Search results for 'Time Consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Time Consciousness (1992). Husserlian Foundations of Sartre's Treatment of Time Consciousness. In D. P. Chattopadhyaya, Lester E. Embree & Jitendranath Mohanty (eds.), Phenomenology and Indian Philosophy. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 126.score: 1740.0
  2. Jan Almäng (2013). Two Kinds of Time-Consciousness and Three Kinds of Content. Axiomathes 23 (1):61-80.score: 240.0
    This paper explores the distinction between perceiving an object as extended in time, and experiencing a sequence of perceptions. I argue that this distinction cannot be adequately described by any present theory of time-consciousness and that in order to solve the puzzle, we need to consider perceptual content as having three distinct constituents: Explicit content, which has a particular phenomenal character, modal content, or the kind of content that is contributed by the psychological mode, and implicit content, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Francisco J. Varela (1999). Present-Time Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):111-140.score: 228.0
    My purpose in this article is to propose an explicitly naturalized account of the experience of present nowness on the basis of two complementary sources: phenomenological analysis and cognitive neuroscience. What I mean by naturalization, and the role cognitive neuroscience plays will become clear as the paper unfolds, but the main intention is to use the consciousness of present time as a study case for the phenomenological framework presented by Depraz in this Special Issue.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Shaun Gallagher (1979). Suggestions Towards a Revision of Husserl's Phenomenology of Time-Consciousness. Man and World 12 (4):445-464.score: 228.0
    In this paper I offer four distinct but related suggestions: (1) That Husserl's phenomenology of time-consciousness is an adequate account of the concept of the specious present; (2) That the Querschtfftt o5 momentary phase of consdousness is genuinely only a Querschnittanskht; (3) That retention, primal-impression, and protention are functions of consciousness rather than phases or types o.f coasdousness; (4) That further conceptual clarification and terminological reformulation is needed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. James Mensch (2010). Husserl's Account of Our Consciousness of Time. Marquette University Press.score: 210.0
    Having asked, “What, then, is time?” Augustine admitted, “I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me; but if I am asked what it is and try to explain, I am baffled.” We all have a sense of time, but the description and explanation of it remain remarkably elusive. Through a series of detailed descriptions, Husserl attempted to clarify this sense of time. In my book, I trace the development of his account of our (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Francisco Varela (1999). The Specious Present: A Neurophenomenology of Time Consciousness. In Jean Petitot, Franscisco J. Varela, Barnard Pacoud & Jean-Michel Roy (eds.), Naturalizing Phenomenology. Stanford University Press. 266--314.score: 198.0
  7. Kai Vogeley & Christian Kupke (2007). Disturbances of Time Consciousness From a Phenomenological and Neuroscientific Perspective. Schizophrenia Bulletin 33 (1):157-165.score: 198.0
  8. Peter K. Mcinerney (1988). What is Still Valuable in Husserl's Analyses of Inner Time-Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy 85 (November):605-616.score: 198.0
  9. Richard M. Cobb-Stevens (1998). James and Husserl: Time-Consciousness and the Intentionality of Presence and Absence. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 198.0
  10. Shaun Gallagher (2003). Sync-Ing in the Stream of Experience: Time-Consciousness in Broad, Husserl, and Dainton. Psyche 9 (10).score: 192.0
    By examining Dainton's account of the temporality of consciousness in the context of long-running debates about the specious present and time consciousness in both the Jamesian and the phenomenological traditions, I raise critical objections to his overlap model. Dainton's interpretations of Broad and Husserl are both insightful and problematic. In addition, there are unresolved problems in Dainton's own analysis of conscious experience. These problems involve ongoing content, lingering content, and a lack of phenomenological clarity concerning the central (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. M. J. Larrabee (1993). Inside Time-Consciousness: Diagramming the Flux. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 10 (3):181-210.score: 192.0
    The usual metaphor for time is a flow. Edmund Husserl, in describing experience of our inner temporality, uses the term often: Fluss. In the final three decades of his life (1900s to 1930s), he gives us a well-articulated theory of time, especially the experience of its ongoingness and of our- selves in the processing of time. He refers to this latter, our immanent temporality, as a "flux" or flow and thus calls up the image of the river (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Gal Yehezkel (2008). Self-Consciousness, Objectivity, and Time. Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):591-611.score: 192.0
