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Timothy Chappell [70]Timothy Dj Chappell [1]
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Profile: Timothy Chappell (Open University (UK))
  1. Timothy Chappell (forthcoming). The Future-Person Standpoint. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  2. Timothy Chappell, Augustine's Ethics.
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  3. Timothy Chappell, Critical Notice. Paul Horwich, Wittgenstein's Metaphilosophy.
    In the Preface to his fine book, Paul Horwich deplores the “polar split” that he sees in academic philosophy today between most philosophers, who don’t care about Wittgenstein, and the Wittgensteinian minority, who don’t care about much else, and are “engaged in feuds with one other that no one else cares about” (p.xiii). Whether or not this picture is entirely fair either to Wittgensteinians or to non-Wittgensteinians, it is certainly true, and unfortunate, that Wittgenstein has been normalised by the academic (...)
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  4. Timothy Chappell (2014). Knowing What to Do: Imagination, Virtue, and Platonism in Ethics. Oup Oxford.
    Timothy Chappell develops a picture of what philosophical ethics can be like, once set aside from conventional moral theory. His question is 'How are we to know what to do?', and the answer he defends is 'By developing our moral imaginations'--a key part of human excellence, which plays many roles in our practical and evaluative lives.
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  5. Timothy Chappell (2014). Paul Horwich, Wittgenstein's Metaphilosophy (Oxford University Press, 2012). 225 Pp., Price £46.00. [REVIEW] Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):258-271.
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  6. Timothy Chappell (2014). Virtues and Rules. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
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  7. Timothy Chappell, Why Ethics is Hard.
    I argue that one central resource for ethical thinking, seriously under-explored in contemporary anglophone philosophy, is moral phenomenology, the exploration of the texture and quality (the “what-it’s-like-ness”) of moral experience. Perhaps a barrier that has prevented people from using this resource is that it’s hard to talk about experience. But such knowledge can be communicated, e.g. by poetry and drama. In having such experiences, either in real life or at second-hand through art, we can gain moral knowledge, rather as Mary (...)
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  8. Timothy Chappell (2013). Glory in Sport (and Elsewhere). Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:99-128.
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  9. Timothy Chappell (2013). Kalou Heneka. In Julia Peters (ed.), Aristotelian Ethics in Contemporary Perspective. Routledge. 158.
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  10. Timothy Chappell, Virtue Ethics and Rules.
    Examines the place of rules in virtue ethics, and concludes by reviewing examples that the idea that virtue ethics can have no place for rules is groundless.
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  11. Timothy Chappell (2013). What Have I Done? Diametros 38:86-111.
    An externalist view of intention is developed on broadly Wittgensteinian grounds, and applied to show that the classic Thomist doctrine of double effect, though it has good uses in casuistry, has also been overused because of the internalism about intention that has generally been presupposed by its users. We need a good criterion of what counts as the content of our intentional actions; I argue, again on Wittgensteinian grounds, that the best criterion comes not from foresight, nor from foresight plus (...)
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  12. Timothy Chappell (2012). But It is Easy to Assemble a List of Criticisms; It is Much Harder to Write a Really Good Book. In This Latter, Harder Task, John Kekes has, Once More, Succeeded Admirably. Mind 121:483.
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  13. Timothy Chappell (2012). Climbing Which Mountain? A Critical Study of Derek Parfit On What Matters (OUP 2011). Philosophical Investigations 35 (2):167-181.
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  14. Timothy Chappell (2012). Festschrift Long (A.) Nightingale, (D.) Sedley (Edd.) Ancient Models of Mind. Studies in Human and Divine Rationality. Pp. X + 250. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Cased, £55, US$95. ISBN: 978-0-521-11355-7. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (1):66-69.
  15. Timothy Chappell (2012). Reflections on How We Live, by Annette Baier. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, Ix + 275 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-957036-2 Hb £26.00. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):502-507.
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  16. Timothy Chappell (2012). The Fear of Death. Think 11 (30):57-71.
    Of course there is a long history of such sayings in all the world’s main spiritual traditions. Socrates’ remark reminds us at once of Solon’s doleful doctrine that we should call no man happy until he is dead (Herodotus Histories Book 1; Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics 1100a11). And Bonhoeffer’s famous saying, while it echoes the typical teaching of many Christian spiritual masters, for instance St Thomas à Kempis and Bianco da Siena (the author of that beautiful hymn “Come down O Love (...)
