38 found
Sort by:
  1. Celeste-Marie Bernier, Radu J. Bogdan, James T. Boulton, T. O. McLoughlin, James Boswell, James Berry, Caroline Lennox, Timothy M. Costelloe & Marica Costigliolo (forthcoming). Arena, Valentina. Libertas and the Practice of Politics in the Late Roman Republic. New York: Cambridge UP, 2013. Ix, 324p., Bibl., Ill., Index, $99. Competing Languages of ''Liberty''and Political Legitimacy in the First Century BC Ball, Philip. Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything. Chicago. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Ideas.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Timothy M. Costelloe (2014). Brady, Emily. The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature. Cambridge University Press, 2013, Xii + 227 Pp., 4 B&W Illus., $90.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):209-212.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Timothy M. Costelloe (2013). The British Aesthetic Tradition: From Shaftesbury to Wttgenstein. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: a brief history of 'aesthetics'; Part I. The Age of Taste: 1. Internal sense theorists; 2. Imagination theorists; 3. Associationist theorists; Part II. The Age of Romanticism: 4. The picturesque; 5. Wordsworth and the early Romantics; 6. Victorian criticism; Part III. The Age of Analysis: 7. Theories of expression; 8. Wittgenstein and afterwards.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Timothy M. Costelloe (2013). The Faculty of Taste. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. 430.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Timothy M. Costelloe (2012). A Short Introduction to a Long History. In , The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press. 1.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Timothy M. Costelloe (2012). Hume on History. In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. 364.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Timothy M. Costelloe (2012). Imagination and Internal Sense The Sublime in Shaftesbury, Reid, Addison, and Reynolds. In , The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press. 50.
  8. Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.) (2012). The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 'The sublime'. A short introduction to a long history Timothy M. Costelloe; Part I. Philosophical History of the Sublime: 1. Longinus and the ancient sublime Malcolm Heath; 2...And the beautiful? revisiting Edmund Burke's 'double aesthetics' Rodolphe Gasche; 3. The moral source of the Kantian sublime Melissa Meritt; 4. Imagination and internal sense: the sublime in Shaftesbury, Reid, Addison, and Reynolds Timothy M. Costelloe; 5. The associative sublime: Kames, Gerrard, Alison, and Stewart Rachel Zuckert; 6. The 'prehistory' (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Timothy M. Costelloe & Andrew Chignell (2011). A Dialogue Concerning Aesthetics and Apolaustics. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):v-xvi.
    A debate between two aestheticians concerning the relative influence of Scottish and German philosophers on the contemporary discipline. -/- .
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Timothy M. Costelloe (2010). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume by Dadlez, E. M. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):179-181.
  11. Timothy M. Costelloe (2009). David Hume. Hume Studies 30 (2):405-407.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Timothy M. Costelloe (2008). Zoographies. Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):159-162.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Timothy M. Costelloe (2007). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume. Routledge.
    General rules and "of the standard of taste" -- Aesthetic beauty and moral beauty -- Antinomy and error -- Reflection and character -- Beauty and moral life -- Progress and prejudice -- Philosophy and moral life.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Timothy M. Costelloe (2007). Hume's Phenomenology of the Imagination. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):31-45.
    This paper examines the role of the imagination in Hume's epistemology.<span class='Hi'></span> Three specifi c powers of the imagination are identifi ed <span class='Hi'></span>– the imagistic,<span class='Hi'></span> conceptual,<span class='Hi'></span> and productive <span class='Hi'></span>– as well as three corresponding kinds of fi ctions based on the degree of belief contained in each class of ideas the imagination creates.<span class='Hi'></span> These are generic fi ctions,<span class='Hi'></span> real and mere fi ctions,<span class='Hi'></span> and necessary fi ctions,<span class='Hi'></span> respectively.<span class='Hi'></span> Through these manifestations,<span class='Hi'></span> (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Timothy M. Costelloe (2007). So Forward to Imagine. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:117-122.
    This paper argues that an important feature of Locke's doctrine concerning primary and secondary qualities is also central to Hume's thinking. Section one considers Locke's distinction, presenting it in terms of an "error theory." Locke argues that we attribute secondary qualities to objects and that in so doing give those qualities an ontological status they do not otherwise possess. Locke completes his theory by drawing on the concept of "resemblance" to explain why such mistakes occur in the first place. Section (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Timothy M. Costelloe (2006). Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):667-668.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Timothy M. Costelloe (2006). Review: Deligiorgi, Kant and the Culture of Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):667-668.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). Beauty, Morals, and Hume's Conception of Character. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (4):397 - 415.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). Claudia M. Schmidt. David Hume: Reason in History. Hume Studies 30 (2):405.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). David Hume: Reason in History. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 30 (2):405-407.
