Search results for 'Time in art' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel L. Tate (2012). In the Fullness of Time: Gadamer on the Temporal Dimension of the Work of Art. Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):92-113.score: 567.0
    Abstract In Gadamer's later writings on art, his investigation into the being of the work exploits the temporal resonance of the concept of performative enactment ( Vollzug ), which displaces the priority of play ( Spiel ) in his earlier account. Drawing upon Heidegger, Gadamer deploys the concepts of tarrying ( Verweilen ) and the while ( die Weile ) to elucidate the temporality of the work of art as an event of being. On the one hand, tarrying describes the (...)
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  2. Yve Lomax (2005). Sounding the Event: Escapades in Dialogue and Matters of Art, Nature and Time. I.B. Tauris.score: 504.0
    What constitutes an event? Propelled by this question, Sounding the Event encounters a variety of theories and a host of issues that have implications for not only conceptions of nature and becoming, subject and substance but also practices of time, art and photography. This book explores dialogue in its writing and as it encounters the philosophical utterances of Michel Serres, Isabelle Stengers, Alfred North Whitehead, Jean-Franbliogçois Lyotard, Maurice Blanchot, Gilles Deleuze and Fbliogelix Guattari, and Alain Badiou.
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  3. Paul Mattick (2003). Art in its Time: Theories and Practices of Modern Aesthetics. Routledge.score: 486.0
    Art In Its Time takes a close look at the way in which art has become integral to the everyday 'ordinary' life of modern society. It explores the prevalent notion of art as transcending its historical moment, and argues that art cannot be separated from the everyday as it often provides material to represent social struggles and class, to explore sexuality, and to think about modern industry and our economic relationships.
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  4. Simon Haines (2007). Time in Philosophy and Art. In Jan Lloyd Jones (ed.), Art and Time. Australian Scholarly Publishing. 13.score: 471.0
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  5. Susan Tridgell (2007). Retrieving the Past, Transforming the Future: Time and Art in Autobiographies of Childhood and Incarceration. In Jan Lloyd Jones (ed.), Art and Time. Australian Scholarly Publishing. 190.score: 471.0
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  6. Leonard Shlain (1991/1993). Art & Physics: Parallel Visions in Space, Time, and Light. Quill/W. Morrow.score: 465.0
    Art interprets the visible world, physics charts its unseen workings--making the two realms seem completely opposed. But in Art & Physics, Leonard Shlain tracks their breakthroughs side by side throughout history to reveal an astonishing correlation of visions. From teh classical Greek sculptors to Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns, and from Aristotle to Einstein, aritsts have foreshadowed the discoveries of scientists, such as when Money and Cezanne intuited the coming upheaval in physics that Einstein would initiate. In this lively and (...)
     
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  7. Sachchidanand Hiranand Vatsyayan (1981). A Sense of Time: An Exploration of Time in Theory, Experience, and Art. Oxford University Press.score: 453.0
     
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  8. Helen Beebee (2013). Michelle Bastian Completed Her Ph. D. In Philosophy at the University of New South Wales. She is Currently a Chancellor's Fellow at the Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh. Her Work Focuses on the Use of Time in Social Practises of Inclusion and Exclusion. [REVIEW] In Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.), Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Oup Usa. 261.score: 444.0
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  9. Manuela Friedrich (1997). " Reaction Time" in the Neural Network Module ART 1. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 56:215-238.score: 444.0
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  10. Ewa Wójtowicz (2001). Time and Real - Time in Online Art. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 3:215-228.score: 444.0
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  11. Giorgio Torraca (1994). Science and Conservation: The Work of Art in the Flow of Time. World Futures 40 (1):129-132.score: 441.0
    The technology of conservation needs the best possible knowledge of the artifact and its changes in time. Scientists lack the deep sensorial knowledge of the object that the restorer, on the contrary, possesses.
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  12. William M. Hawley (2012). Actors and Acting in Shakespeare's Time: The Art of Stage Playing. By John H. Astington. The European Legacy 17 (3):412 - 413.score: 435.0
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 3, Page 412-413, June 2012.
