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  1. Timothy Stanton (2007). Locke the Thinker. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3:143-67.
     
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  2.  5
    Timothy Stanton (2006). The Name and Nature of Locke's" Defence of Non-Conformity". Locke Studies 6:143-72.
  3.  2
    Timothy Stanton (forthcoming). Natural Law, Judgement and Toleration in Locke. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116653558.
    Locke’s views on toleration and natural law have recently received a ‘reassessment’ at the hands of John William Tate. This article demonstrates some of the many and various ways in which Tate has mangled Locke’s positions and misconstrued the views of interpreters of Locke whose interpretations he finds uncongenial. It finds that there are no textual grounds for Tate’s claims and invites readers to reassess whether and how far they ought to be taken seriously.
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    Timothy Stanton (2011). Christian Foundations; or Some Loose Stones? Toleration and the Philosophy of Locke's Politics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):323-347.
    This essay disputes one of the central claims in Jeremy Waldron?s God, Locke, and Equality (2002), that being the claim that Locke?s arguments about species in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding undercut his assertions about the equality of the human species as a matter of natural law in Two Treatises of Government. It argues, firstly, and pace Waldron, that Locke?s view of natural law is foundational to his view of man, not vice versa, and, secondly, that Two Treatises is written (...)
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    Timothy Stanton (2012). Reply to Tate. Political Theory 40 (2):229-236.
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  6.  5
    Timothy Stanton (2008). Hobbes and Locke on Natural Law and Jesus Christ. History of Political Thought 29 (1):65-88.
    The charge of Hobbism assumes a prominent position in some accounts of Locke's thought. This essay argues that the charge is misconceived, not least because it fails to appreciate the true character of Hobbes's thinking and its relation to Locke's. Hobbes's architectonic retains the traditional intellectual structure of natural law thinking, articulating it around the demands of his metaphysics in ways important for his political theory. Locke decisively rejects this structure and in doing so opens up the conceptual space that (...)
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  7.  4
    Timothy Stanton (2011). Hobbes and Schmitt. History of European Ideas 37 (2):160-167.
    Many commentators are unconvinced by Carl Schmitt's interpretation of Hobbes's political theory which, to their minds, remakes Hobbes in Schmitt's own authoritarian image. The argument advanced in this essay comprises three claims about Hobbes and Schmitt and the ways in which they are construed. The first claim is that certain commentators are bewitched by a picture of authority which biases their own claims about Hobbes, perhaps in ways that they may not fully appreciate. The second claim relates to Hobbes's individualism. (...)
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  8.  3
    Timothy Stanton (2013). Locke, John. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
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  9.  1
    Timothy Stanton (2013). Locke and His Influence. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press 21.
    This chapter examines the influence of Locke in eighteenth-century British philosophy. It argues that a good deal of eighteenth-century British philosophy can be seen, without manifest distortion, as a single sequence of thought, one that developed in response to questions raised in and by Locke’s philosophy. The chapter traces that sequence across several areas of thought, paying particular attention to debates about the nature of ideas, thinking matter, personal identity, the soul, morality, the relations of church and state, toleration, and (...)
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  10.  1
    Timothy Stanton (2011). Logic, Language and Legitimation in the History of Ideas: A Brief View and Survey of Bevir and Skinner. Intellectual History Review 21 (1):71-84.
    Bevir's doctrine of ?weak intentionalism?, developed in the course of his criticism of the work of Quentin Skinner, at once modifies and qualifies Skinner's approach by specifying the beliefs of individuals rather than their utterances as the loci of their intentions and the things that fix the meaning of their utterances. This has the effect of broadening the scope of meaning, by disengaging the meaning of utterances from their status as speech acts, of narrowing the relevance of linguistic contexts, by (...)
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