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Profile: Timothy F. Murphy (University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago)
Profile: Timothy Murphy (Brock University)
  1.  7
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). In Defense of Irreligious Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):3-10.
    Some commentators have criticized bioethics as failing to engage religion both as a matter of theory and practice. Bioethics should work toward understanding the influence of religion as it represents people's beliefs and practices, but bioethics should nevertheless observe limits in regard to religion as it does its normative work. Irreligious skepticism toward religious views about health, healthcare practices and institutions, and responses to biomedical innovations can yield important benefits to the field. Irreligious skepticism makes it possible to raise questions (...)
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  2. A. Corsani & Timothy S. Murphy (2007). Beyond the Myth of Woman: The Becoming-Transfeminist of (Post-) Marxism. Substance 36 (1):107-138.
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  3.  13
    Timothy F. Murphy (2013). Double-Effect Reasoning and the Conception of Human Embryos. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):529-532.
    Some commentators argue that conception signals the onset of human personhood and that moral responsibilities toward zygotic or embryonic persons begin at this point, not the least of which is to protect them from exposure to death. Critics of the conception threshold of personhood ask how it can be morally consistent to object to the embryo loss that occurs in fertility medicine and research but not object to the significant embryo loss that occurs through conception in vivo. Using that apparent (...)
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  4. Timothy F. Murphy (2013). Genetic Modifications for Personal Enhancement: A Defense. Journal of Medical Ethics (4):2012-101026.
    Bioconservative commentators argue that parents should not take steps to modify the genetics of their children even in the name of enhancement because of the damage they predict for values, identities and relationships. Some commentators have even said that adults should not modify themselves through genetic interventions. One commentator worries that genetic modifications chosen by adults for themselves will undermine moral agency, lead to less valuable experiences and fracture people's sense of self. These worries are not justified, however, since the (...)
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  5. Timothy F. Murphy (2010). The Ethics of Helping Transgender Men and Women Have Children. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (1):46-60.
    A transgender man legally married to a woman has given birth to two children, raising questions about the ethics of assisted reproductive treatments (ARTs) for people with cross-sex identities. Psychiatry treats cross-sex identities as a disorder, but key medical organizations and the law in some jurisdictions have taken steps to protect people with these identities from discrimination in health care, housing, and employment. In fact, many people with cross-sex identities bypass psychiatric treatment altogether in order to pursue lives that are (...)
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  6. Timothy F. Murphy (2004). Case Studies in Biomedical Research Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  7.  10
    Timothy F. Murphy (2010). Sex, Romance, and Research Subjects: An Ethical Exploration. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):30-38.
    Professional standards in medicine and psychology treat concurrent sexual relationships with patients as violations of fiduciary trust, and they sometimes rule out sexual relationships even after a clinical relationship is over. These standards also rule out sex with research subjects who are also patients, but what about nonclinical relationships where there are not always parallels to the standards of clinical medicine? One way to treat sex in nonclinical research relationships is to treat it as sex is treated elsewhere among adults, (...)
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  8.  13
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). Ethics, Sexual Orientation, and Choices About Children. The MIT Press.
    Should parents be able to select the sexual orientation of their children, if that were possible through prenatal interventions? _Ethics, Sexual Orientation, and Choices about Children_ reviews the history of this debate which started in the 1970s and has been invigorated by scientific reports about the origins of sexual orientation. This book describes the debate and offers an evaluation of key issues in parental rights, children's rights, and family welfare.
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  9.  16
    Timothy F. Murphy (2014). In Defense of Prenatal Genetic Interventions. Bioethics 28 (7):335-342.
    Jürgen Habermas has argued against prenatal genetic interventions used to influence traits on the grounds that only biogenetic contingency in the conception of children preserves the conditions that make the presumption of moral equality possible. This argument fails for a number of reasons. The contingency that Habermas points to as the condition of moral equality is an artifact of evolutionary contingency and not inviolable in itself. Moreover, as a precedent for genetic interventions, parents and society already affect children's traits, which (...)
