Search results for 'Time History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  22
    Katherine Clarke (2008). Making Time for the Past: Local History and the Polis. Oxford University Press.
    This book has two main and connected themes - the conception and articulation of time in the Greek world and the creation of history, especially in the context of the Greek city. Both how time is expressed and how the past is presented have often been seen as reflections of society. By looking at the construction of the past through the medium of local historiography, where we can view these issues in the relatively restricted world of individual (...)
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  2.  5
    P. J. Corfield (2007). Time and the Shape of History. Yale University Press.
    This ambitious book explores the relationship between time and history and shows how an appreciation of long-term time helps to make sense of the past. The book is devoted to a wide-ranging analysis of the way different societies have conceived and interpreted time, and it develops a theory of the threefold roles of continuity, gradual change, and revolution which together form a "braided" history. Linking the interpretative chapters are intriguing brief expositions on time travel, (...)
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  3.  10
    George Parkin Grant (1969). Time as History. [Toronto]Canadian Broadcasting Corp..
    In Time as History, a collection of his 1969 Massey lectures, George Grant reviews the thought of Nietzsche and concludes that the conception of time as history ...
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  4.  31
    Géza Kállay (2011). At T-Time, the Inchoative Nick of Time, and “Statements About the Past”: Time and History in the Analytic Philosophy of Language. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):322-351.
    The paper, drawing on articles by J. M. E. McTaggart, G. E. Moore, D. Davidson, J. L. Austin, B. Russell, A. J. Ayer and G. E. M. Anscombe, argues that the philosophy of language in the analytic tradition has developed an “inchoative“ view of time, and history is a problem as regards the existence of events in the past and how these events can be known. An alternative view is hinted at through the work of L. Wittgenstein and (...)
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  5.  6
    David Carr (1991). Time, Narrative, and History. Indiana University Press.
    "For description and defense of the narrative configurations of everyday life, and of the practical and social character of those narratives, there is no better treatment than Time, Narrative, and History.... a clear, judicious, and truthful account, provocative from beginning to end." —Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology "... a superior work of philosophy that tells a unique and insightful story about narrative." —Quarterly Journal of Speech.
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  6.  5
    Hannah Spahn (2011). Thomas Jefferson, Time, and History. University of Virginia Press.
    Time -- Rational time -- Paternal punctuality -- Sentimental time -- History -- Teaching by examples -- Seduction by example -- Beyond example? -- Epilogue: "I leave it, therefore, to time".
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  7.  1
    Deborah E. Schechter & Cyrilla M. Francis (2010). A Life History Approach to Understanding Youth Time Preference. Human Nature 21 (2):140-164.
    Following from life history and attachment theory, individuals are predicted to be sensitive to variation in environmental conditions such that risk and uncertainty are internalized by cognitive, affective, and psychobiological mechanisms. In turn, internalizing of environmental uncertainty is expected to be associated with attitudes toward risk behaviors and investments in education. Native American youth aged 10–19 years (n = 89) from reservation communities participated in a study examining this pathway. Measures included family environmental risk and uncertainty, present and future (...)
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  8.  24
    Lonnie Golden (2009). A Brief History of Long Work Time and the Contemporary Sources of Overwork. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):217 - 227.
    What are some of the key historical trends in hours of work per worker in US? What economic, social-psychological, organizational and institutional forces determine the length of individuals' working hours? How much of the trend toward longer working hours among so many workers may be attributable to workers' preferences, workplace incentives or employers' constraints? When can work become overwork or workaholism – an unforced addiction to incessant work activity which risk harm to workers, families or even economies? The first part (...)
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  9.  19
    Najeeb Awad (2011). Time/History, Self-Disclosure and Anticipation: Pannenberg, Heidegger and the Question of Metaphysics. Sophia 50 (1):113-133.
    This essay examines Wolfhart Pannenberg’s defense of metaphysics’ foundational importance for philosophy and theology. Among all the modern philosophers whose claims Pannenberg challenges, Martin Heidegger’s discourse against Western metaphysics receives the major portion of criticism. The first thing one concludes from this criticism is an affirmation of a wide intellectual gap that separates Pannenberg’s thought from Heidegger’s, as if each stands at the very opposite corner of the other’s school of thought. The questions this essay tackles are: is this seemingly (...)
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  10.  11
    Lynn Hunt (2008). Measuring Time, Making History. Central European University Press.
    Hunt asks a series of related questions about time in history. Why is time now again on the agenda, for historians and more generally in Western culture?
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  11.  20
    Jörn Rüsen (ed.) (2007). Time and History: The Variety of Cultures. Berghahn Books.
    This series aims at bridging the gap between historical theory and the study of historical memory as well as western and non-western concepts, for which this ...
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  12. Herbert Wildon Carr (1918). 'Time' and 'History' in Contemporary Philosophy with Special Reference to Bergson and Croce. Published for the British Academy by H. Milford, Oxford University Press].
     