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  13. G. R. Levy & H. A. Groenewegen-Frankfort (1953). Arrest and Movement. An Essay on Space and Time in the Representational Art of the Ancient Near East. Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:179.score: 435.0
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  14. Vjačeslav V. Ivanov (1973). The Category of Time in Twentieth-Century Art and Culture. Semiotica 8 (1):1-45.score: 435.0
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  15. Lynn Ransom (2006). Bianca Kühnel, The End of Time in the Order of Things: Science and Eschatology in Early Medieval Art. Regensburg: Schnell & Sterner, 2003. Pp. 384; 174 Black-and-White and Color Figures. €61.68. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):220-222.score: 435.0
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  16. Sue Vice (2001). “It's About Time”: The Chronotope of the Holocaust in Art Spiegelman's Maus'. In Jan Baetens (ed.), The Graphic Novel. Leuven University Press. 47--60.score: 435.0
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  17. Kia Lindroos (1998). Now-Time Image-Space: Temporalization of Politics in Walter Benjamin's Philosophy of History and Art. University of Jyväskylä.score: 423.0
     
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  18. Carolyn Drake (2001). Form in Time: The Perceptual Discovery of Art. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (11):463-464.score: 414.0
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  19. Eleonora Jedlińska (2011). Homelessness of Art Work / Homelessness of Memory: Moshe Kupferman\'s The Rift in Time. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 13:75-94.score: 414.0
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  20. Gabriel Motzkin (1997). The Intuition of Time Between Science and Art History in the Early Twentieth Century. Science in Context 10 (1).score: 414.0
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  21. Antonio Negri & Max Henninger (2007). Art and Culture in the Age of Empire and the Time of the Multitudes. Substance 36 (1):48-55.score: 405.0
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  22. H. J. B. & Martin P. Nilsson (1921). Primitive Time-Reckoning. A Study in the Origins and First Development of the Art of Counting Time Among the Primitive and Early Culture Peoples. Journal of Hellenic Studies 41:158.score: 405.0
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  23. Jonathan Dollimore (2003). Art in Time of War: Towards a Contemporary Aesthetic. In John J. Joughin & Simon Malpas (eds.), The New Aestheticism. Manchester University Press. 3642.score: 405.0
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  24. Max Henninger (2007). Introduction to Antonio Negri's "Art and Culture in the Age of Empire and the Time of the Multitudes". Substance 36 (1):47-47.score: 405.0
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  25. Virginia Roehrig Kaufmann (1990). Joachim M. Plotzek, Andachtsbücher des Mittelalters Aus Privatbesitz. Cologne: Stadt Köln and Schnütgen Museum, 1987. Pp. 250; 358 Color Plates, 2 Black-and-White Plates. Roger S. Wieck, Time Sanctified: The Book of Hours in Medieval Art and Life. With Essays by Lawrence R. Poos, Virginia Reinburg, and John Plummer. New York: George Braziller, in Association with the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore, 1988. Pp. 230; 40 Color Plates, 132 Black-and-White Plates. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (2):485-489.score: 405.0
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  26. John Paul Ricco (2014). The Decision Between Us: Art and Ethics in the Time of Scenes. University of Chicago Press.score: 405.0
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  27. Ivan Sanders (1978). Has Shaped Their Lives and Art Ever Since. Tamas Kabdebo is a Poet, Translator and Novelist Who Makes His Home in England. His Minden Ido\(Every Time) is a Tribute to the Impulsive Heroism of Youth and the Wistful Acquies-Cence of Middle Age. [REVIEW] Kriterion 175:8.score: 405.0
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  28. Charlie Gere (2006). Art, Time, and Technology. Berg.score: 345.0
    This book explores how the practice of art, in particular of avant-garde art, keeps our relation to time, history and even our own humanity open. Examining key moments in the history of both technology and art from the beginnings of industrialisation to today, Charlie Gere explores both the making and purpose of art and how much further it can travel from the human body.
     
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  29. Derek Allan (2013). Art and Time. Cambridge Scholars.score: 333.0
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art (...)
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  30. L. G. Underwood (2007). Now Bounded, Now Immeasurable: Perspectives on Time in Disability, in Suffering and at End of Life. Medical Humanities 33 (1):11-15.score: 297.0
    Novels, films, poems and visual art can expand our view of time in ways that can be useful in dealing with disability, suffering and end of life. In particular, they can reveal more complex ways to view time. This can be effective both for the person suffering and for those who care for them. Our typical ways of viewing time include linear sequential clock time, which progresses in an evenly parsed, ordered, unidirectional way, and memory or (...)