    Abstract: This article considers the conceptual connections between self-consciousness, objectivity, and time. The model of conceptual analysis employed examines the necessary conditions of the meaningfulness of expressions in language. In the course of this analysis two distinct options for the explanation of self-consciousness are identified and examined. According to the first (Strawsonian) view, self-consciousness is based upon the distinction between the self and other subjects of consciousness; according to the second (Kantian) view, self-consciousness is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Don Gifford (2011). Zones of Re-Membering: Time, Memory, and (Un)Consciousness. Rodopi.score: 192.0
    For Gifford, the profoundest explorer of the human consciousness, time, and memory is James Joyce and in its range of reference, wit, and humanity the spirit of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Yochai Ataria & Yuval Neria (2013). Consciousness-Body-Time: How Do People Think Lacking Their Body? [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (2):159-178.score: 192.0
    War captivity is an extreme traumatic experience typically involving exposure to repeated stressors, including torture, isolation, and humiliation. Captives are flung from their previous known world into an unfamiliar reality in which their state of consciousness may undergo significant change. In the present study extensive interviews were conducted with fifteen Israeli former prisoners of war who fell captive during the 1973 Yom Kippur war with the goal of examining the architecture of human thought in subjects lacking a sense of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Birgitta Dresp-Langley & Jean Durup (2012). Does Consciousness Exist Independently of Present Time and Present Time Independently of Consciousness. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):45-49.score: 192.0
    While some are currently debating whether time may or may not be an illusion, others keep devoting their time to the science of consciousness. Time as such may be seen as a physical or a subjective variable, and the limitations in our capacity of perceiving and analyzing temporal order and change in physical events definitely constrain our understanding of consciousness which, in return, constrains our conceptual under-standing of time. Temporal codes generated in the brain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John J. Drummond, James Hart & J. Claude Evans (1992). Book Reviews. Fred Kersten: 'Phenomenological Method: Theory and Practice'. Manfred Somer: 'Evidenz Im Augenblick: Eine Phanomenologie der Reinen Empfindung'. Edmund Husserl: 'On the Phenomenology of the Consciousness of Internal Time (1893-1917)', Trans. John Barnett Brough. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 9 (3).score: 186.0
    This very ambitious and remarkably detailed book examines some of the most fundamental themes in Husserl's philosophy. As is evident from the title, the book has two parts, the first of which (pp. 1-101) discusses Husserl's methodology, esp. the phenomenological reduction, and the second of which (pp. 103-347) investigates the themes of space, time, and other. These themes are selected because they are central to our mundane and embodied experience of an objective, physical and animate world.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stuart R. Hameroff (2003). Time, Consciousness, and Quantum Events in Fundamental Space-Time Geometry. In R. Buccheri (ed.), The Nature of Time: Geometry, Physics and Perception. 77-89.score: 180.0
    1. Introduction: The problems of time and consciousness What is time? St. Augustine remarked that when no one asked him, he knew what time was; however when someone asked him, he did not. Is time a process which flows? Is time a dimension in which processes occur? Does time actually exist? The notion that time is a process which "flows" directionally may be illusory (the "myth of passage") for if time did (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dan Zahavi (2011). Objects and Levels: Reflections on the Relation Between Time-Consciousness and Self-Consciousness. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 27 (1):13-25.score: 180.0
    The text surveys the development of the debate between Zahavi and Brough/Sokolowski regarding Husserl’s account of inner time-consciousness. The main arguments on both sides are reconsidered, and a compromise is proposed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Rick Grush (2006). How to, and How Not to, Bridge Computational Cognitive Neuroscience and Husserlian Phenomenology of Time Consciousness. Synthese 153 (3):417-450.score: 180.0
    A number of recent attempts to bridge Husserlian phenomenology of time consciousness and contemporary tools and results from cognitive science or computational neuroscience are described and critiqued. An alternate proposal is outlined that lacks the weaknesses of existing accounts.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dan Zahavi, Inner (Time-)Consciousness.score: 180.0
    In the introduction to Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins, Husserl remarks that “we get entangled in the most peculiar difficulties, contradictions, and confusions” (Hua X, 4) the moment we seek to account for time-consciousness. I think most scholars of Husserl’s writings on these issues would agree. Attempting to unravel the inner workings of time-consciousness can indeed easily induce a kind of intellectual vertigo. Let us consequently start with some of the basic questions that motivated Husserl’s inquiry.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John Brough (1972). The Emergence of an Absolute Consciousness in Husserl's Early Writings on Time-Consciousness. Man and World 5 (3):298-326.score: 180.0