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  13.  17
    J. J. A. Mooij (2005). Time and Mind: The History of a Philosophical Problem. Brill.
  14. Eric Sean Nelson (2001). Time, History, and Facticity in Dilthey and Heidegger. Dissertation, Emory University
    This dissertation is an investigation of the questions of time, history, and facticity in Dilthey and Heidegger. It is an exploration of the contextual character of experience and the scope and limits of understanding and interpretation. In particular, this work considers their historical and temporal character and relation to facticity. Facticity is that which escapes and resists interpretation, narration, and understanding. In Heidegger's language, facticity indicates the "thrownness" and "uncanniness" of existence which throws the "subject" and its construction (...)
     
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  15.  11
    Maria das Graças de Souza (2006). Propitious Occasion, Nefastous Occasion: Time, History and Political Action in Rousseau. Trans/Form/Ação 29 (2):249-256.
    I first examine two classical images of time that can somehow be identified in the works of Rousseau, and next analyze how they function in his formulation of a theory of history. Finally, I show how such conceptions of time and history affect the question of political action. The first, more well known, is the image of time that devours everything; the second, that I will examine more thoroughly, is the image of time as (...)
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  16.  2
    Mark S. Cladis (2009). The Discovery and Recovery of Time in History and Religion. History and Theory 48 (3):283-294.
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  17.  14
    Manuel Dries (2008). Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism Introduction to Nietzsche on Time and History. In Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter 1.
    Why are we still intrigued by Nietzsche? This chapter argues that sustained interest stems from Nietzsche’s challenge to what we might call the ‘staticism’ inherent in our ordinary experience. Staticism can be defined, roughly speaking, as the view that the world is a collection of enduring, re-identifiable objects that change only very gradually and according to determinate laws. The chapter discusses Nietzsche’s rejection of the remnants of staticism in Hegel and Schopenhauer. It outlines why Nietzsche deems belief in any variant (...)
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  18. George Grant (2008). Time as History. In Barbara Ward (ed.), More Lost Massey Lectures: Recovered Classics From Five Great Thinkers. Distributed in the United States by Publishers Group West
     
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  19.  12
    Tom Bunyard (2011). Debord, Time and History. Historical Materialism 19 (1):3-36.
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  20. Agnes Heller (2002). The Time is Out of Joint Shakespeare as Philosopher of History.
     
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  21. Nathan Rotenstreich (1987). Time and Meaning in History. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 101:1-220.
     
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  22.  7
    Robert J. O'Hara (2006). Essay-Review of Christian's 'Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History'. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (1): 117–120.
    This well-written volume is an introduction, not to world history, but to the special genre of "Big History," as the subtitle indicates. Christian and his fellow big historians, reacting against popular scepticism toward "master narratives," seek to create a new class of grand works that incorporate not only the history of human society, but also of the Earth, its life, and the universe as a whole. Specialists in any of the fields covered by the volume may find (...)
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  23.  10
    Leonard Krieger (1989). Time's Reasons: Philosophies of History Old and New. University of Chicago Press.
    This original work caps years of thought by Leonard Krieger about the crisis of the discipline of history. His mission is to restore history's autonomy while attacking the sources of its erosion in various "new histories," which borrow their principles and methods from disciplines outside of history. Krieger justifies the discipline through an analysis of the foundations on which various generations of historians have tried to establish the coherence of their subject matter and of the convergence of (...)
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  24. Jon Agar, William J. Ashworth & Jeff Hughes (2000). BJHS Special Issue: On Time: History, Science and Commemoration. British Journal for the History of Science 33 (4):385-385.
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  25. John J. Drummond (2000). Time, History, and Tradition. In John B. Brough (ed.), The Many Faces of Time. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub 127--147.
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  26.  21
    Alexandra Lianeri (ed.) (2011). The Western Time of Ancient History: Historiographical Encounters with the Greek and Roman Pasts. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction. Unfounding times: the idea and ideal of ancient history in Western historical thought Alexandra Lianeri; Part I. Theorising Western Time: Concepts and Models: 1. Time's authority François Hartog; 2. Exemplarity and anti-exemplarity in Early Modern Europe Peter Burke; 3. Greek philosophy and Western history: a philosophy-centred temporality Giuseppe Cambiano; 4. Historiography and political theology: Momigliano and the end of history Howard Caygill; Part II. Ancient History and Modern Temporalities: 5. (...)
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  27. María Inés Mudrovcic (2014). Time, History, and Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 8 (2):217-242.
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  28. Rajesh Sampath (1999). Four-Dimensional Time: Twentieth Century Philosophies of History in Europe. International Scholars Publications.
    This work is a two-division study of twentieth century philosophies of history in Europe. Fields engaged in the study are transcendental philosophy, speculative metaphysics, theology, historiographical theory, and intellectual history. The main question concerns the historical finitude of History and its temporal horizon. The work explores the unsolved consequences of G.W.F. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit and Martin Heidegger's Being and Time in twentieth-century German and French philosophies of History.
     
