Search results for 'Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jahanabadi Hossein, Carroll Timothy, Cresswell Andrew & De Rugy Aymar (2015). Constraints Upon Learning Novel Muscle Activation Patterns After Virtual Tendon Transfer. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  2.  53
    Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott (2000). Vagueness in Law. Oxford University Press.
    Vagueness in law can lead to indeterminacies in legal rights and obligations. This book responds to the challenges that those indeterminacies pose to theories of law and adjudication.
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  3. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  4. Timothy Endicott (2003). The Reason of the Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 48 (1):83-106.
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  5.  3
    Timothy Endicott (2011). Vagueness and Law. In Giuseppina Ronzitti (ed.), Vagueness: A Guide. Springer Verlag 171--191.
  6.  17
    Timothy Endicott, Law and Language. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  7.  60
    Timothy A. O. Endicott (1998). Herbert Hart and the Semantic Sting. Legal Theory 4 (3):283-300.
    Even to disagree, we need to understand each other. If I reject what you say without understanding you, we will only have the illusion of a disagreement. You will be asserting one thing and I will be denying another. Even to disagree, we need some agreement.
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  8.  29
    Timothy A. O. Endicott (1994). Putting Interpretation in its Place. Law and Philosophy 13 (4):451 - 479.
    What can a philosophical analysis of the concept of interpretation contribute to legal theory? In his recent book,Interpretation and Legal Theory, Andrei Marmor proposes a complex and ambitious analysis as groundwork for his positivist assault on “interpretive” theories of law and of language. I argue (i) that the crucial element in Marmor's analysis of interpretation is his treatment of Ludwig Wittgenstein's remarks on following rules, and (ii) that a less ambitious analysis of interpretation than Marmor's can take better advantage of (...)
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  9.  26
    Timothy Endicott (2001). Are There Any Rules? Journal of Ethics 5 (3):199-219.
    Widespread, deep controversy as to the content of the law of a community is compatible with the view that the law is a system of rules. I defend that view through a critique of Ronald Dworkin's discussion of Riggs v. Palmer 22 N.E. 188. Dworkin raised an important challenge for jurisprudence: to account for the fact that legal rights and duties are frequently controversial. I offer an explanation of the possibility of deep disagreement about the application of social rules, which (...)
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  10.  21
    Timothy Endicott (1997). Vagueness and Legal Theory. Legal Theory 3 (1):37.
    The use of vague language in law has important implications for legal theory. Legal philosophers have occasionally grappled with those implications, but they have not come to grips with the characteristic phenomenon of vagueness: the Sorites paradox. I discuss the paradox, and claim that it poses problems for some legal theorists (David Lyons, Hans Kelsen, and especially, Ronald Dworkin). I propose that a good account of vagueness will have three consequences for legal theory. (edited).
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  11.  37
    Timothy Endicott (2010). Morality and the Making of Law: Four Questions. Jurisprudence 1 (2):267-275.
    I address four questions that arise out of Nigel Simmonds's book, Law as a Moral Idea : Is politics a moral idea too? Is there any such thing as law making? Is there a right answer to every legal dispute? What justifies a judicial decision? To each question I propose an answer that shares much with Simmonds's views, but diverges. Simmonds is right to call law a 'moral idea', and that implies a connection between law and a moral ideal; in (...)
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  12. Timothy Endicott (2003). Raz on Gaps. In Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas W. Pogge (eds.), Rights, Culture and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. OUP Oxford
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  13. Timothy Endicott (2010). The Logic of Freedom and Power. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. OUP Oxford
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  14.  5
    Timothy A. O. Endicott (1999). The Impossibility of the Rule of Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (1):1-18.
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  15.  1
    Timothy Endicott (2001). Preface. Legal Theory 7 (4):369-369.
    Preface to a Symposium on Vagueness and Law at Columbia University Law School on September 24 and 25, 1999. The purpose of the seminar was to provide an opportunity for philosophers of law, philosophers of language, and philosophers of logic to discuss problems about vagueness that are currently under debate in all three areas.
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  16.  2
    Timothy Endicott (2013). The Irony of Law. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press 327.
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  17.  1
    Timothy Endicott (2007). Adjudication and the Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (2):311-326.
    It can be compatible with justice and the rule of law for a court to impose new legal liabilities retrospectively on a defendant. But judges do not need to distinguish between imposing a new liability, and giving effect to a liability that the defendant had at the time of the events in dispute. The distinction is to be drawn by asking which of the court's reasons for decision the institutions of the legal system had already committed the courts to act (...)
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  18. Timothy Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. OUP Oxford.
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  19. Timothy Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The late Jim Harris' theory of the science of law, and his theoretical work on human rights and property, have been a challenge and stimulus to legal scholars for the past twenty-five years. This collection of essays, originally conceived as a festschrift and now offered to the memory of a greatly admired scholar, assesses Harris' contribution across many fields of law and legal philosophy. The chapters are written by some of the foremost specialists writing today, and reflect the wide range (...)
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  20. Timothy Endicott (2006). The Infant in the Snow. In J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.), Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press
     