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  10. Timothy F. Murphy (2011). Same-Sex Marriage: Not a Threat to Marriage or Children. Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (3):288-304.
    Some critics of same-sex marriage allege that this kind of union not only betrays the nature of marriage but that it also opens children to various kinds of harm. Same-sex marriage is objectionable, on this view, in its nature and in its effects. A view of marriage as requiring an unassisted capacity to conceive children may be respect as one idea of marriage, but this view need not be understood as marriage itself. It is not clear, in any case, why (...)
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  11.  14
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). Commentary: Crossing Cultural Divides: Transgender People Who Want to Have Children. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (02):284-286.
  12.  79
    Raja Halwani, Gary Jaeger, James S. Stramel, Richard Nunan, William S. Wilkerson & Timothy F. Murphy (2008). What is Gay and Lesbian Philosophy? Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):433-471.
    Abstract: This essay explores recent trends and major issues related to gay and lesbian philosophy in ethics (including issues concerning the morality of homosexuality, the natural function of sex, and outing and coming out); religion (covering past and present debates about the status of homosexuality and how biblical and qur'anic passages have been interpreted by both sides of the debate); the law (especially a discussion of the debates surrounding sodomy laws, same-sex marriage and its impact on transsexuals, and whether the (...)
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  13. Antimo Negri & Timothy S. Murphy (2004). Subversive Spinoza Contemporary Variations. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  14.  3
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). The More Irreligion in Bioethics the Better: Reply to Open Peer Commentaries on “In Defense of Irreligious Bioethics”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):W1-W5.
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  15.  90
    Timothy F. Murphy (1987). Homosexuality and Nature: Happiness and the Law at Stake. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):195-204.
  16.  17
    Timothy F. Murphy & Gladys B. White (2005). Dead Sperm Donors or World Hunger: Are Bioethicists Studying the Right Stuff? Hastings Center Report 35 (2):c3-c3.
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  17.  8
    Timothy F. Murphy (2005). Gay and Lesbian Exceptions to the Heterosexual Rule. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):18.
  18.  11
    Timothy F. Murphy (1985). Medical Ethics in Antiquity. International Philosophical Quarterly 25 (4):434-435.
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  19.  9
    Timothy F. Murphy (1994). Ethics in an Epidemic. University of California Press.
    In this humane and graceful book, philosopher Timothy Murphy offers insight into our attempts--popular and academic, American and non-American, scientific and ...
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  20. Timothy F. Murphy (2014). Are Gay and Lesbian People Fading Into the History of Bioethics? Hastings Center Report 44 (5):s6-s11.
  21.  4
    Timothy F. Murphy (2015). Against Withdrawing Government and Insurance Subsidies for ARTs From Fertile People, with Special Reference to Lesbian and Gay Individuals. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):388-390.
    One way to help ensure the future of human life on the planet is to reduce the total number of people alive, as a hedge against dangers to the environment. One commentator has proposed withdrawing government and insurance subsidies from all fertile people, to help reduce the number of births. Any proposal of this kind does not, however, offer a solution commensurate with current problems of resource use and carbon emissions. Closing off fertility medicine to some people – or even (...)
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  22.  7
    Timothy F. Murphy (1985). The Embers and the Stars. International Philosophical Quarterly 25 (4):435-437.
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  23.  5
    Timothy Murphy, Roy Sellars & Robert Smith (1998). Editorial Introduction. Angelaki 3 (2):1-3.
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  24.  13
    Timothy Murphy (2011). When Choosing the Traits of Children is Hurtful to Others. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):105-108.
    Some commentators object to the use of embryonic and fetal diagnostic technologies by parents who wish to avoid disabilities in their children. In particular, they say this use is hurtful in the meaning it expresses, namely that the lives of people with disabilities are not valuable or are less valuable than the lives of others. Other commentators have tried to show that this meaning does not necessarily belong to parents' choices and is not therefore credible as a general moral objection. (...)