  21. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). Hume's Aesthetics. Hume Studies 30 (1):87-126.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). Hume's Aesthetics: The Literature and Directions for Research. Hume Studies 30 (1):87-126.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). `In Every Civilized Community': Hume on Belief and the Demise of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 55 (3):171-185.
    This paper considers the claim that Hume washostile to religion and religious belief, andhoped for their demise. Part one examines hisapproach to belief, showing how commentatorstake him to see religious belief asnon-natural. Part two challenges thisconclusion by arguing, first, that Hume'sdistinction between natural and artificialvirtue allows the term ``natural'' to coverreligious belief as well; second, that Humehimself never denies religious belief isnatural, and, third, that he takes religion tobe a necessary part of any flourishing society. The target of Hume's critical (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). Review of Peter Kivy, The Seventh Sense: Francis Hutcheson and Eighteenth-Century Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (4).
  25. Timothy M. Costelloe (2003). Hume, Kant, and the "Antinomy of Taste". Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2):165-185.
  26. Timothy M. Costelloe (2003). The Invisibility of Evil: Moral Progress and the 'Animal Holocaust'. Philosophical Papers 32 (2):109-131.
    This paper explores the concept of an ?animal holocaust? by way of J.M. Coetzee's The Lives of Animals, and asks whether the Nazi treatment of the Jews can be legitimately compared to modern factory farming. While certain parallels make the comparison appealing, it is argued, only the holocaust can be described as ?evil.? The phenomena share another feature, however, namely, the capacity of perpetrators to render victims ?invisible.? This leaves the moral dimension of the comparison in tact since it shows (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Timothy M. Costelloe (2002). Hume's Aesthetic Theory. Hume Studies 28 (1):168-171.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Timothy M. Costelloe (2002). Hume's Aesthetic Theory: Taste and Sentiment (Review). Hume Studies 28 (1):168-171.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Timothy M. Costelloe (2002). Review: Hume's Enlightenment Tract: The Unity and Purpose of an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):84-88.
  30. Timothy M. Costelloe (2001). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):445-446.
  31. Patrick Baert, Brian Baigrie, Stanley Barrett, Pascal Boyer, Michael Chiarello, R. H. Coase, Lorraine Code, Wes Cooper, Timothy M. Costelloe & Robert D’Amico (2000). Refereeing in 1997. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):480.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Timothy M. Costelloe (2000). Science, Consciousness and the “We” in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (2):15-27.
  33. Timothy M. Costelloe (2000). Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (3):441-442.
  34. Timothy M. Costelloe (1999). The Concept of a "State of Nature" in Vico's "New Science". History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (3):321 - 339.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Timothy M. Costelloe (1998). Oakeshott, Wittgenstein, and the Practice of Social Science. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 28 (4):323–347.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Timothy M. Costelloe (1997). Contract or Coincidence: George Herbert Mead and Adam Smith on Self and Society. History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):81-109.
  37. Timothy M. Costelloe (1996). Between the Subject and Sociology: Alfred Schutz's Phenomenology of the Life-World. Human Studies 19 (3):247 - 266.
    In his writings Alfred Schutz identifies an artificiality in the concept of life-world produced by Edmund Husserl's method of reduction. As an alternative, he proposes to assume intersubjectivity as a given of everyday life. This eradicates Husserl's distinction between life-world and natural attitude. The subsequent phenomenological project appears to center upon sociological descriptions of the structures of the life-world rather than on a search for apodictic truth. Schutz, however, actually retains Husserl's emphasis on the subject. A tension then arises between (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Timothy M. Costelloe (1994). Schutz, Music, and Temporality: A Wittgensteinian Assessment. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (4):439-457.
    In his account of musical interaction and temporality, Schutz's outer-inner distinction appears to capture a component of everyday experience. But engagement with Wittgensteinian philosophy reveals Schutz's false contrast between literal and metaphorical components of language, a series of philosophical confusions stemming from reifications of mental verbs, and the attribution of genuine duration to phenomena that have life as linguistic objects. Consequently, Schutz's intended account of social interaction comes to rest upon a radically private concept of the subject. A sociology of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation