniscience among the Mahasamghikas, and then evolved into a topic of epistemological inquiry among the Yogacarins. To illustrate this central theme, this book explores a large body of primary sources in Chinese, Pali, Sanskrit and Tibetan, most of which are presented to an English readership for the first time. It (...)
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  49. Matthew T. Kapstein (2002). The Tibetan Assimilation of Buddhism: Conversion, Contestation, and Memory. OUP USA.score: 54.0
    Thanks to the international celebrity of the present Dalai Lama, Tibetan Buddhism is attracting more attention than at any time in its history. Although there have been numerous specialist studies of individual Tibetan texts, however, no scholarly work has as yet done justice to the rich variety of types of Tibetan discourse. This book fills this lacuna, bringing to bear the best methodological insights of the contemporary human sciences, and at the same time conveying to non-specialist readers (...)
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  50. David Montalvo (1999). The Buddhist Empiricism Thesis: An Extensive Critique. Asian Philosophy 9 (1):51 – 70.score: 54.0
    The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the claim that early Buddhism could be interpreted as an empirical philosophy. Made in a time when verifiable foundations were thought to lend credence to a system of belief, the assertion served to differentiate Buddhism from a “mystical” Hinduism and even to give it a leg up over theistic religions. The position of this paper is that the Buddhist Empiricism Thesis is most certainly false. That position is arrived (...)
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