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  25.  1
    Timothy F. Murphy (2005). Ethical Justifications for Moratoriums on Vanguard Scientific Research. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):51 – 52.
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  26.  5
    Timothy Murphy (2013). The Pacifism of Duane Friesen. Process Studies 42 (1):110-131.
    This paper reviews Duane Friesen’s version of pacifism, particularly his realist approach, his demand for political engagement, and his proactive peacemaking stance. Second, it demonstrates his connections with process thought, especially around notions of ordered novelty and contrasts, the nonviolence of God, and eschatological openness. It provides three areas of critique and suggests alternatives, specifically concerning Friesen’s Christology, his notion ofrevelation, and his commitment to religious pluralism. This paper offers a form of pacifism for radical mainline Christians who would otherwise (...)
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  27. Timothy Murphy (1997). The Oldest Social Science?: Configurations of Law and Modernity. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book looks critically at some of the underlying assumptions which shape our current understanding of the role and purpose of law and society. It focuses on adjudication as a social practice and as a set of governmental techniques. From this vantage point, it explores how the relationship between law, government and society has changed in the course of history in significant ways. At the centre of the argument is the elaboration of the notion of `adjudicative government'. From this perspective (...)
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  28.  32
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). The Ethics of Impossible and Possible Changes to Human Nature. Bioethics 26 (4):191-197.
    Some commentators speak freely about genetics being poised to change human nature. Contrary to such rhetoric, Norman Daniels believes no such thing is plausible since ‘nature’ describes characteristic traits of human beings as a whole. Genetic interventions that do their work one individual at a time are unlikely to change the traits of human beings as a class. Even so, one can speculate about ways in which human beings as a whole could be genetically altered, and there is nothing about (...)
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  29.  2
    Timothy F. Murphy (1991). No Time for an AIDS Backlash. Hastings Center Report 21 (2):7-11.
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  30. Timothy F. Murphy & Marc A. Lappé (1994). Justice and the Human Genome Project. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    The Human Genome Project is an expensive, ambitious, and controversial attempt to locate and map every one of the approximately 100,000 genes in the human body. If it works, and we are able, for instance, to identify markers for genetic diseases long before they develop, who will have the right to obtain such information? What will be the consequences for health care, health insurance, employability, and research priorities? And, more broadly, how will attitudes toward human differences be affected, morally and (...)
     
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  31.  3
    Timothy F. Murphy (2015). The Tortoise Transformation as a Prospect for Life Extension. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):645-649.
    The value of extending the human lifespan remains a key philosophical debate in bioethics. In building a case against the extension of the species-typical human life, Nicolas Agar considers the prospect of transforming human beings near the end of their lives into Galapagos tortoises, which would then live on decades longer. A central question at stake in this transformation is the persistence of human consciousness as a condition of the value of the transformation. Agar entertains the idea that (...)
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  32.  22
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). Research Priorities and the Future of Pregnancy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (01):78-89.
    The term “ectogenesis” has been around for about a century now, and it is generally understood as the development of embryos and fetuses outside a uterus. In this sense, all in vitro fertilization is ectogenesis, but in vitro development can only proceed to a certain point, at which time human embryos are then either implanted in the attempt to achieve a pregnancy, frozen for that use in the future, used in research, or discarded.
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  33.  9
    Timothy F. Murphy & Robert M. Veatch (2005). Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):50-59.
    In the United States, people may donate organs and tissues to a family member, friend, or anyone whose specific need becomes known to them. For example, in late 2003 dozens of people came forward to donate a kidney to a professional basketball player known to them only through his sports performances. People may also donate a kidney to no one in particular through a process known as nondirected donation. In nondirected donation, people donate a kidney to the organ allocation system (...)
