Search results for 'Timothy Backous' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  35
    Timothy Backous & William C. Graham (eds.) (1997). Common Good, Uncommon Questions: A Primer in Moral Theology. Liturgical Press.
    Common Good, Uncommon Questions explores a variety of moral issues.
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  2.  28
    Ann Chinnery (2014). On Timothy Findley’s The Wars and Classrooms as Communities of Remembrance. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):587-595.
    In this paper I explore the connection between narrative ethics and the increasing emphasis on historical consciousness as a way to cultivate moral responsibility in history education. I use Timothy Findley’s World War I novel, The Wars, as an example of how teachers might help students to see history neither simply as a collection of artefacts from the past, nor as an effort to construct an objective view about what went on in those other times and places, but (...)
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  3. Timothy Williamson & Paal Antonsen (2010). Modality & Other Matters: An Interview with Timothy Williamson. Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):16-29.
    An interview with Timothy Williamson on Modality and other matters. Williams is asked three main questions: the first about the difference between philosophical and non-philosophical knowledge, the second concerns the epistemology of modality, and the third is on the emerging metaphysical picture.
     
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  4. Brendan Balcerak Jackson (2009). Understanding and Semantic Structure: Reply to Timothy Williamson. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):337-343.
    In his essay ‘“Conceptual Truth”’, Timothy Williamson (2006) argues that there are no truths or entailments that are constitutive of understanding the sentences involved. In this reply I provide several examples of entailment patterns that are intuitively constitutive of understanding in just the way that Williamson rejects, and I argue that Williamson’s argument does nothing to show otherwise. Williamson bolsters his conclusion by appeal to a certain theory about the nature of understanding. I argue that his theory fails (...)
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  5. T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.) (2010). The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
    Timothy Smiley has made ground-breaking contributions to modal logic, free logic, multiple-conclusion logic, and plural logic; he has illuminated Aristotle’s syllogistic, the ideas of logical form and consequence, and the distinction between assertion and rejection; and his debunking work on the theory of descriptions is a tour de force. In this volume, an international roster of contributors discuss Smiley's work to date; their essays will be of significant interest to those working across the logical spectrum—in philosophy of language, philosophical (...)
     
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  6. Timothy D. Sisk (2012). Tom Farer and Timothy D. Sisk. In Timothy J. Sinclair (ed.), Global Governance. Polity Press 18--4.
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  7. Timothy Williamson (2009). The Philosophy of Philosophy • by Timothy Williamson • Blackwell, 2007. X + 332 Pp. £ 15.99 Paper: Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (1):99-100.
    The book is primarily an essay on the epistemology of the sort of armchair knowledge that we can hope to achieve in philosophy. The possibility of such knowledge is not to be explained by reinterpreting philosophical questions as questions about words or concepts. Although there are philosophical questions about words and concepts, most philosophical questions are not about words or concepts: they are, just as they seem to be, about the things, many of them independent of us, to which the (...)
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  8.  63
    Emil Andersson (2011). Political Liberalism and the Interests of Children: A Reply to Timothy Michael Fowler. Res Publica 17 (3):291-296.
    Timothy Michael Fowler has argued that, as a consequence of their commitment to neutrality in regard to comprehensive doctrines, political liberals face a dilemma. In essence, the dilemma for political liberals is that either they have to give up their commitment to neutrality (which is an indispensible part of their view), or they have to allow harm to children. Fowler’s case for this dilemma depends on ascribing to political liberals a view which grants parents a great degree of (...)
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  9. Hilary Kornblith (2009). Timothy Williamson's the Philosophy of Philosophy. Analysis 69 (1):109-116.
    Timothy Williamson's new book, The Philosophy of Philosophy, has a number of central themes. The very idea that philosophy has a method which is different in kind from the sciences is one Williamson rejects. “… the common assumption of philosophical exceptionalism is false. Even the distinction between the a priori and the a posteriori turns out to obscure underlying similarities”. Although Williamson sees the book as “a defense of armchair philosophy”, he also argues that “the differences in subject (...)
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  10. David Efird (2010). Is Timothy Williamson a Necessary Existent? In Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.), Modality: Metaphysics, Logic, and Epistemology. OUP Oxford
    Timothy Williamson (2002) has offered an argument for the claim that, necessarily, he exists, that is, that he is a necessary existent.1 Though this argument has attracted a great deal of attention (e.g., Rumfitt 2003 and Wiggins 2003), I present a new argument for the same conclusion which reveals a new way of denying the soundness of Williamson’s argument, one which denies not only that it is necessary that he exists but also that there are any true necessities about (...)