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  31. Etienne Souriau (1949). Time in the Plastic Arts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 7 (4):294-307.score: 294.0
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  32. Jeoraldean McClain (1985). Time in the Visual Arts: Lessing and Modern Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (1):41-58.score: 294.0
  33. Krzysztof Cichoń (2001). Ypostesij, Metron, Nohema. Three Approaches to Representing Time in Visual Arts. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 3:68-90.score: 294.0
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  34. Stephen Snyder (2010). Arthur Danto’s Andy Warhol: The Embodiment of Theory in Art and the Pragmatic Turn. Leitmotiv:135-151.score: 291.0
    Arthur Danto’s recent book, Andy Warhol, leads the reader through the story of the iconic American’s artistic life highlighted by a philosophical commentary, a commentary that merges Danto’s aesthetic theory with the artist himself. Inspired by Warhol’s Brillo Box installation, art that in Danto’s eyes was indiscernible from the everyday boxes it represented, Danto developed a theory that is able to differentiate art from non-art by employing the body of conceptual art theory manifest in what he termed the ‘artworld’. The (...)
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  35. Wilfried van Damme (2010). Ernst Grosse and the "Ethnological Method" in Art Theory. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):302-312.score: 291.0
    Why are the Germans good at music, whereas the Dutch excel in painting? What are the reasons for the outstanding draftsmanship of Australian Aboriginals, and why does this skill seem absent among West African peoples, who appear concerned rather with sculpture? Could it be that the Japanese do not share the European preference for symmetry in decorative art? Moreover, why do tastes in the visual arts, music, and literature change so noticeably throughout history? Is it possible that, despite differences across (...)
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  36. Charles Biederman & David Bohm (1999). Bohm-Biederman Correspondence: Creativity in Art and Science. Routledge.score: 291.0
    "It was sheer chance that I encountered David Bohm's writing in 1958 ... I knew nothing about him. What struck me about his work and prompted my initial letter was his underlying effort to seek for some larger sense of reality, which seemed a very humanized search." - Charles Biederman, from the foreword of the book This book marks the beginning of a four thousand page correspondence between Charles Biederman, founder of Constructivism in the 1930s, and David Bohm the prestigious (...)
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  37. Elizabeth Grierson (2011). Art and Creativity in the Global Economies of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):336-350.score: 279.0
    Creativity: what might this mean for art and art educators in the creative economies of globalisation? The task of this discussion is to look at the state of creativity and its role in education, in particular art education, and to seek some understanding of the register of creativity, how it is shaped, and how legitimated in the globalised world dominated by input-output, means-end, economically driven thinking, expectations and demands. With the help of Heidegger some crucial questions are raised, such as: (...)
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  38. David H. Fleming (2013). Charcoal Matter with Memory: Images of Movement, Time and Duration in the Animated Films of William Kentridge. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):402-423.score: 279.0
    In his temporal philosophy based on the writing of Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze describes duration ( durée ) as a becoming that endures in time. Reifications of this complex philosophical concept become artistically expressed, I argue, in the form and content of South African artist William Kentridge's series of 'charcoal drawings for projection.' These exhibited art works provide intriguing and illuminating 'philosophical' examples of animated audio-visual media, which expressively plicate distinct images of movement and time. The composition of (...)
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  39. Meredith Tromble (2009). The Advent of Chemical Symbolism in the Art of Sonya Rapoport. Foundations of Chemistry 11 (1):51-60.score: 279.0
    This paper explores the use of chemical symbolism in works by the new media artist Sonya Rapoport, with a focus on the pivotal Cobalt series from the late 1970s. These works, drawings on computer printouts generated by research at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, respond to experiments in nuclear chemistry. They mark the beginning of three productive decades in which Rapoport produced a variety of images related to chemistry in her work. She states, “I looked for authentic research projects that were (...)
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  40. Anjan Chakravartty, Truth and Representation in Science: Two Inspirations From Art.score: 267.0
    Realists regarding scientific knowledge – those who think that our best scientific representations truly describe both observable and unobservable aspects of the natural world – have special need of a notion of approximate truth. Since theories and models are rarely considered true simpliciter, the realist requires some means of making sense of the claim that they may be false and yet close to the truth, and increasingly so over time. In this paper, I suggest that traditional approaches to approximate (...)
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  41. Martin Coleman (2008). The Meaninglessness of Coming Unstuck in Time. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (4):pp. 681-698.score: 261.0
    The views of John Dewey and Kurt Vonnegut are often criticized for opposite reasons: Dewey’s philosophy is said to be naively optimistic while Vonnegut’s work is read as cynical. The standard debates over the views of the two thinkers cause readers to overlook the similarities in the way each approaches tragic experience. This paper examines Dewey’s philosophic account of time and meaning and Vonnegut’s use of time travel in his autobiographical novel Slaughterhouse-Five to illustrate these similarities. This essay (...)