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  34.  21
    Timothy F. Murphy (2013). Getting Past Nature as a Guide to the Human Sex Ratio. Bioethics 27 (4):224-232.
    Sex selection of children by pre-conception and post-conception techniques remains morally controversial and even illegal in some jurisdictions. Among other things, some critics fear that sex selection will distort the sex ratio, making opposite-sex relationships more difficult to secure, while other critics worry that sex selection will tilt some nations toward military aggression. The human sex ratio varies depending on how one estimates it; there is certainly no one-to-one correspondence between males and females either at birth or across the human (...)
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  35.  3
    Timothy F. Murphy (2015). LGBT People and the Work Ahead in Bioethics. Bioethics 29 (6):ii-v.
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  36.  21
    Timothy F. Murphy (2011). A Philosophical Obituary: Dr. Jack Kevorkian Dead at 83 Leaving End of Life Debate in the US Forever Changed. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):3 - 6.
    The nationally-famous advocate of physician-assisted suicide did not die by his own hand. Dr. Jack Kevorkian died the old-fashioned way in America: in a hospital, with multiple disorders undercutting his life. Kevorkian took up interest in assisted suicide early in his medical career, and he wanted prisoners on death row to volunteer for experiments just before their execution. Kevorkian saw individual consent as the wheel, axle, and grease for all decisions in these matters. He helped many people die, but it (...)
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  37.  11
    Timothy F. Murphy (1986). A Cure for Aging? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (3):237-255.
    Arthur Caplan has argued that the presumptive naturalness, universality, and inevitability of aging are no obstacles to conceptualizing aging as a disease since those traits are themselves merely contingent. Moreover, aging lends itself to discussion in terms of diagnostic symptomatology and etiology. Is aging therefore a disease? I argue that aging need not be shown to be unnatural or a disease in order to make it the subject of biomedical interest. I suggest that rather than ask "Is aging a disease?", (...)
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  38.  2
    Timothy F. Murphy (2014). Assisted Gestation and Transgender Women. Bioethics 4 (6):DOI: 10.1111.bioe.12132.
    Developments in uterus transplant put assisted gestation within meaningful range of clinical success for women with uterine infertility who want to gestate children. Should this kind of transplantation prove routine and effective for those women, would there be any morally significant reason why men or transgender women should not be eligible for the same opportunity for gestation? Getting to the point of safe and effective uterus transplantation for those parties would require a focused line of research, over and above the (...)
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  39.  8
    Timothy F. Murphy (2012). The Ethics of Fertility Preservation in Transgender Body Modifications. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):311-316.
    In some areas of clinical medicine, discussions about fertility preservation are routine, such as in the treatment of children and adolescents facing cancer treatments that will destroy their ability to produce gametes of their own. Certain professional organizations now offer guidelines for people who wish to modify their bodies and appearance in regard to sex traits, and these guidelines extend to recommendations about fertility preservation. Since the removal of testicles or ovaries will destroy the ability to have genetically related children (...)
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  40.  7
    Timothy F. Murphy (2014). Genetic Generations: Artificial Gametes and the Embryos Produced with Them. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (11):739-740.
    Certain interventions now permit the derivation of mammalian gametes from stem cells cultivated from either somatic cells or embryos. These gametes can be used in an indefinite cycle of conception in vitro, gamete derivation, conception in vitro, and so on, producing genetic generations that live only in vitro. One commentator has described this prospect for human beings as eugenics, insofar as it would allow for the selection and development of certain traits in human beings. This commentary not only offers this (...)
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  41. Timothy F. Murphy (1984). Nietzsche as Educator. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  42.  4
    Timothy F. Murphy (2015). Assisted Gestation and Transgender Women. Bioethics 29 (6):389-397.