     
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  11.  14
    Timothy Williamson, B. O. Chen & Koji Nakatogawa (2009). Thinking Deeply, Contributing Originally: An Interview with Timothy Williamson (Special Contribution). Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 18:57-87.
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  12.  11
    Alexander Tabarrok & David J. Undis (2006). Response to “Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups” by Timothy F. Murphy and Robert M. Veatch. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (4):450-456.
    In their paper “Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups,” Timothy Murphy and Robert Veatch question the ethical underpinnings of LifeSharers, a grass-roots effort to increase the supply of organs by giving organ donors preferred access to organs.
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  13.  29
    P. Forrest (2009). Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency * By TIMOTHY O'CONNOR. Analysis 69 (3):589-591.
    In this book Timothy O’Connor combines an investigation of modal epistemology with a fresh look at the traditional contingency version of the cosmological argument. The connection between the two parts is that he defends the practice of hypothesizing necessities for explanatory purposes, resisting those accounts that link possibility too closely to conceivability. This provides the context in which he asks the existence question, ‘Why do the particular contingent objects there are exist and undergo the events they do?’ . Wisely (...)
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  14.  12
    N. N. Trakakis (2014). Timothy D. Knepper: The Ends of Philosophy of Religion: Terminus and Telos. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (3):255-258.
    Timothy Knepper’s book is divided into two parts, the first and more critical of which seeks to uncover the limits and weaknesses of analytic and continental philosophy of religion, while the second and more constructive section seeks to develop an alternative and more fruitful way of practising philosophy of religion, “one that is historically grounded and religiously diverse” (p. xiii). Much of the impetus behind the book derives from feelings of dismay and dissatisfaction, familiar especially to religious studies scholars, (...)
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  15.  29
    Samuel Newlands (2010). Theism and Ultimate Explanation – Timothy O'Connor. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):438-442.
    This is a book review of "Theism and Ultimate Explanation", by Timothy O'Connor.
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  16.  25
    Sebastian P. Brock (1999). Two Letters of the Patriarch Timothy From the Late Eighth Century on Translations From Greek. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 9 (2):233.
    Among the extensive correspondence of Timothy I, Catholicos of the Church of the East, are two letters which refer to his collobaration in a translation of Aristotle's Topics into Syriac and Arabic, commissioned by the Caliph al-Mahdī. An annotated English translation of both letters is provided.
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  17.  2
    Abiola I. Mbamalu (2014). 'The Woman Was Deceived and Became a Sinner' - a Literary-Theological Investigation of 1 Timothy 2:11-15. Hts Theological Studies 70 (3):01-07.
    In 1 Timothy 2:11-15 women are forbidden to teach and have authority over men in the church. The ground for this instruction is the creation account in Genesis 2 that asserts the priority of Adam over Eve in the order of creation. The second reason for the instruction is the deception of Eve according to the account of the Fall in Genesis 3. This pericope has elicited arguments between advocates of egalitarianism and complementarianism revolving over the issues of grammar, (...)
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  18.  7
    Alan Padgett (1987). Wealthy Women at Ephesus I Timothy 2:8–15 in Social Context. Interpretation 41 (1):19-31.
    Careful attention to the social situations implied in the passages of First Timothy about women indicates there is nothing there that would limit the role of women in the church.
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  19.  6
    Timothy McDonough (2004). Nicholas C. Burbules, Bryan Warnick, Timothy McDonough, and Scott Johnston. In Armen Marsoobian & John Ryder (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub. 343.
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  20.  2
    Timothy Pritchard (2010). Miracles and Violations: Timothy Pritchard. Religious Studies 47 (1):41-58.
    The claim that a miracle is a violation of a law of nature has sometimes been used as part of an a priori argument against the possibility of miracle, on the grounds that a violation is conceptually impossible. I criticize these accounts but also suggest that alternative accounts, when phrased in terms of laws of nature, fail to provide adequate conceptual space for miracles. It is not clear what a ???violation??? of a law of nature might be, but this is (...)
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  21.  13
    Carson Strong (2002). Response to ???May a Woman Clone Herself???? By Jean E. Chambers (CQ Vol 10, No 2) and ???Entitlement to Cloning??? By Timothy F. Murphy (CQ Vol 8, No 3). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):76-82.
    Jean E. Chambers and Timothy F. Murphy responded to my article “Cloning and Infertility” and extended the debate over human cloning in interesting ways. I had argued that none of the objections to cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer are successful in the context of infertile couples who use cloning to have genetically related children, assuming the issue of safety is overcome by scientific advances.
