Search results for 'Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott' (try it on Scholar)

998 found
Sort by:
  1. Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott (2000). Vagueness in Law. Oxford University Press.score: 502.5
    Vagueness in law can lead to indeterminacies in legal rights and obligations. This book responds to the challenges that those indeterminacies pose to theories of law and adjudication.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 502.5
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Timothy A. O. Endicott (1998). Herbert Hart and the Semantic Sting. Legal Theory 4 (3):283-300.score: 120.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Timothy Endicott (2011). Morality and the Making of Law: Four Questions. Jurisprudence 1 (2):267-275.score: 120.0
    I address four questions that arise out of Nigel Simmonds's book, Law as a Moral Idea : Is politics a moral idea too? Is there any such thing as law making? Is there a right answer to every legal dispute? What justifies a judicial decision? To each question I propose an answer that shares much with Simmonds's views, but diverges. Simmonds is right to call law a 'moral idea', and that implies a connection between law and a moral ideal; in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Timothy A. O. Endicott (1994). Putting Interpretation in its Place. Law and Philosophy 13 (4):451 - 479.score: 120.0
    What can a philosophical analysis of the concept of interpretation contribute to legal theory? In his recent book,Interpretation and Legal Theory, Andrei Marmor proposes a complex and ambitious analysis as groundwork for his positivist assault on “interpretive” theories of law and of language. I argue (i) that the crucial element in Marmor's analysis of interpretation is his treatment of Ludwig Wittgenstein's remarks on following rules, and (ii) that a less ambitious analysis of interpretation than Marmor's can take better advantage of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Timothy Endicott (2001). Are There Any Rules? Journal of Ethics 5 (3):199-219.score: 120.0
    Widespread, deep controversy as to the content of the law of a community is compatible with the view that the law is a system of rules. I defend that view through a critique of Ronald Dworkin's discussion of Riggs v. Palmer 22 N.E. 188 (1889). Dworkin raised an important challenge for jurisprudence: to account for the fact that legal rights and duties are frequently controversial. I offer an explanation of the possibility of deep disagreement about the application of social (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Timothy Endicott, Law and Language. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Timothy Endicott (2007). Adjudication and the Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (2):311-326.score: 120.0
    It can be compatible with justice and the rule of law for a court to impose new legal liabilities retrospectively on a defendant. But judges do not need to distinguish between imposing a new liability, and giving effect to a liability that the defendant had at the time of the events in dispute. The distinction is to be drawn by asking which of the court's reasons for decision the institutions of the legal system had already committed the courts to act (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Timothy Endicott (2013). The Irony of Law. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. 327.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Timothy Endicott (2003). The Reason of the Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 48 (1):83-106.score: 120.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Timothy Endicott (1997). Vagueness and Legal Theory. Legal Theory 3 (1):37.score: 120.0
    The use of vague language in law has important implications for legal theory. Legal philosophers have occasionally grappled with those implications, but they have not come to grips with the characteristic phenomenon of vagueness: the Sorites paradox. I discuss the paradox, and claim that it poses problems for some legal theorists (David Lyons, Hans Kelsen, and especially, Ronald Dworkin). I propose that a good account of vagueness will have three consequences for legal theory. (edited).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Timothy Endicott (2001). Preface. Legal Theory 7 (4):369-369.score: 120.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Timothy Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. OUP Oxford.score: 120.0
    The late Jim Harris' theory of the science of law, and his theoretical work on human rights and property, have been a challenge and stimulus to legal scholars for the past twenty-five years. This collection of essays, originally conceived as a festschrift and now offered to the memory of a greatly admired scholar, assesses Harris' contribution across many fields of law and legal philosophy. The chapters are written by some of the foremost specialists writing today, and reflect the wide range (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ron Endicott, PHI 205 Spring 08, Sec.003 Dr. Ronald Endicott.score: 120.0