    Developments in uterus transplant put assisted gestation within meaningful range of clinical success for women with uterine infertility who want to gestate children. Should this kind of transplantation prove routine and effective for those women, would there be any morally significant reason why men or transgender women should not be eligible for the same opportunity for gestation? Getting to the point of safe and effective uterus transplantation for those parties would require a focused line of research, over and above the (...)
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  43.  8
    Timothy F. Murphy (2013). The Meaning of Synthetic Gametes for Gay and Lesbian People and Bioethics Too. Journal of Medical Ethics (11):doi:10.1136/medethics-2013-10169.
    Some commentators indirectly challenge the ethics of using synthetic gametes as a way for same-sex couples to have children with shared genetics. These commentators typically impose a moral burden of proof on same-sex couples they do not impose on opposite-sex couples in terms of their eligibility to have children. Other commentators directly raise objections to parenthood by same-sex couples on the grounds that it compromises the rights and/or welfare of children. Ironically, the prospect of synthetic gametes neutralises certain of these (...)
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  44.  3
    Timothy F. Murphy (1990). Reproductive Controls and Sexual Destiny. Bioethics 4 (2):121–142.
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  45.  11
    Timothy Murphy (1981). The Greatness and Limitations of Freud's Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 21 (1):111-113.
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  46.  14
    Timothy S. Murphy (1998). Composition, Improvisation, Constitution: Forms of Life in the Music of Pierre Boulez and Ornette Coleman. Angelaki 3 (2):75 – 102.
    (1998). Composition, improvisation, constitution: forms of life in the music of pierre boulez and ornette coleman. Angelaki: Vol. 3, The love of music, pp. 75-102.
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  47.  9
    Timothy F. Murphy (2013). Adoption First? The Disposition of Human Embryos. Journal of Medical Ethics (6):2013-101525.
    Anja Karnein has suggested that because of the importance of respect for persons, law and policy should require some human embryos created in vitro to be available for adoption for a period of time. If no one comes forward to adopt the embryos during that time, they may be destroyed (in the case of embryos left over from fertility medicine) or used in research (in the case of embryos created for that purpose or left over from fertility medicine). This adoption (...)
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  48.  16
    Robert D. Ogilvie, Tomoka Takeuchi & Timothy I. Murphy (2000). Expanding Nielsen's Covert Rem Model, Questioning Solms's Approach to Dreaming and Rem Sleep, and Reinterpreting the Vertes & Eastman View of Rem Sleep and Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):981-983.
    Nielsen's covert REM process model explains much of the mentation found in REM and NREM sleep, but stops short of postulating an interaction of waking cognitive processes with the dream mechanisms of REM sleep. It ranks with the Hobson et al. paper as a major theoretical advance. The Solms article does not surmount the ever-present problem of defining dreams in a manner conducive to advancing dream theory. Vertes & Eastman review the REM sleep and learning literature, but make questionable assumptions (...)
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  49.  15
    Timothy F. Murphy (1995). Abortion and the Ethics of Genetic Sexual Orientation Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (3):340.
    Reports about possible genetic bases of homoerotic sexual orientation in adults have received a kind of schizophrenic social reception. On the one hand, these reports have been welcomed by some gay men and lesbians as biological confirmation of the commonly held view that sexual orientation is an involuntary trait, that sexual orientation is not in any meaningful sense chosen. Simon LeVay has received mail from thankful correspondents who welcomed his 1991 report about the possible neuroanatomical basis for male homoerotic sexual (...)
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  50.  4
    Timothy F. Murphy (2015). Preventing Ultimate Harm as the Justification for Biomoral Modification. Bioethics 29 (5):369-377.
    Most advocates of biogenetic modification hope to amplify existing human traits in humans in order to increase the value of such traits as intelligence and resistance to disease. These advocates defend such enhancements as beneficial for the affected parties. By contrast, some commentators recommend certain biogenetic modifications to serve social goals. As Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu see things, human moral psychology is deficient relative to the most important risks facing humanity as a whole, including the prospect of Ultimate Harm, (...)
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