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  29. Romila Thapar (1996). Time as a Metaphor of History: Early India: The Krishna Bharadwaj Memorial Lecture. OUP India.
    This essay examines the link between time and history through the use of cyclic and linear concepts of time. While the former occurs in a cosmological context, the latter is found in familiar historical forms. The author argues for the existence of historical consciousness in early India, on the evidence of early texts.
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  30. Gary Zatzman (2009). Intangibles in the Big Picture: The Delinearised History of Time. Nova Science Publishers, Inc..
    Introduction -- Newton's laws of motion versus nature's -- The continuity conundrum -- Continuity and linearity : confusion twice confounded -- From illusions of precision and reproducibility in natural science to delusions of normalcy in social science -- Mutability -- Laws of motion : natural law and questions of mutability -- Essential and intangible role of temporal factors : a detailed example -- Detaching Canada's East Coast Fishery from its history : causes and consequences -- Mishandling temporal factors : (...)
     
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  31.  4
    Bennett Gilbert (forthcoming). On Breaking Up Time, or, Perennialism as Philosophy of History. New Content is Available for Journal of the Philosophy of History.
    _ Source: _Page Count 22 Current and recent philosophy of history contemplates a deep change in fundamental notions of the presence of the past. This is called breaking up time. The chief value for this change is enhancing the moral reach of historical research and writing. However, the materialist view of reality that most historians hold cannot support this approach. The origin of the notion in the thought of Walter Benjamin is suggested. I propose a neo-idealist approach called (...)
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  32.  16
    Manuel Dries (ed.) (2008). Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Nietzsche's Critique of Staticism Manuel Dries Part 1: Time, History, Method Nietzsche's Cultural Criticism and his Historical Methodology 23 Andrea Orsucci Thucydides, Nietzsche, and Williams 35 Raymond Geuss The Late Nietzsche's Fundamental Critique of Historical Scholarship 51 Thomas H. Brobjer Part II: Genealogy, Time, Becoming Nietzsche's Timely Genealogy: An Exercise in Anti-Reductionist Naturalism 63 Tinneke Beeckman From Kantian Temporality to Nietzschean Naturalism 75 R. Kevin Hill Nietzsche's Problem of the Past 87 John Richardson Towards Adualism: Becoming and (...)
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  33.  11
    Alpana Sharma Knippling (1993). On Empire, Time, History; Or. What Does the Post- in Postcolonial Signify? Semiotics:249-254.
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  34.  16
    Gabrielle M. Spiegel (2002). Memory and History: Liturgical Time and Historical Time. History and Theory 41 (2):149–162.
    This article investigates the differential structure and representation of time in memory and history. It examines two moments in Jewish historical thought--in the Middle Ages, and in works written within and after the Holocaust--and demonstrates the fundamentally liturgical nature of Jewish historical memory in selected texts from these two periods. Following the groundbreaking work of Yerushalmi, it seeks to demonstrate that for Jews, historical experience is incorporated into the cyclical reenactment of paradigmatic events in Jewish sacred ritual. Recent (...)
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  35.  11
    Edward Q. Wang (2002). Time, History, and Dao: Zhang Xuecheng, and Martin Heidegger. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):251-276.
  36.  15
    Roy W. Perrett (1999). History, Time, and Knowledge in Ancient India. History and Theory 38 (3):307–321.
    The lack of interest in history in ancient India has often been noted and contrasted with the situation in China and the West. Notwithstanding the vast body of Indian literature in other fields, there is a remarkable dearth of historical writing in the period before the Muslim conquest and an associated indifference to historiography. Various explanations have been offered for this curious phenomenon, some of which appeal to the supposed currency of certain Indian philosophical theories. This essay critically examines (...)
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  37.  3
    Carl Pletsch (1977). History and Friedrich Nietzsche's Philosophy of Time. History and Theory 16 (1):30-39.
    Though Nietzsche never developed a theory of history, his comments on time yield a radical approach to historical interpretation. Central to this philosophy is the concept of eternal recurrence. Time, with neither boundary nor purpose, returns from the past to repeat itself in its same form. This generates a psychological and moral problem for men, as it fails to provide the elements of meaning which Nietzsche considered essential to the human psyche. Men survive the aimlessness of (...) by living in the unhistorical consciousness of the immediate present. Nietzsche's ideal is the suprahistorical man, whose awareness of history, and his disgust with it, lead him to find meaning in the structure of time-a structure of meaninglessness. The value system of history is this will to power and precludes the extension of historical judgment to situations beyond the sphere of inquiry. (shrink)
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  38.  10
    Frances Flanagan (2008). Time, History, and Fascism in Bertolucci's Films. The European Legacy 4 (1):89-98.
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  39.  9
    Pierre Force (2011). The Teeth of Time: Pierre Hadot on Meaning and Misunderstanding in the History of Ideas1. History and Theory 50 (1):20-40.
    The French philosopher and intellectual historian Pierre Hadot (1922-2010) is known primarily for his conception of philosophy as spiritual exercise, which was an essential reference for the later Foucault. An aspect of his work that has received less attention is a set of methodological reflections on intellectual history and on the relationship between philosophy and history. Hadot was trained initially as a philosopher and was interested in existentialism as well as in the convergence between philosophy and poetry. Yet (...)
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  40.  9
    Mark B. Okrent (1982). Time, History and Development in Hegel. International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2):57-76.
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  41.  1
    John Hall (1980). The Time of History and the History of Times. History and Theory 19 (2):113-131.
    History, more than other subjects, is confronted with the need to understand the nature of social time. Braudel, representing the objectivist approach, argued that there exists a universal objective world-time permeated by diverse tempi and rhythms. Althusser criticized this view by stating that each level within society has its own set of temporal relations. However, Althusser's argument requires not the rejection, but the further understanding of subjectivity and intersubjectivity. In order for his concepts to have meaning, they (...)
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  42.  4
    Axel Körner (2011). The Experience of Time as Crisis: On Croce's and Benjamin's Concept of History. Intellectual History Review 21 (2):151-169.
    In the early decades of the twentieth century the experience of time as crisis became the catalyst for a fundamental reorientation in the relationship between historical materialism and idealism, leading to the rejection of simplistic mechanical concepts of historical time. This reorientation represents a turning point in the history of European ideas, clearly evident in the work of two major thinkers of this period, usually associated with opposing political ideologies: the Marxist theorist Walter Benjamin and the liberal (...)
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  43.  2
    George Devereux (1975). Time. History Versus Chronicle. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 3 (2):281-292.
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  44. L. B. C. (1967). The Triumph of Time: A Study of the Victorian Concepts of Time, History, Progress, and Decadence. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 20 (3):537-538.
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  45. George Devereux (1975). Time: History Versus Chronicle; Socialization as Cultural Preexperience. Ethos 3 (2):281-292.
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  46. Eric Hirsch & Sharon Macdonald (2007). Introduction, Creativity and the Passage of Time: History, Tradition and the Life-Course. In Elizabeth Hallam & Tim Ingold (eds.), Creativity and Cultural Improvisation. Berg 185--192.
     
