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  1.  88 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2003). The Reason of the Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 48 (1):83-106.
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  2.  56 DLs
    Timothy A. O. Endicott (1998). Herbert Hart and the Semantic Sting. Legal Theory 4 (3):283-300.
    Even to disagree, we need to understand each other. If I reject what you say without understanding you, we will only have the illusion of a disagreement. You will be asserting one thing and I will be denying another. Even to disagree, we need some agreement.
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  3.  43 DLs
    Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott (2000). Vagueness in Law. Oxford University Press.
    Vagueness in law can lead to indeterminacies in legal rights and obligations. This book responds to the challenges that those indeterminacies pose to theories of law and adjudication.
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  4.  34 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2011). Morality and the Making of Law: Four Questions. Jurisprudence 1 (2):267-275.
    I address four questions that arise out of Nigel Simmonds's book, Law as a Moral Idea : Is politics a moral idea too? Is there any such thing as law making? Is there a right answer to every legal dispute? What justifies a judicial decision? To each question I propose an answer that shares much with Simmonds's views, but diverges. Simmonds is right to call law a 'moral idea', and that implies a connection between law and a moral ideal; in (...)
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  5.  24 DLs
    Timothy A. O. Endicott (1994). Putting Interpretation in its Place. Law and Philosophy 13 (4):451 - 479.
    What can a philosophical analysis of the concept of interpretation contribute to legal theory? In his recent book,Interpretation and Legal Theory, Andrei Marmor proposes a complex and ambitious analysis as groundwork for his positivist assault on “interpretive” theories of law and of language. I argue (i) that the crucial element in Marmor's analysis of interpretation is his treatment of Ludwig Wittgenstein's remarks on following rules, and (ii) that a less ambitious analysis of interpretation than Marmor's can take better advantage of (...)
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  6.  20 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2001). Are There Any Rules? Journal of Ethics 5 (3):199-219.
    Widespread, deep controversy as to the content of the law of a community is compatible with the view that the law is a system of rules. I defend that view through a critique of Ronald Dworkin's discussion of Riggs v. Palmer 22 N.E. 188 (1889). Dworkin raised an important challenge for jurisprudence: to account for the fact that legal rights and duties are frequently controversial. I offer an explanation of the possibility of deep disagreement about the application of social (...)
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  7.  12 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (1997). Vagueness and Legal Theory. Legal Theory 3 (1):37.
    The use of vague language in law has important implications for legal theory. Legal philosophers have occasionally grappled with those implications, but they have not come to grips with the characteristic phenomenon of vagueness: the Sorites paradox. I discuss the paradox, and claim that it poses problems for some legal theorists (David Lyons, Hans Kelsen, and especially, Ronald Dworkin). I propose that a good account of vagueness will have three consequences for legal theory. (edited).
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  8.  11 DLs
    Timothy Endicott, Law and Language. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  9.  3 DLs
    Timothy A. O. Endicott (1999). The Impossibility of the Rule of Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (1):1-18.
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  10.  2 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2013). The Irony of Law. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press 327.
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  11.  1 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2011). Vagueness and Law. In Giuseppina Ronzitti (ed.), Vagueness: A Guide. Springer Verlag 171--191.
  12.  1 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2007). Adjudication and the Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (2):311-326.
    It can be compatible with justice and the rule of law for a court to impose new legal liabilities retrospectively on a defendant. But judges do not need to distinguish between imposing a new liability, and giving effect to a liability that the defendant had at the time of the events in dispute. The distinction is to be drawn by asking which of the court's reasons for decision the institutions of the legal system had already committed the courts to act (...)
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  13.  1 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2010). The Logic of Freedom and Power. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. OUP Oxford
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  14.  0 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2006). The Infant in the Snow. In J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.), Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press
     
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  15.  0 DLs
    Timothy Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. OUP Oxford.
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  16.  0 DLs
    Timothy Endicott & Herbert Hart (1998). The Semantic Sting. Legal Theory 4.
     
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  17.  0 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2003). Raz on Gaps. In Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas W. Pogge (eds.), Rights, Culture and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. OUP Oxford
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  18.  0 DLs
    Timothy Endicott (2001). Preface. Legal Theory 7 (4):369-369.
    Preface to a Symposium on Vagueness and Law at Columbia University Law School on September 24 and 25, 1999. The purpose of the seminar was to provide an opportunity for philosophers of law, philosophers of language, and philosophers of logic to discuss problems about vagueness that are currently under debate in all three areas.
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  19.  0 DLs
    J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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