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  21. Timothy Endicott & Herbert Hart (1998). The Semantic Sting. Legal Theory 4.
     
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  22. Thomas R. Giblin, N. J. Colletta, Robert N. Grunewald, Gerald W. McLaughlin, Ronald W. Sealey, Loyd D. Andrew, Fred A. Snyder, Otto F. Kraushaar, John B. Peper, Fred C. Rankine, Timothy Boggs & Albert S. Kahn (1974). Book Review Section 5. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 5 (4):282-292.
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  23.  1
    Airey Immediate (2012). Timothy Endicott. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge
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  24. Stamatia Portanova (2009). Act III A Digital Deleuze : Performance and New Media. Like a Prosthesis : Critical Performance À Digital Deleuze / Timothy Murray ; Performance as the Distribution of Life : From Aeschylus to Chekhov to VJing Via Deleuze and Guattari / Andrew Murphie ; The 'Minor' Arithmetic of Rhythm : Imagining Digital Technologies for Dance. In Laura Cull (ed.), Deleuze and Performance. Edinburgh University Press
     
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  25.  5
    Timothy S. Miller (2005). Andrew Dalby, Flavours of Byzantium. Totnes, Eng.: Prospect Books, 2003. Pp. 268. £25. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (4):1256-1257.
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  26. Timothy Bayne (1997). Alison Gopnik and Andrew N. Meltzoff, Words, Thoughts, and Theories Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (4):254-256.
     
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  27.  1
    Timothy L. Brownlee (2015). Adorno and the Ends of Philosophy Andrew Bowie Cambridge: Polity Press, 2013; X + 206 Pp.; $24.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 54 (2):387-389.
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  28. Timothy Bayne (1997). Alison Gopnik and Andrew N. Meltzoff, Words, Thoughts, and Theories. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 17:254-256.
     
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  29. Timothy J. Reiss (2005). Andrew Barnaby; Lisa J. Schnell.Literate Experience: The Work of Knowing in Seventeenth‐Century English Writing.Xiv + 243 Pp., Index. New York: Palgrave, 2002. $55. [REVIEW] Isis 96 (3):430-431.
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  30. Timothy Chan (ed.) (2013). The Aim of Belief. Oxford University Press.
    What is belief? "Beliefs aim at truth" is the commonly accepted starting point for philosophers who want to give an adequate account of this fundamental state of mind, but it raises as many questions as it answers. For example, in what sense can beliefs be said to have an aim of their own? If belief aims at truth, does it mean that reasons to believe must also be based on truth? Must beliefs be formed on the basis of evidence alone? (...)
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  31. Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.) (2012). The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 'The sublime'. A short introduction to a long history Timothy M. Costelloe; Part I. Philosophical History of the Sublime: 1. Longinus and the ancient sublime Malcolm Heath; 2...And the beautiful? revisiting Edmund Burke's 'double aesthetics' Rodolphe Gasche; 3. The moral source of the Kantian sublime Melissa Meritt; 4. Imagination and internal sense: the sublime in Shaftesbury, Reid, Addison, and Reynolds Timothy M. Costelloe; 5. The associative sublime: Kames, Gerrard, Alison, and Stewart Rachel Zuckert; 6. (...)
     