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  47. Teresa Pękala (2009). Philosophical Contexts of the Attitude of Contemporary Artists to Time, History and Tradition. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 11:131-142.
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  48.  9
    Bennett Gilbert (forthcoming). On Breaking Up Time, or, Perennialism as Philosophy of History. Brill.
    _ Source: _Page Count 22 Current and recent philosophy of history contemplates a deep change in fundamental notions of the presence of the past. This is called breaking up time. The chief value for this change is enhancing the moral reach of historical research and writing. However, the materialist view of reality that most historians hold cannot support this approach. The origin of the notion in the thought of Walter Benjamin is suggested. I propose a neo-idealist approach called (...)
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  49. Peter Beilbarz (1995). Reviews : C.L.R. James, World Revolution 1917-1936: The Rise and Fall of the Communist International (Humanities Press, 1993); Michel Beaud, Socialism in the Crucible of History (Humanities Press, 1993); Cornelius Castoriadis, Political and Social Writings, Volume 3, 1961- 1979 (University of Minnesota Press, 1993); Moishe Postone, Time, Labor, and Social Domination—A Reinterpretation of Marx's Critical Tbeory (Cambridge University Press, 1993). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 40 (1):133-138.
    Reviews : C.L.R. James, World Revolution 1917-1936: The Rise and Fall of the Communist International ; Michel Beaud, Socialism in the Crucible of History ; Cornelius Castoriadis, Political and Social Writings, Volume 3, 1961- 1979 ; Moishe Postone, Time, Labor, and Social Domination—A Reinterpretation of Marx's Critical Tbeory.
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  50. Huw Price, Hawking's History of Time: A Plea for the Missing Page.
    One of the outstanding achievements of recent cosmology has been to offer some prospect of a unified explanation of temporal asymmetry. The explanation is in two main parts, and runs something like this. First, the various asymmetries we observe are all thermodynamic in origin – all products of the fact that we live in an epoch in which the universe is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Second, this thermodynamic disequilibrium is associated with the condition of the universe very soon after the (...)
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