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  17. Timothy Chappell (2012). Varieties of Knowledge in Plato and Aristotle. Topoi 31 (2):175-190.
    I develop the relatively familiar idea of a variety of forms of knowledge—not just propositional knowledge but also knowledge-how and experiential knowledge—and show how this variety can be used to make interesting sense of Plato’s and Aristotle’s philosophy, and in particular their ethics. I then add to this threefold analysis of knowledge a less familiar fourth variety, objectual knowledge, and suggest that this is also interesting and important in the understanding of Plato and Aristotle.
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  18. Timothy Chappell (2011). Glory as an Ethical Idea. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):105-134.
    There is a gap between what we think and what we think we think about ethics. This gap appears when elements of our ethical reflection and our moral theories contradict each other. It also appears when something that is important in our ethical reflection is sidelined in our moral theories. The gap appears in both ways with the ethical idea glory. The present exploration of this idea is a case study of how far actual ethical reflection diverges from moral theory. (...)
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  19. Timothy Chappell (2011). How to deliberate well about acting badly: Why moral imagination is a better resource than moral theory. Think 10 (29):71-82.
    Tim the terrorist: We have Tim the terrorist in custody, and we know that he knows where the bomb is that his group have secretly planted somewhere in central London, and we know that if we torture him hard enough he will reliably tell us where it is in time for us to defuse it, and we know that there is no other way of getting him to tell us, and we know that if we don't defuse it the bomb (...)
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  20. Timothy Chappell (2011). On the Very Idea of Criteria for Personhood. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (1):1-27.
    I examine the familiar criterial view of personhood, according to which the possession of personal properties such as self-consciousness, emotionality, sentience, and so forth is necessary and sufficient for the status of a person. I argue that this view confuses criteria for personhood with parts of an ideal of personhood. In normal cases, we have already identified a creature as a person before we start looking for it to manifest the personal properties, indeed this pre-identification is part of what makes (...)
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  21. Timothy Chappell (2011). Theism in Historical Perspective. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):123 - 138.
    I will discuss some familiar problems in the philosophy of religion which arise for theistic belief. I will argue that it may be most worthwhile to focus on a particular sort of theistic belief, capital-T ’Theism’, central to which is a particular conception both of God and of the believer’s relation to God. At the heart of ’Theism’ in this sense is the continuing experience of God, both individual and collective. Compared with the evidence for Theistic belief that is provided (...)
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  22. Timothy Chappell (2010). “A Logos That Increases Itself”: Response to Burley. Philosophy 85 (1):105-108.
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  23. Timothy Chappell (2010). Book Review. Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity. By Christine M. Korsgaard. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (3):425-432.
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  24. Timothy Chappell (2010). Ethical Blind-Spots: Why Socrates Was Not a Cosmopolitan. Ratio 23 (1):17-33.
    Though Socrates can easily look like a cosmopolitan in moral and political theory, a closer reading of the relevant texts shows that, in the most important sense of the term as we now use it, he turns out – disappointingly, perhaps – not to be. The reasons why not are instructive and important, both for readers of Plato and for political theorists; they have to do with the phenomenon that I shall call ethical blind-spots.
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  25. Timothy Chappell (2010). Euthyphro's 'Dilemma', Socrates' 'Daimonion'. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (1):39 - 64.
    In this paper I start with the familiar accusation that divine command ethics faces a "Euthyphro dilemma". By looking at what Plato’s ’Euthyphro’ actually says, I argue that no such argument against divine-command ethics was Plato’s intention, and that, in any case, no such argument is cogent. I then explore the place of divine commands and inspiration in Plato’s thought more generally, arguing that Plato sees an important epistemic and practical role for both.
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  26. Timothy Chappell (2010). Mi-Kyoung Lee's Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus. Philosophical Books 51 (2):117-125.
  27. Timothy Chappell (2010). Reviews Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity . By Christine M. Korsgaard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, Pp. XIV+230, £45.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (3):424-432.
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  28. Timothy Chappell, Ethics and Experience: Life Beyond Moral Theory.
    Ethics and Experience presents a wide-ranging and thought-provoking introduction to the question famously posed by Socrates: “How is life to be lived?” An excellent primer for any student taking a course on moral philosophy, the book introduces ethics as a single and broadly unified field of inquiry in which we apply reason to try and solve Socrates’ question. Ethics and Experience examines the major forms of ethical subjectivism and objectivism - including expressivism, “error theory”, naturalism, and intuitionism. The book lays (...)
