14 found
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Timothy P. Jackson [16]Timothy Patrick Jackson [1]
  1.  28
    Timothy P. Jackson (1991). To Bedlam and Part Way Back. Faith and Philosophy 8 (4):423-447.
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  2.  9
    Timothy P. Jackson (1999). Ambivalences About Nature and Naturalism. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (1):137-144.
    As a die-hard supernaturalist, someone "at two with nature" who would be at one with God, the author has mixed feelings about Theodore Nunez's defense of "naturalism." Unlike neopragmatists, the author is not troubled by Nunez's general realism about value; he takes exception not to Nunez's theoretical account of truth, but to his specific axiology. He does not share Nunez's confidence that "projective nature" can provide reliable moral inspiration, suggesting instead that such inspiration can arise only from trust in the (...)
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  3.  19
    Timothy P. Jackson (1995). Is God Just? Faith and Philosophy 12 (3):393-408.
    I defend in this essay the seemingly uncontroversial thesis that God is just. By highlighting the kenotic nature of God’s essential goodness, I rebut arguments by Marilyn Adams, Thomas Morris, and William Alston to the effect that God is too sublime to be bound by obligations to creatures. A straightforward acknowledgement that the God who is Love has freely chosen to be (not merely seem) just, is required by fidelity to Scripture as well as by religious experience. Thus is Christianity’s (...)
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  4.  14
    Timothy P. Jackson (1999). Naturalism, Formalism, and Supernaturalism: Moral Epistemology and Comparative Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):477 - 506.
    If the much discussed fragmentation of the West means that we can seldom hold constructive moral conversations with our near neighbors, why imagine that comparative ethics is feasible as a critical enterprise with a coherent method? How, more specifically, do we understand the relative merits of naturalism, formalism, and supernaturalism as ethical orientations? The author addresses these questions first by examining the meaning of the quoted terms, then by criticizing the inordinate optimism of most naturalisms and formalisms. The article ends (...)
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  5.  15
    Timothy P. Jackson (1987). Kierkegaard's Metatheology. Faith and Philosophy 4 (1):71-85.
    Philosophy and theology have always been, in some measure, a matter of rewriting the past. This can be done with more or less objectivity, more or less insight, however. Of late, the job has not been done at all well with respect to the work of Søren Kierkegaard. His legacy is in danger of being coopted by modem nihilists. I argue in this paper that Kierkegaard’s understanding of truth, subjectivity, and paradox promises, in reality, a middle way between the metaextremes (...)
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  6. Timothy P. Jackson (1987). The Theory and Practice of Discomfort: Richard Rorty and Pragmatism. The Thomist 51 (2):270-298.
     
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  7.  6
    Timothy P. Jackson (2012). “Heroism on an Empty Stomach”: Weil and Hillesum on Love and Happiness Amid the Holocaust1. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):72-98.
    I do four things in this essay: (1) briefly rehearse the biographies of Simone Weil and Etty Hillesum, (2) outline and compare some of the key themes in their lives and works, noting interesting (and also troubling) similarities between them, as well as salient differences, (3) use their examples as lenses through which to look at contemporary attitudes toward altruism vs. self-interest, freedom vs. necessity, eating vs. fasting, and acting vs. writing, and (4) highlight both their strengths and their weaknesses (...)
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  8.  7
    Timothy P. Jackson (1999). Ambivalences About Nature and Naturalism: A Supernaturalist Response to Theodore W. Nunez. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (1):137 - 144.
    As a die-hard supernaturalist, someone "at two with nature" (Woody Allen) who would be at one with God, the author has mixed feelings about Theodore Nunez's defense of "naturalism." Unlike neopragmatists, the author is not troubled by Nunez's general realism about value; he takes exception not to Nunez's theoretical account of truth, but to his specific axiology. He does not share Nunez's confidence that "projective nature" can provide reliable moral inspiration, suggesting instead that such inspiration can arise only from trust (...)
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  9.  7
    Timothy P. Jackson (1990). The Possibilities of Scepticisms: Philosophy and Theology Without Apology. Metaphilosophy 21 (4):303-321.
  10.  1
    Timothy P. Jackson (1992). Waiting in The Wings of the Dove. Renascence 44 (4):227-247.
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  11. Timothy P. Jackson (2011). Love Disconsoled: Meditations on Christian Charity. Cambridge University Press.
    Few concepts are more central to ethics than love, but none is more subject to false consolation. This 1999 book explores several theological, philosophical and literary accounts of love, focusing on how it relates to matters such as self-interest and self-sacrifice, and invulnerability and immortality. Timothy Jackson first considers key aspects of what the Bible says about love, then he further examines the meaning of love and sacrifice through a close reading of novels by Fitzgerald and Hemingway. Lastly, he evaluates (...)
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  12. Timothy P. Jackson (1999). Love Disconsoled: Meditations on Christian Charity. Cambridge University Press.
    Few concepts are more central to ethics than love, but none is more subject to false consolation. This 1999 book explores several theological, philosophical and literary accounts of love, focusing on how it relates to matters such as self-interest and self-sacrifice, and invulnerability and immortality. Timothy Jackson first considers key aspects of what the Bible says about love, then he further examines the meaning of love and sacrifice through a close reading of novels by Fitzgerald and Hemingway. Lastly, he evaluates (...)
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  13. Timothy P. Jackson (1998). Must Job Live Forever? A Reply to Aquinas on Providence. The Thomist 62 (1):1-39.
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  14. Timothy P. Jackson (2001). The Gospels and Christian Ethics. In Robin Gill (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press 42--62.
     
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