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Timothy D. Roche [7]Timothy Dean Roche [3]
  1.  22
    Timothy Dean Roche (1988). Ergon and Eudaimonia in Nicomachean Ethics I: Reconsidering the Intellectualist Interpretation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):175-194.
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  2.  56
    Timothy D. Roche (1988). On the Alleged Metaphysical Foundation of Aristotle's Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):49-62.
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  3.  1
    Timothy D. Roche & Richard Kraut (1992). Aristotle on the Human Good. Philosophical Review 101 (3):629.
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  4.  26
    Timothy D. Roche (1989). The Perfect Happiness. Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (S1):103-125.
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  5.  15
    Timothy D. Roche (1982). Utilitarianism Versus Rawls. Social Theory and Practice 8 (2):189-212.
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  6.  2
    Timothy D. Roche (1989). Editor's Introduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (S1):i-i.
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  7.  16
    Timothy D. Roche (1992). In Defense of an Alternative View of the Foundation of Aristotle's Moral Theory. Phronesis 37 (1):46 - 84.
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  8.  4
    Timothy D. Roche (1994). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 103 (410):202-208.
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  9. Timothy Dean Roche (1984). Aristotle on the Good for Man. Dissertation, University of California, Davis
    It is commonly believed that Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics argues for a "dominant end" intellectualist theory of the human good. This theory specifies contemplative activity as the sole element in the best life for man, and it implies that all other goods, including moral and political activities, have value only as means to contemplative activity. It is conceded that Aristotle sometimes appears to regard the highest good as an "inclusive end," an end composed of several independently valued things, but this is (...)
     
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  10. Timothy Dean Roche (1989). Spindel Conference 1988 Aristotle's Ethics. Dept. Of Philosophy, Memphis State University.
     
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