    Course Description: the course is divided into 3 parts: Philosophy of Religion, Moral Philosophy, and a Sampler Platter of Other Philosophical Issues. Learning Outcomes: by the end of the semester, students should be able to identify and evaluate the views listed in the course outline below. Grading: there are 3 exams (tf, mc, and essay) and one short paper, 3-4 pages, each counting 25% of the course grade. Class participation decides borderline cases. Scale: 80-82 (B), 83-86 (B), 87- 89 (B+), (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Timothy Endicott (2003). Raz on Gaps. In Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas W. Pogge (eds.), Rights, Culture and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Timothy Endicott (2006). The Infant in the Snow. In J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.), Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Timothy A. O. Endicott (1999). The Impossibility of the Rule of Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (1):1-18.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Timothy Endicott (2010). The Logic of Freedom and Power. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Timothy Endicott & Herbert Hart (1998). The Semantic Sting. Legal Theory 4.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Timothy Endicott (2011). Vagueness and Law. In Giuseppina Ronzitti (ed.), Vagueness: A Guide. Springer Verlag. 171--191.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Airey Immediate (2012). Timothy Endicott. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Stamatia Portanova (2009). Act III A Digital Deleuze : Performance and New Media. Like a Prosthesis : Critical Performance à Digital Deleuze / Timothy Murray ; Performance as the Distribution of Life : From Aeschylus to Chekhov to VJing Via Deleuze and Guattari / Andrew Murphie ; The 'Minor' Arithmetic of Rhythm : Imagining Digital Technologies for Dance. In Laura Cull (ed.), Deleuze and Performance. Edinburgh University Press.score: 36.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ann Chinnery (forthcoming). On Timothy Findley's The Wars and Classrooms as Communities of Remembrance. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-9.score: 18.0
    In this paper I explore the connection between narrative ethics and the increasing emphasis on historical consciousness as a way to cultivate moral responsibility in history education. I use Timothy Findley’s World War I novel, The Wars, as an example of how teachers might help students to see history neither simply as a collection of artefacts from the past, nor as an effort to construct an objective view about what went on in those other times and places, but rather (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David Saunders & Ian Hunter (2003). Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'. History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.score: 18.0
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the core (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Timothy Chan (ed.) (2013). The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    What is belief? "Beliefs aim at truth" is the commonly accepted starting point for philosophers who want to give an adequate account of this fundamental state of mind, but it raises as many questions as it answers. For example, in what sense can beliefs be said to have an aim of their own? If belief aims at truth, does it mean that reasons to believe must also be based on truth? Must beliefs be formed on the basis of evidence alone? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Andrew Collier, Margaret Scotford Archer & William Outhwaite (eds.) (2004). Defending Objectivity: Essays in Honour of Andrew Collier. Routledge.score: 15.0
    Andrew Collier is the boldest defender of objectivity - in science, knowledge, thought, action, politics, morality and religion. In this tribute and acknowledgement of the influence his work has had on a wide readership, his colleagues show that they have been stimulated by his thinking and offer challenging responses. This wide-ranging book covers key areas with which defenders of objectivity often have to engage. Sections are devoted to the following: 'objectivity of value', 'objectivity and everyday knowledge', 'objectivity in political (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg (2011). Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.score: 15.0
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für Philosophie (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Thomas Jeannot (2010). Reclaiming Marx's 'Capital': A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency, Andrew Kliman, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2007. Historical Materialism 18 (4):189-206.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Andrew Botterell (2005). Review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 114:125-128.score: 15.0
    A review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto: Thoroughly Modern Materialism (Cambridge University Press, 2003).
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.) (2012). The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    Machine generated contents note: 'The sublime'. A short introduction to a long history Timothy M. Costelloe; Part I. Philosophical History of the Sublime: 1. Longinus and the ancient sublime Malcolm Heath; 2...And the beautiful? revisiting Edmund Burke's 'double aesthetics' Rodolphe Gasche; 3. The moral source of the Kantian sublime Melissa Meritt; 4. Imagination and internal sense: the sublime in Shaftesbury, Reid, Addison, and Reynolds Timothy M. Costelloe; 5. The associative sublime: Kames, Gerrard, Alison, and Stewart Rachel Zuckert; 6. (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Timothy Williamson (2009). The Philosophy of Philosophy • by Timothy Williamson • Blackwell, 2007. X + 332 Pp. £ 15.99 Paper: Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (1):99-100.score: 12.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Timothy M. Costelloe & Andrew Chignell (2011). A Dialogue Concerning Aesthetics and Apolaustics. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):v-xvi.score: 12.0
    A debate between two aestheticians concerning the relative influence of Scottish and German philosophers on the contemporary discipline. -/- .