    The collection of Edmund Husserl's sketches on time-consciousness from the years 1893-1917, edited by Rudolf Boehm and published as Volume X in the Husserliana series, affords significant new material for the study of the evolution of Husserl's thought. Specifically, the sketches suggest that in the course of analyzing the consciousness of temporal objects Husserl became convinced that a distinction must be drawn between an ultimate or absolute flow of consciousness and the immanent temporal objects or contents (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Antonio Calcagno (2012). Gerda Walther: On the Possibility of a Passive Sense of Community and the Inner Time Consciousness of Community. Symposium 16 (2):89-105.score: 180.0
    If community is determined primarily in consciousness as a mental state of oneness, can community exist when there is no accompanying mental state or collective intentionality that makes us realise that we are one community? Walther would respond affirmatively, arguing that there is a deep psychological structure of habit that allows us to continue to experience ourselves as a community. The habit of community works on all levels of our person, including our bodies, psyches and spirits (Geist). It allows (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Vessey (2007). Gadamer's Theory of Time Consciousness. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:85-89.score: 180.0
    Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics belongs to the phenomenological tradition. What is striking then is that one of the central themes in phenomenology, the nature of time consciousness, receives no sustained treatment in Gadamer's writings. It's fair to say that Gadamer is the only major figure in phenomenology not to address the issue of time at length. In this paper I argue that Gadamer does have an account of time consciousness and it can be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David Clarke (2011). Music, Phenomenology, Time Consciousness: Meditations After Husserl. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 180.0
    David Clarke examines the complex relationship between phenomenological and semiological understandings of music and consciousness through the window of time. He also explores the polar tension between Husserl's phenomenology and Derrida's critique of it, considering what the experience of music might have to offer in response to the crucial question of what is most primordial or essential to consciousness: the unceasing, differential movement of meaning, or some pure flow of subjectivity that underpins all our experience.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Vessey (2007). Gadamer's Hermeneutic Contribution to a Theory of Time-Consciousness. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2):1-7.score: 180.0
    The nature of time-consciousness is one of the central themes of phenomenology, and one that all major phenomenologists have addressed at length, except Hans-Georg Gadamer. This paper attempts to develop Gadamer’s account of time-consciousness by looking, firstly, at two essays related to the topic, and then turning to his discussion of experience in Truth and Method (1960/1991) before, finally, considering his discussion of the unique temporality of the festival in the essay “The Relevance of the Beautiful” (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. P. Novak (1996). Buddhist Meditation and Consciousness of Time. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (3):267-77.score: 174.0
  27. Frank H. Durgin & Saul Sternberg (2002). The Time of Consciousness and Vice Versa. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):284-290.score: 174.0
  28. Bruno G. Breitmeyer (2002). In Support of Pockett's Critique of Libet's Studies of the Time Course of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):280-283.score: 174.0
  29. J. Smythies (2003). Space, Time and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):47-56.score: 174.0
  30. Peter L. N. Naish (2007). Time Distortion, and the Nature of Hypnosis and Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 271-292.score: 170.0
  31. Dan Zahavi (2003). Inner Time-Consciousness and Pre-Reflective Self-Awareness. In Donn Welton (ed.), The New Husserl: A Critical Reader. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 157--180.score: 168.0
    If one looks at the current discussion of self-awareness there seems to be a general agreement that whatever valuable philosophical contributions Husserl might have made, his account of self-awareness is not among them. This prevalent appraisal is often based on the claim that Husserl was too occupied with the problem of intentionality to ever really pay attention to the issue of self-awareness. Due to his interest in intentionality Husserl took object-consciousness as the paradigm of every kind of awareness and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Henri Bergson (1913/2001). Time and Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness. Dover Publications.score: 168.0
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John Perry (2001). Time, Consciousness and the Knowledge Argument. In The Importance of Time: Proceedings of the Philosophy of Time Society, 1995-2000. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub.score: 168.0
  34. Meera Chakravorty (2007). Consciousness, Time, and Praxis. New Bharatiya Book Corp..score: 168.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Donald Ferrari & Melanie Ferrari (eds.) (2001). Consciousness in Time. Heidelberg: C Winter University Verlag.score: 168.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Gregory Nixon (ed.) (2010). Time & Consciousness: Two Faces of One Mystery. QuantumDream, Inc..score: 162.0