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  42. Stephen J. Goldberg (2010). The Gestural Imagination: Toward a Phenomenology of Duration in the Art of Chinese Writing. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):211-221.score: 261.0
    This essay represents a reflection on the nature of shufa, the Chinese “art of writing,” and its ontological grounding as a continuous, “durational transcription,” of an inscriptional event, producing a phenomenology of “viewing.” This distinguishes it from ordinary writing (xiezi) in which attention is focused on the lexical meaning of the written characters (i.e., an experience of “reading”). Viewing a calligraphic inscription actually unfolding in time (i.e., as a dynamical structure or “temporal object event”), however, raises an interesting theoretical (...)
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  43. Christopher S. Nwodo (1976). The Work of Art in Heidegger: A World Disclosure. Philosophy and Social Criticism 4 (1):61-73.score: 261.0
    The purpose of the article is to determine the nature of the artwork and the scope of the world revealed therein. the artwork is that by which art becomes actual. it is that in which art is expressed. however, it is more than an object of aesthetic experience. it is the revelation of a people's world. here the world means the world of a particular people at a particular time, the cultural and "intellectual atmosphere" of a historical people. a (...)
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  44. Isabelle Travis (2011). 'Is Getting Well Ever An Art?': Psychopharmacology and Madness in Robert Lowell's Day by Day. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):315-324.score: 261.0
    On the publication of Robert Lowell’s Life Studies in 1959, some critics were shocked by the poet’s use of seemingly frank autobiographical material, in particular the portrayal of his hospitalizations for bipolar disorder. During the late fifties and throughout the sixties, a rich vein, influenced by Lowell , developed in American poetry. Also during this time, the nascent science of psychopharmacology competed with and complemented the more established somatic treatments, such as psychosurgery, shock treatments, and psychoanalytical therapies. The development (...)
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  45. Tiger C. Roholt (2013). Key Terms in Philosophy of Art. Bloomsbury Academic.score: 261.0
    Key Terms in Philosophy of Art offers a clear, concise and accessible introduction to a vital sub-field of philosophy. The book offers a comprehensive overview of the key terms, concepts, thinkers and major works in the history of this key area of philosophical thought. Ideal for first-year students coming to the subject for the first time, Key Terms in Philosophy of Art will serve as the ideal companion to the study of this fascinating subject. -/- Tiger C. Roholt provides (...)
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  46. John A. Sweeney (2011). Burqas in Back Alleys: Street Art, Hijab, and the Reterritorialization of Public Space. Continent 1 (4).score: 261.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 253—278. A Sense of French Politics Politics itself is not the exercise of power or struggle for power. Politics is first of all the configuration of a space as political, the framing of a specific sphere of experience, the setting of objects posed as "common" and of subjects to whom the capacity is recognized to designate these objects and discuss about them.(1) On April 14, 2011, France implemented its controversial ban of the niqab and burqa , commonly (...)
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  47. Ricardo Luiz Silveira da Costa (2012). The Aesthetics of the Body in the Philosophy and Art of the Middle Ages: Text and Image. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):161-178.score: 261.0
    A ideia de beleza - e sua consequente fruição estética - variou conforme as transformações das sociedades humanas, no tempo. Durante a Idade Média, coexistiram diversas concepções de qual era o papel do corpo na hierarquia dos valores estéticos, tanto na Filosofia quanto na Arte. Nossa proposta é apresentar a estética do corpo medieval que alguns filósofos desenvolveram em seus tratados (particularmente Isidoro de Sevilha, Hildegarda de Bingen, João de Salisbury, Bernardo de Claraval e Tomás de Aquino), além de algumas (...)
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  48. Eliel Saarinen (1948/1985). The Search for Form in Art and Architecture. Dover Publications.score: 246.0
    Important philosophical volume by foremost architectural conceptualist emphasizes organic design, interrelated study of all arts. He provides introductory, retrospective, and prospective analysis, explores the creative instinct, organic order, form and vitality, form and time, form and logic, form and function, the dogmatic, mechanized, and the creative mind, and more.
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  49. Geoffrey Borny (2007). The Operation of Time in Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie. In Jan Lloyd Jones (ed.), Art and Time. Australian Scholarly Publishing. 131.score: 246.0
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  50. Andrew Macklin (2007). New Ideas of Wonder: Haptic Time in Organic Architecture. In Jan Lloyd Jones (ed.), Art and Time. Australian Scholarly Publishing. 256.score: 246.0
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