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Andrei Marmor & Scott Soames (eds.) (2011). Philosophical Foundations of Language in the Law. Oxford University Press, Usa.score: 12.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. The Value of Vagueness, Timothy Endicott -- 2. Vagueness and the Guidance of Action, Jeremy Waldron -- 3. What Vagueness and Inconsistency tell us about Interpretation, Scott Soames -- 4. Textualism and the Discovery of Rights, John Perry -- 5. The Intentionalism of Textualism, Stephen Neale -- 6. Can the Law Imply More than It Says? On some pragmatic aspects of Strategic Speech, Andrei Marmor -- 7. Modeling Legal Rules, Richard Holton -- (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. William O. Stephens (2011). If Friendship Hurts, an Epicurean Deserts : A Reply to Andrew Mitchell. In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi. 7.score: 12.0
    In “Friendship Amongst the Self-Sufficient: Epicurus” (this Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2, June 2001), Andrew Mitchell explores the Epicurean view of the relationship between self-sufficiency and friendship by contrasting it with the views of Aristotle and the Stoics. Epicurus, Aristotle, and the Stoics do indeed have interestingly different views on friendship that are well worth comparing. Yet Mitchell’s characterization of Aristotelian friendship is misleading, his account of Stoic friendship is inaccurate, and his interpretation of Epicurean friendship is curiously imaginative (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2011). Discussion A Symposium on Nigel Simmonds's Law as a Moral IdeaIntroduction. Jurisprudence 1 (2):241-244.score: 12.0
    This issue of Jurisprudence features a symposium on Nigel Simmonds's Law as a Moral Idea (Oxford, 2007). There are essays by John Finnis, John Gardner, Timothy Endicott and a Reply by Nigel Simmonds. The papers are based on presentations given at a panel discussion in Oxford in December 2009. In this 'Introduction' Pavlos Eleftheriadis outlines the main themes of the book, namely that (a) the idea of law is intrinsically moral, (b) the distinction between analytical and normative jurisprudence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Emil Andersson (2011). Political Liberalism and the Interests of Children: A Reply to Timothy Michael Fowler. Res Publica 17 (3):291-296.score: 12.0
    Timothy Michael Fowler has argued that, as a consequence of their commitment to neutrality in regard to comprehensive doctrines, political liberals face a dilemma. In essence, the dilemma for political liberals is that either they have to give up their commitment to neutrality (which is an indispensible part of their view), or they have to allow harm to children. Fowler’s case for this dilemma depends on ascribing to political liberals a view which grants parents a great degree of freedom (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2012). The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism and the Potential Adverse Effects for Boys and Girls with Autism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):93-103.score: 12.0
    Autism, typically described as a spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in verbal ability and social reciprocity as well as obsessive or repetitious behaviours, is currently thought to markedly affect more males than females. Not surprisingly, this encourages a gendered understanding of the Autism Spectrum. Simon Baron-Cohen, a prominent authority in the field of autism research, characterizes the male brain type as biased toward systemizing. In contrast, the female brain type is understood to be biased toward empathizing. Since persons with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.score: 12.0
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such technologies (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Douglas Kellner, Review-Article on Andrew Feenberg, Questioning Technology. New York and London, Routledge, 1999.score: 12.0
    Andrew Feenberg's Questioning Technology (1999) is his third book in a series of studies which undertake to provide critical theoretical and democratic political perspectives to engage technology in the contemporary era. In Critical Theory of Technology (1991), Feenberg draws on neo-Marxian and other critical theories of technology, especially the Frankfurt School, to criticize determinist and essentialist theories. In this ground-breaking work (which will go into its second edition in 2001), he discusses both how the labor process, science, and technology (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Gideon Calder & Andrew Collier (2009). Values and Ontology: An Interview with Andrew Collier, Part. Journal of Critical Realism 8 (1):63-90.score: 12.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2008). Who's to Regret, What's to Regret? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):42 – 43.score: 12.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Andrew Collier & Gideon Calder (2008). Philosophy and Politics: An Interview with Andrew Collier, Part. Journal of Critical Realism 7 (2):276-296.score: 12.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Brendan Balcerak Jackson (2009). Understanding and Semantic Structure: Reply to Timothy Williamson. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):337-343.score: 12.0
    In his essay ‘“Conceptual Truth”’, Timothy Williamson (2006) argues that there are no truths or entailments that are constitutive of understanding the sentences involved. In this reply I provide several examples of entailment patterns that are intuitively constitutive of understanding in just the way that Williamson rejects, and I argue that Williamson’s argument does nothing to show otherwise. Williamson bolsters his conclusion by appeal to a certain theory about the nature of understanding. I argue that his theory fails to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Wayne C. Myrvold (1996). Bayesianism and Diverse Evidence: A Reply to Andrew Wayne. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):661-665.score: 12.0
    Andrew Wayne (1995) discusses some recent attempts to account, within a Bayesian framework, for the "common methodological adage" that "diverse evidence better confirms a hypothesis than does the same amount of similar evidence" (112). One of the approaches considered by Wayne is that suggested by Howson and Urbach (1989/1993) and dubbed the "correlation approach" by Wayne. This approach is, indeed, incomplete, in that it neglects the role of the hypothesis under consideration in determining what diversity in a body of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Sebastian P. Brock (1999). Two Letters of the Patriarch Timothy From the Late Eighth Century on Translations From Greek. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 9 (02):233-.score: 12.0
    Among the extensive correspondence of Timothy I, Catholicos of the Church of the East, are two letters which refer to his collobaration in a translation of Aristotle's Topics into Syriac and Arabic, commissioned by the Caliph al-Mahdī. An annotated English translation of both letters is provided.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Carson Strong (2002). Response to ???May a Woman Clone Herself???? By Jean E. Chambers (CQ Vol 10, No 2) and ???Entitlement to Cloning??? By Timothy F. Murphy (CQ Vol 8, No 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):76-82.score: 12.0
    Jean E. Chambers and Timothy F. Murphy responded to my article and extended the debate over human cloning in interesting ways. I had argued that none of the objections to cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer are successful in the context of infertile couples who use cloning to have genetically related children, assuming the issue of safety is overcome by scientific advances.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2011). Review of Disability Bioethics: Moral Bodies, Moral Difference by Jackie Leach Scully. [REVIEW] Hypatia 26 (3):651-655.score: 12.0
  48. Maksymilian T. Madelr, The Problem of Normativity in Contemporary Legal Theory.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the problem of normativity in contemporary legal theory, paying particular attention to the relationship between the conception of the problem and related explanations of behaviour. The first part of the paper shows how the problem of normativity, conceived of as a matter of determining how legal norms function as reasons for action, is linked to an explanation of behaviour that is posited or assumed to be capable of being guided by reasons. More importantly for the purposes of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Timothy Williams (1999). Logic and Existence: Timothy Williams. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):181-203.score: 12.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Cynthia Willett (2010). Response to Bill Martin and Andrew Cutrofello on Irony in the Age of Empire. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (1):96-99.score: 12.0
    What a pleasure to have such subtle thinkers and scholars as Bill Martin and Andrew Cutrofello reflect on the relation of irony and comedy to politics and philosophy through their commentary on my new book. To set the tone, Martin begins with a koan, or a parody of one, “What if a tree told a joke in the woods and there was no one there to hear it?” He means, I believe, to sound a warning on the limits of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 998