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  29. Timothy Chappell (2009). Ethics Beyond Moral Theory. Philosophical Investigations 32 (3):206-243.
    I develop an anti-theory view of ethics. Moral theory (Kantian, utilitarian, virtue ethical, etc.) is the dominant approach to ethics among academic philosophers. But moral theory's hunt for a single Master Factor (utility, universalisability, virtue . . .) is implausibly systematising and reductionist. Perhaps scientism drives the approach? But good science always insists on respect for the data, even messy data: I criticise Singer's remarks on infanticide as a clear instance of moral theory failing to respect the data of moral (...)
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  30. Timothy Chappell (2009). Infinity Goes Up on Trial: Must Immortality Be Meaningless? European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):30-44.
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  31. Timothy Chappell (2009). Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline – by Bernard Williamsthe Sense of the Past – by Bernard Williams. Philosophical Investigations 32 (4):360-371.
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  32. Timothy Chappell, Bernard Williams. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  33. Timothy Chappell (2008). Critical Study. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):65-75.
  34. Timothy Chappell (2008). Defending the Unity of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):532–538.
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  35. Timothy Chappell (2008). Moral Perception. Philosophy 83 (4):421-437.
    I develop an account of moral perception which is able to deal well with familiar naturalistic non-realist complaints about ontological extravagance and ‘queerness’. I show how this account can also ground a cogent response to familiar objections presented by Simon Blackburn (about supervenience) and J.L. Mackie (about motivation). The familiar realist's problem about relativism, however, remains.
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  36. Timothy Chappell, Plato on Knowledge in the Theaetetus. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  37. Timothy Chappell (2008). Review: Defending the Unity of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):532 - 538.
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  38. Timothy Chappell (2008). Utopias and the Art of the Possible. Analyse and Kritik 30 (1).
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  39. Timothy Chappell (2007). Integrity and Demandingness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (3):255 - 265.
    I discuss Bernard Williams’ ‘integrity objection’ – his version of the demandingness objection to unreasonably demanding ‘extremist’ moral theories such as consequentialism – and argue that it is best understood as presupposing the internal reasons thesis. However, since the internal reasons thesis is questionable, so is Williams’ integrity objection. I propose an alternative way of bringing out the unreasonableness of extremism, based on the notion of the agent’s autonomy, and show how an objection to this proposal can be outflanked by (...)
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  40. Timothy Chappell (2007). Jonathan Kvanvig: The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding. Faith and Philosophy 24 (4):475-479.
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  41. Timothy Chappell (2007). Review of Graham Oddie, Value, Reality and Desire. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).
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  42. Timothy Chappell, Understanding Human Goods.
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  43. Timothy Chappell (2006). The Variety of Life and the Unity of Practical Wisdom. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  44. Timothy Chappell (2005). Review of Jonathan Dancy, Ethics Without Principles. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (7).
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  45. Timothy Chappell (2005). 'The Good Man is the Measure of All Things': Objectivity Without World-Centredness in Aristotle's Moral Epistemology. In Christopher Gill (ed.), Virtue, Norms, and Objectivity: Issues in Ancient and Modern Ethics. Clarendon Press.
  46. Timothy Chappell (2004). Augustine and the Limits of Politics. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (4):114-115.
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  47. Timothy Chappell, The Polymorphy of Practical Reason.
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  48. Timothy Chappell & David S. Oderberg, Introduction.
    [About the book] Natural law theory says that humans can only live well if they recognise the goods that are natural for humans, and understand how those goods generate the system of practical guidance that we call morality. Natural law is a long-established and flourishing ethical tradition, with roots in Aristotle and Aquinas, which is increasingly recognised as a worthy competitor to Kantianism, utilitarianism and virtue ethics. The new essays in this collection represent the latest thinking - both constructive and (...)
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  49. Timothy Chappell (2003). Practical Rationality for Pluralists About the Good. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (2):161-177.
    I argue that if a normative theory of practical rationality is to represent an adequate and coherent response to a plurality of incommensurable goods, it cannot be a maximising theory. It will have to be a theory that recognises two responses to goods as morally licit – promotion and respect – and one as morally illicit – violation. This result has a number of interesting corollaries, some of which I indicate. Perhaps the most interesting is that it makes the existence (...)
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  50. Timothy Chappell (2002). Being Good. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):262-265.
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