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  22.  13
    Timothy Williams (1999). Logic and Existence: Timothy Williams. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):181-203.
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  23.  4
    Sabrina Reed (2012). 'Murder by Milligrams': Enhancement Technologies and Therapeutic Zeal in Timothy Findley's Headhunter”. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (3):161-173.
    In his 1993 novel Headhunter, Canadian author Timothy Findley describes the tendency of some medical practitioners to put scientific interests above the therapeutic needs of the individual. As the book's title and name of the main character Dr. Kurtz attest, Findley reflects the colonialist teleology found in Heart of Darkness as an analogue for the therapeutic zeal shown by many of the physicians in Headhunter. In the novel, such zeal is especially problematic when it is combined with so-called enhancement (...)
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  24.  3
    Thomas J. Armbrecht (2014). Performance Degree Zero: Roland Barthes and the Theatre by Timothy Scheie (Review). Substance 43 (2):207-211.
    Timothy Scheie’s book on the importance of the theatre in Roland Barthes’ oeuvre begins with what Scheie poses as an enigma: Barthes wrote frequently of the theatre at the beginning of his career and then ceased to do so, without comment, after 1960. Scheie argues that Barthes’ abandonment of the theatre reveals something important about the development of his thoughts and even about his life. Scheie also considers Barthes’ early theatrical criticism and later use of theatrical metaphors to be (...)
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  25.  10
    Val Plumwood (1997). Prospecting for Ecological Gold Amongst the Platonic Forms: A Response to Timothy Mahoney. Ethics and the Environment 2 (2):149 - 168.
    Timothy Mahoney discovers and champions an ecologically benign account of Plato in opposition to my own critical analysis of the reason-centeredness, reason-nature dualism, and nature and body devaluation in the Platonic dialogues, in which multiple linked dualisms of reason and nature associated with systems of oppression provide major organizing principles for Platonic philosophy. I show first that Mahoney's criticisms of my interpretation involve some careless and mistaken readings of my own text. Second, I argue that Mahoney* s account of (...)
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  26.  1
    Timothy Connolly (2014). Ethics in Early China: An Anthology. Edited by Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O'Leary. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):210-213.
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  27.  7
    Grace Clement (2003). What Are the Facts of the Matter? A Response to Timothy Costelloe on The Lives of Animals. Philosophical Papers 32 (2):133-139.
    (2003). What are the facts of the matter? A Response to Timothy Costelloe on The Lives of Animals. Philosophical Papers: Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 133-139. doi: 10.1080/05568640309485117.
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  28.  5
    Timothy W. Gleason (1992). Book Review: Unreliable Sources: Review by Timothy W. Gleason. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (1):54 – 59.
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  29. Elvio Baccarini (2007). Timothy Chappell (Ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:389-394.
    Review on Timothy Chappell , Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2006.
     
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  30. Timothy W. Bartel (1988). The Plight of the Relative Trinitarian: TIMOTHY W. BARTEL. Religious Studies 24 (2):129-155.
    According to the Law of Non–Contradiction, no statement and its negation are jointly true. According to many critics, Christians cannot serve both the orthodox faith and the Law of Non–Contradiction: if they hold to the one they must despise the other. And according to an impressive number of these critics, Christians who cling to the traditional doctrine of the Trinity must despise the Law of Non–Contradiction. Augustine's statement of this doctrine poses the problem as poignantly as any.
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  31. Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.) (2009). The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
    Timothy Smiley has made ground-breaking contributions to modal logic, free logic, multiple-conclusion logic, and plural logic. He has illuminated Aristotle’s syllogistic, the ideas of logical form and consequence, and the distinction between assertion and rejection, and has worked to debunk the theory of descriptions. This volume brings together new articles by an international roster of leading logicians and philosophers in order to honour Smiley’s work. Their essays will be of significant interest to those working across the logical spectrum—in philosophy (...)
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  32. Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.) (2015). The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
    Timothy Smiley has made ground-breaking contributions to modal logic, free logic, multiple-conclusion logic, and plural logic. He has illuminated Aristotle’s syllogistic, the ideas of logical form and consequence, and the distinction between assertion and rejection, and has worked to debunk the theory of descriptions. This volume brings together new articles by an international roster of leading logicians and philosophers in order to honour Smiley’s work. Their essays will be of significant interest to those working across the logical spectrum—in philosophy (...)
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  33. Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.) (2010). The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge.
    Timothy Smiley has made ground-breaking contributions to modal logic, free logic, multiple-conclusion logic, and plural logic; he has illuminated Aristotle’s syllogistic, the ideas of logical form and consequence, and the distinction between assertion and rejection; and his debunking work on the theory of descriptions is a tour de force. In this volume, an international roster of contributors discuss Smiley's work to date; their essays will be of significant interest to those working across the logical spectrum—in philosophy of language, philosophical (...)
