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  1. John Gardner & Timothy Macklem, Human Disability.
    Draft, not yet submitted for publication. Posted 12 February 2008.
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  2. Timothy Macklem (2013). Ideas of Easy Virtue. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. 2--346.
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  3. Timothy Macklem (2006). Entrenching Bills of Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (1):107-129.
    The entrenchment of a bill of rights, and the consequent removal of the matters covered in the bill from the domain of the legislature, is commonly thought to constitute a transfer of power from the legislature to the courts. Yet the simple answer to this thought is that, strictly speaking, no such transfer takes place, for in acquiring power to determine the content of a bill of rights the courts do not acquire the power to legislate that the bill denies (...)
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  4. Timothy Macklem (2006). Independence of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    The fundamental freedoms of speech, conscience, privacy, and religion are now an essential part of the fabric of contemporary society, set down in our most basic laws and regularly invoked in our political and cultural debates. These freedoms play a vital role in securing the spaces and opportunities within which people are able to pursue their own lives in their own ways. Independence of Mind takes this accepted thought a step further, by exploring the ways in which the fundamental freedoms (...)
     
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  5. Timothy Macklem & John Gardner (2006). Value, Interest, and Well-Being. Utilitas 18 (4):362-382.
    In this article we consider and cast doubt on two doctrines given prominence and prestige by the utilitarian tradition in ethics. According to the interest theory of value, value is realized only in the advancement of people's interests. According to the well-being theory of interests, people's interests are advanced only in the augmentation of their well-being. We argue that it is possible to resist these doctrines without abandoning the value-humanist doctrine that the value of anything has to be explained in (...)
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  6. John Gardner & Timothy Macklem (2004). Reasons. In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oup Oxford.
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  7. John Gardner & Timothy Macklem (2002). Reasons, Reasoning, Reasonableness. In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oup Oxford.
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  8. Timothy Macklem (2001). Choice and Value. Legal Theory 7 (1):1-34.
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