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  32. Timothy M. Costelloe & Andrew Chignell (2011). A Dialogue Concerning Aesthetics and Apolaustics. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):v-xvi.
    A debate between two aestheticians concerning the relative influence of Scottish and German philosophers on the contemporary discipline. -/- .
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  33.  20
    Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2009). Autism, Empathy and Questions of Moral Agency. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (2):145-166.
    In moral psychology, it has long been argued that empathy is a necessary capacity of both properly developing moral agents and developed moral agency . This view stands in tension with the belief that some individuals diagnosed with autism—which is typically characterized as a deficiency in social reciprocity —are moral agents. In this paper we propose to explore this tension and perhaps trouble how we commonly see those with autism. To make this task manageable, we will consider whether high functioning (...)
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  34.  73
    Andrei Marmor & Scott Soames (eds.) (2011). Philosophical Foundations of Language in the Law. Oxford University Press, Usa.
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. The Value of Vagueness, Timothy Endicott -- 2. Vagueness and the Guidance of Action, Jeremy Waldron -- 3. What Vagueness and Inconsistency tell us about Interpretation, Scott Soames -- 4. Textualism and the Discovery of Rights, John Perry -- 5. The Intentionalism of Textualism, Stephen Neale -- 6. Can the Law Imply More than It Says? On some pragmatic aspects of Strategic Speech, Andrei Marmor -- 7. Modeling Legal Rules, Richard Holton -- (...)
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  35.  50
    Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such technologies (...)
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  36.  14
    Andrew Melnyk (2010). What Do Philosophers Know? A Critical Study of Williamson's "The Philosophy of Philosophy". [REVIEW] Grazer Philosophische Studien 80 (1):297-307.
    This is a critical notice of Timothy Williamson's, The Philosophy of Philosophy (Blackwell, 2007). It focuses on criticizing the book's two main positive proposals: that we should “replace true belief by knowledge in a principle of charity constitutive of content”, and that “the epistemology of metaphysically modal thinking is tantamount to a special case of the epistemology of counterfactual thinking”.
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  37.  63
    Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2012). The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism and the Potential Adverse Effects for Boys and Girls with Autism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):93-103.
    Autism, typically described as a spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in verbal ability and social reciprocity as well as obsessive or repetitious behaviours, is currently thought to markedly affect more males than females. Not surprisingly, this encourages a gendered understanding of the Autism Spectrum. Simon Baron-Cohen, a prominent authority in the field of autism research, characterizes the male brain type as biased toward systemizing. In contrast, the female brain type is understood to be biased toward empathizing. Since persons with (...)
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  38.  19
    Hrafn Asgeirsson (2015). On the Instrumental Value of Vagueness in the Law. Ethics 125 (2):425-448.
    It is natural to think that law ought not to be vague. After all, law is supposed to guide conduct, and vague law seems poorly suited to do that. Contrary to this common impression, however, a number of authors have argued that vagueness in the law is sometimes a good thing, because it is a means to achieving certain valuable legislative ends. In this article, I argue that many authors—including Timothy Endicott and Jeremy Waldron—wrongly associate vagueness with instrumental (...)
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  39.  24
    Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  40. Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (2002). Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Democracy and the Claims of Nature, the leading thinkers in the fields of environmental, political, and social theory come together to discuss the tensions and sympathies of democratic ideals and environmental values. The prominent contributors reflect upon where we stand in our understanding of the relationship between democracy and the claims of nature. Democracy and the Claims of Nature bridges the gap between the often competing ideals of the two fields, leading to a greater understanding of each for the (...)
     