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  34. Timothy Madigan (2010). The Confessions of Second Timothy. Free Inquiry 30:32-33.
     
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  35. Timothy O'Connor (2000). Review of Timothy Cleveland, Trying Without Willing. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61:242-244.
  36. Timothy O'hagan (1982). Althusser: How to Be a Marxist in Philosophy: Timothy O'Hagan. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 14:243-264.
    Althusser called a recent essay: ‘Is it simple to be a Marxist in philosophy?’ My title, intentionally provocative, echoes that question. Following Althusser, I shall answer it in the negative and, in so doing, shall raise a series of further questions concerning the nature of and connections between politics, science and philosophy. My lecture will keep turning on these three points, just as Althusser's own work has turned on them, ever since his first book, a monograph on Montesquieu, up to (...)
     
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  37. Cristina Richie (2016). Lessons From Queer Bioethics: A Response to Timothy F. Murphy. Bioethics 30 (4).
    ‘Bioethics still has important work to do in helping to secure status equality for LGBT people’ writes Timothy F. Murphy in a recent Bioethics editorial. The focus of his piece, however, is much narrower than human rights, medical care for LGBT people, or ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Rather, he is primarily concerned with sexuality and gender identity, and the medical intersections thereof. It is the objective of this response to provide an alternate account of bioethics from a Queer perspective. (...)
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  38. Michael Silk (2013). The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present Ed. By Timothy M. Costelloe (Review). American Journal of Philology 134 (3):517-521.
  39.  14
    Louis deRosset (2016). Modal Logic and Contingentism: A Comment on Timothy Williamson’s Modal Logic as Metaphysics. Analysis 76 (2):155-172.
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  40.  14
    Jeffrey C. King (2016). Timothy Williamson on the Contingently Concrete and Non-Concrete. Analysis 76 (2):190-201.
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  41. B. Q. Cambridge (2000). Book Reviews : Religion in English Everyday Life: An Ethnographic Approach, by Timothy Jenkins. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 1999. 256 Pp. Pb. 14.50. ISBN 1-57181-769-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 13 (2):106-111.
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  42. Deborah Krause (forthcoming). Book Review: I & II Timothy and Titus: A Commentary. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):74-76.
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  43. Jouette M. Bassler (forthcoming). Book Review: The Pastoral Epistles: First Timothy, Second Timothy, and Titus. [REVIEW] Interpretation 63 (1):78-80.
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  44. Judson Murray (2013). Ethics in Early China: An Anthology Ed. By Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O'Leary (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (3):442-446.
    Ethics in Early China: An Anthology is a major contribution to the philosophical study of early Chinese ethics and comparative ethics by a collection of some of the most distinguished scholars in these fields. This anthology honors Professor Chad Hansen's many and important contributions to the study of Chinese philosophy, but the work is not a festschrift per se. Instead of discussing the honoree's oeuvre in a collection of essays, these new, innovative, and outstanding writings engage, bear upon, develop, and (...)
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  45. L. Susan Bond (forthcoming). 1 Timothy 1:3–17. Interpretation 60 (3):314-317.
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  46. Barry Smart (1994). Reviews : Michel Foucault Philosopher, French and German Trans. Timothy J. Armstrong (Harvester Wheatsheaf, London 1992). Thesis Eleven 38 (1):193-197.
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  47.  78
    Ernest Sosa (2009). Timothy Williamson's Knowledge and its Limits. In Patrick Greenough & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Williamson on Knowledge. OUP Oxford 203--16.
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  48.  94
    Alyce M. McKenzie (forthcoming). 2 Timothy 1:3–7. Interpretation 60 (3):318-320.
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  49.  96
    Laurence J. O'Connell, James Parker, Mary C. Rawlinson, Massimo Reichlin, David Resnik, John Sadler, Yosaf Hulgus, George Agich, Marian Gray Secundy & Mark J. Sedler (1994). AIDS 519 Murphy, Timothy F. Health-Care Workers with AIDS and a Patient's Right to Know 553 Nelson, James Lindemann. Publicity and Pricelessness: Grassroots Decisionmaking and Justice in Rationing 333. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19:641-645.
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  50.  89
    N. Townsend (1995). Book Reviews : Religion, Politics and the Moral Life, by Michael Oakeshott, Edited by Timothy Fuller. New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 1993. Viii + 166pp. Pb. 18.95. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 8 (1):135-138.
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