    In what follows, I suggest that, against most theories of time, there really is an actual present, a now, but that such an eternal moment cannot be found before or after time. It may even be semantically incoherent to say that such an eternal present exists since “it” is changeless and formless (presumably a dynamic chaos without location or duration) yet with creative potential. Such a field of near-infinite potential energy could have had no beginning and will have (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jitendra N. Mohanty (1988). Time: Linear or Cyclic, and Husserl's Phenomenology of Inner Time Consciousness. Philosophia Naturalis 25:123-130.score: 162.0
  38. David L. Thompson, The Phenomenology of Internal Time-Consciousness.score: 156.0
    Outline by Section: I. INTRODUCTION: METHOD OF PHENOMENOLOGY II. REDUCTION FROM DOGMAS III. EXAMPLES OF PHENOMENOLOGICAL DESCRIPTION OF A. SENTENCE B. MELODY C. DIAGRAM OF TIME IV. MODIFICATIONS AS MODES OF TEMPORAL STRUCTURE V. RETENTION VI. CONSTITUTION OF EXTERNAL TIME Time present and time past.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John R. Gregg, Time Consciousness and the Specious Present.score: 156.0
    Roger Penrose, in _The Emperor's New Mind_ (1989), writes about the way Mozart perceived music. Mozart did not play a piece in his mind in real time, or even speeded up, but could hold it before him all at once. We all do this, although usually for much shorter riffs than entire symphonies. I have argued that the all-at-onceness of our thoughts and perceptions is at least as inexplicable as what it is like to see red; I think the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stuart R. Hameroff (2001). Consciousness, the Brain, and Space-Time Geometry. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:74-104.score: 156.0
    What is consciousness? Conventional approaches see it as an emergent property of complex interactions among individual neurons; however these approaches fail to address enigmatic features of consciousness. Accordingly, some philosophers have contended that "qualia," or an experiential medium from which consciousness is derived, exists as a fundamental component of reality. Whitehead, for example, described the universe as being composed of "occasions of experience." To examine this possibility scientifically, the very nature of physical reality must be re-examined. We (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Yoonsuck Choe, Jaerock Kwon & Ji Ryang Chung (2012). Time, Consciousness, and Mind Uploading. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (01):257-274.score: 156.0
  42. Helga Nowotny (1989). Mind, Technologies, and Collective Time Consciousness: From the Future to the Extended Present. In J. T. Fraser (ed.), Time and Mind: Interdisciplinary Issues. International Universities Press. 197--216.score: 156.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. V. A. Reidhead & J. B. Wolford (1998). Context, Conditioning, and Meaning of Time-Consciousness in a Trappist Monastery. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.score: 156.0
  44. Holly Andersen & Rick Grush (2009). A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):277-307.score: 150.0
    William James’ Principles of Psychology, in which he made famous the ‘specious present’ doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl’s Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins, were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid’s essay ‘Memory’ in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, we trace out a line of development of ideas about (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Dan Zahavi (2004). Time and Consciousness in the Bernau Manuscripts. Husserl Studies 20 (2):99-118.score: 150.0
    Even a cursory glance in Die Bernauer Manuskripte über das Zeitbewusstsein makes it evident that one of Husserl’s major concerns in his 1917-18 reflections on time-consciousness was how to account for the constitution of time without giving rise to an infinite regress. Not only does Husserl constantly refer to this problem in Husserliana XXXIII – as he characteristically writes at one point “Überall drohen, scheint es, unendliche Regresse”(Hua 33/81) (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Holly K. Andersen Rick Grush (2009). A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 277-307.score: 150.0
    William James' Principles of Psychology , in which he made famous the "specious present" doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl's Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid's essay "Memory" in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man , we trace out a line of development of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Philip Merlan (1947). Time Consciousness in Husserl and Heidegger. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 8 (1):23-54.score: 150.0
  48. F. J. Smith (1973). Musical Sound as a Model for Husserlian Intuition and Time-Consciousness. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 4 (1):271-296.score: 150.0
  49. J. N. Findlay (1975). Husserl's Analysis of The Inner Time-Consciousness. The Monist 59 (1):3-20.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Nicolas de Warren (2005). The Significance of Stern's "Präsenzzeit" for Husserl's Phenomenology of Inner Time-Consciousness. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5 (1):2005.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000