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  41.  28
    Ann Chinnery (2014). On Timothy Findley’s The Wars and Classrooms as Communities of Remembrance. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):587-595.
    In this paper I explore the connection between narrative ethics and the increasing emphasis on historical consciousness as a way to cultivate moral responsibility in history education. I use Timothy Findley’s World War I novel, The Wars, as an example of how teachers might help students to see history neither simply as a collection of artefacts from the past, nor as an effort to construct an objective view about what went on in those other times and places, but rather (...)
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  42.  19
    Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2008). Who's to Regret, What's to Regret? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):42 – 43.
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  43.  42
    Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2010). A Symposium on Nigel Simmonds's Law as a Moral Idea. Jurisprudence 1 (2):241-244.
    This issue of Jurisprudence features a symposium on Nigel Simmonds's Law as a Moral Idea. There are essays by John Finnis, John Gardner, Timothy Endicott and a Reply by Nigel Simmonds. The papers are based on presentations given at a panel discussion in Oxford in December 2009. In this 'Introduction' Pavlos Eleftheriadis outlines the main themes of the book, namely that the idea of law is intrinsically moral, the distinction between analytical and normative jurisprudence is false and law (...)
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  44.  7
    Nicola J. Pitchford, Walter J. B. van Heuven, Andrew N. Kelly, Taoli Zhang & Timothy Ledgeway (2012). Vision, Development, and Bilingualism Are Fundamental in the Quest for a Universal Model of Visual Word Recognition and Reading. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):300-301.
    We agree with many of the principles proposed by Frost but highlight crucial caveats and report research findings that challenge several assertions made in the target article. We discuss the roles that visual processing, development, and bilingualism play in visual word recognition and reading. These are overlooked in all current models, but are fundamental to any universal model of reading.
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  45.  13
    Jeremy Fernando (2011). Bang Bang - A Response to Vincent W.J. Van Gerven Oei. Continent 1 (3):224-228.
    On 22 July, 2011, we were confronted with the horror of the actions of Anders Behring Breivik. The instant reaction, as we have seen with similar incidents in the past—such as the Oklahoma City bombings—was to attempt to explain the incident. Whether the reasons given were true or not were irrelevant: the fact that there was a reason was better than if there were none. We should not dismiss those that continue to cling on to the initial claims of a (...)
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  46.  6
    Hrafn Asgeirsson (2012). Vagueness, Comparative Value, and the "Lawmakers' Challenge". Archiv für Rechts- Und Sozialphilosophie 98 (3):299-316.
    In "The Value of Vagueness," Timothy Endicott argues that vague law can be better than precise law. I think he is in many respects correct, but will suggest that we modify and supplement his framework in order to get a firmer grip on what I call the Lawmakers' Challenge: the scenario in which lawmakers find themselves when they must determine whether the consequences of precision are worse than the consequences of vagueness. This will allow us to identify several (...)
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  47.  7
    Timothy O'riordan & Andrew Jordan (1995). The Precautionary Principle in Contemporary Environmental Politics. Environmental Values 4 (3):191 - 212.
    In its restless metamorphosis, the environmental movement captures ideas and transforms them into principles, guidelines and points of leverage. Sustainability is one such idea, now being reinterpreted in the aftermath of the 1992 Rio Conference. So too is the precautionary principle. Like sustainability, the precautionary principle is neither a well defined principle nor a stable concept. It has become the repository for a jumble of adventurous beliefs that challenge the status quo of political power, ideology and civil rights. Neither concept (...)
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  48.  7
    David Saunders & Ian Hunter (2003). Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'. History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the core (...)
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  49.  4
    John Wortley (2006). Relics and the Great Church. Byzantinische Zeitschrift 99 (2):631-647.
    Until its despoliation by the warriors of the Fourth Crusade in 1204, the relic-collection of Constantinople was the largest and most illustrious of relic-collections in Christendom. “Collection” is not an altogether appropriate word however, for the relics were unevenly distributed among the various shrines of the city. First among these stood the so-called “Lighthouse” church [του Φάϱου] of the Theotokos within the Great Palace, probably founded by the iconoclast emperor Constantine V Kopronymos. This was the imperial relic-collection par excellence, housing (...)
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    Eric A. Weiss, Justin Leiber, Judith Felson Duchan, Mallory Selfridge, Eric Dietrich, Peter A. Facione, Timothy Joseph Day, Johan M. Lammens, Andrew Feenberg, Deborah G. Johnson, Daniel S. Levine & Ted A. Warfield (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (1):109-155.
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