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  1. Timothy Rayner, Biopower and Technology: Foucault and Heidegger's Way of Thinking.
    Despite Foucault’s claim in his final interview that his ‘whole philosophical development’ was determined by his reading of Heidegger, to date little has been published exploring the relationship between these thinkers. Undoubtedly, the primary reason for this silence is the seeming impossibility of reconciling Foucault and Heidegger’s work. Indeed, in key respects, we could hardly imagine two more different philosophers. Heidegger seeks to recover a primordial sense of being that he believes has been lost through the history of the West. (...)
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  2. Timothy Rayner (2010). Foucault, Heidegger, and the History of Truth. In Timothy O'Leary & Christopher Falzon (eds.), Foucault and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 60--77.
  3. Timothy Rayner (2010). Mitchell Dean, Governing Societies: Political Perspectives on Domestic and International Rule (Maidenhead: Open University Press, 2007), Paperback, Isbn 9780335208975, 240 Pages,£ 22.99. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 9 (2):249-253.
     
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  4. Timothy Rayner (2008). Governing Societies: Political Perspectives on Domestic and International Rule. Critical Horizons 9 (2):249-253.
     
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  5. Timothy Rayner (2004). On Questioning Being: Foucault's Heideggerian Turn. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):419 – 438.
    Attempts to resolve the question of Foucault's relationship to Heidegger usually look for points of substantive correlation between them: the coincidence of being and power, the meaning of truth, technology, ethics, and so on. Taking seriously Foucault's claim in his final interview that he uses Heidegger as an 'instrument of thought', this paper looks for a correlation in practice. The argument focuses on a structural isomorphism between Heidegger's concept of the fourfold event (Ereignis) of being and later Foucault's critique of (...)
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  6. Timothy Rayner (2003). Between Fiction and Reflection: Foucault and the Experience-Book. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 36 (1):27-43.
    Foucault notoriously suggests that his historical analyses are fictions. Commentators typically interpret this claim in a negative light to mean that Foucault's works are not, strictly speaking, true. In this paper, I present a positive interpretation of Foucault's claim, basing my argument on a hitherto marginalized aspect of his work: the experience-book. An experience-book is defined as a use of fiction in the practice of critique with desubjectifying effects. My argument for this interpretation proceeds in three steps. First, to prepare (...)
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  7. Timothy Rayner (2001). Time and the Event: Reflections on September 11, 2001. Theory and Event 5 (4).
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