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Timothy Krahn [8]Timothy Mark Krahn [1]
  1. Timothy Mark Krahn (forthcoming). Care Ethics for Guiding the Process of Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100063.
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder for which there is no definitive diagnostic test. Uncertainty characterises most of its features with diagnosis reached through a process of elimination. Coping with uncertainty has been recognised as a significant problem for MS patients. Discussions in the literature concerning the ethics of MS diagnosis have focused on an ethics of duty emphasising the rules for disclosure and healthcare professionals’ obligations to provide information to patients. This narrow construal of the ethics at (...)
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  2. Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2012). The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism and the Potential Adverse Effects for Boys and Girls with Autism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):93-103.
    Autism, typically described as a spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in verbal ability and social reciprocity as well as obsessive or repetitious behaviours, is currently thought to markedly affect more males than females. Not surprisingly, this encourages a gendered understanding of the Autism Spectrum. Simon Baron-Cohen, a prominent authority in the field of autism research, characterizes the male brain type as biased toward systemizing. In contrast, the female brain type is understood to be biased toward empathizing. Since persons with (...)
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  3. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2011). Review of Disability Bioethics: Moral Bodies, Moral Difference by Jackie Leach Scully. [REVIEW] Hypatia 26 (3):651-655.
  4. Frederic Gilbert, Lawrence Burns & Timothy Krahn (2011). The Inheritance, Power and Predicaments of the “Brain-Reading” Metaphor. Medicine Studies 2 (4):229-244.
    Purpose With the increasing sophistication of neuroimaging technologies in medicine, new language is being sought to make sense of the findings. The aim of this paper is to explore whether the brain-reading metaphor used to convey current medical or neurobiological findings imports unintended significations that do not necessarily reflect the genuine findings made by physicians and neuroscientists. Methods First, the paper surveys the ambiguities of the readability metaphor, drawing from the history of science and medicine, paying special attention to the (...)
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  5. Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such technologies (...)
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  6. Timothy Krahn (2009). Book and Media Reviews. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4 (1):4-6.
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  7. Timothy Krahn (2009). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Does Age of Onset Matter (Anymore)? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (2):187-202.
    The identification and avoidance of disease susceptibility in embryos is the most common goal of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Most jurisdictions that accept but regulate the availability of PGD restrict it to what are characterized as ‘serious’ conditions. Line-drawing around seriousness is not determined solely by the identification of a genetic mutation. Other factors seen to be relevant include: impact on health or severity of symptoms; degree of penetrance (probability of genotype being expressed as a genetic disorder); potential for therapy; (...)
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  8. Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2009). Autism, Empathy and Questions of Moral Agency. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (2):145-166.
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  9. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2008). Who's to Regret, What's to Regret? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):42 – 43.
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