41 found
Sort by:
  1. Tina Chanter (2013). Heidegger and Gender: An Uncanny Retrieval of Hegel's Antigone. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury. 441.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Tina Chanter (2011). Picturing, Envisaging, or Imaging Humanity. Philosophy Today 55 (Supplement):32-42.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Tina Chanter (2011). Whose Antigone?: The Tragic Marginalization of Slavery. State University of New York Press.
    Argues for the importance of the neglected theme of slavery in Antigone.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Tina Chanter (2010). Antigone's Liminality: Hegel's Racial Purification of Tragedy and the Naturalization of Slavery. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. Tina Chanter (2010). Antigone's Political Legacies: Abjection in Defiance of Mourning. In S. E. Wilmer & Audrone Zukauskaite (eds.), Interrogating Antigone in Postmodern Philosophy and Criticism. Oup Oxford.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Tina Chanter (2010). Irigaray's Challenge to the Fetishistic Hegemony of the Platonic One and Many. In Elena Tzelepis & Athena Athanasiou (eds.), Rewriting Difference: Luce Irigaray and "the Greeks". State University of New York Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Tina Chanter (2010). Review of Daniel I. O'Neill, Mary Lyndon Shanley, Iris Marion Young (Eds.), Illusion of Consent: Engaging Carole Pateman. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Tina Chanter (2009). A Critique of Martín Alcoff's Identity Politics. Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):44-58.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Tina Chanter, The Picture of Abjection: Film, Fetish and the Nature of Difference.
    The Picture of Abjection is an analysis of independent, contemporary, international film. Appropriating Kristeva's analysis of abjection, which she developed in the context of psychoanalytic theory to designate that which a subject rejects as a site of impurity, the book takes up the abject in order to illuminate various intersections of discrimination. The focus is on how race, gender, class, sexuality, ethnicity and nationality intersect with one another in ways that involve abjection. The argument is informed by a variety of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Tina Chanter & Pleshette DeArmitt (eds.) (2008). Sarah Kofman's Corpus. State University of New York Press.
    Draws connections between the life and writings of philosopher Sarah Kofman.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Tina Chanter (2007). Antigone's Excessive Relationship to Fetishism. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (2):231-260.
  12. Tina Chanter (2007). Hands That Give and Hands That Take: The Politics of the Other in Levinas. In Marinos Diamantides (ed.), Levinas, Law, Politics. Routledge-Cavendish.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning In. Hypatia 21 (3).
    : This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Tina Chanter (2006). Lecture 2: Giving Time and Death : Levinas, Heidegger, and the Trauma of the Gift. In John D. Caputo & David L. Smith (eds.), Levinas: The Face of the Other: The Fifteenth Annual Symposium of the Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center. Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, Duquesne University.
  15. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca. Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rex Butler, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon, Tina Chanter, Ewa Plonowska Ziarek & Jeanine Grenberg (2005). James W. Allard, The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Tina Chanter (2005). Conditions: The Politics of Ontology and the Temporality of the Feminine. In Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust & Kent Still (eds.), Addressing Levinas. Northwestern University Press. 310--338.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Tina Chanter (2005). Levinas's Legacy. In Claire Elise Katz & Lara Trout (eds.), Emmanuel Levinas. Routledge. 4--400.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Tina Chanter & Ewa Plonowska Ziarek (eds.) (2005). Revolt, Affect, Collectivity: The Unstable Boundaries of Kristeva's Polis. State University of New York Press.
    Explores how the concept of revolution permeates and unifies Kristeva’s body of work.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Tina Chanter (2004). Abjection, or Why Freud Introduces the Phallus: Identification, Castration Theory, and the Logic of Fetishism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):48-66.
  21. Tina Chanter (2004). Kristeva and Levinas: Abjection and the Feminine. Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (1):54-70.
  22. Tina Chanter (2003). Kristeva's Ethics of Crisis: Artand Abjection, Love and Melancholia. In Edith Wyschogrod & Gerald P. McKenny (eds.), The Ethical. Blackwell Pub.. 5--119.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tina Chanter (2001). Abject Images: Kristeva, Art, and Third Cinema. Philosophy Today 45 (9999):83-98.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Tina Chanter (ed.) (2001). Feminist Interpretations of Emmanuel Levinas. Penn State University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Tina Chanter (2001). Time, Death, and the Feminine: Levinas with Heidegger. Stanford University Press.
    Examining Levinas's critique of the Heideggerian conception of temporality, this book shows how the notion of the feminine both enables and prohibits the most fertile territory of Levinas's thought. The author suggests that though Levinas's conception of subjectivity corrects some of the problems Heidegger's philosophy introduces, such as his failure to deal adequately with ethics, Levinas creates new stumbling blocks, notably the confining role he accords to the feminine. For Levinas, the feminine functions as that which facilitates but is excluded (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Tina Chanter (2000). Abjection and Ambiguity: Simone de Beauvoir's Legacy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (2):138-155.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Tina Chanter (2000). The Trouble We (Feminists) Have Reasoning with Our Mothers: Penelope Deutscher, Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 33 (4):487-497.
  28. Kelly Oliver, Ewa Ziarek & Tina Chanter (2000). 158 N. McAfee Yet There is Another Group of Readers to Whom This Volume is Addressed, Perhaps Primarily: Those Who Have Categorized and Dismissed Kristeva's Work as Essentialist, Heterosexist, and, Due to its Debt to Lacanian Psychoanalysis, Misogynist. Critics Such as Nancy Fraser. [REVIEW] Semiotica 132 (1/2):157-169.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Tina Chanter (1998). Levinas and Impossible Possibility: Thinking Ethics with Rosenzweig and Heidegger in the Wake of the Shoah. Research in Phenomenology 28 (1):91-109.
  30. Tina Chanter (1998). The Temporality of Saying. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):503-528.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Tina Chanter (1998). The Temporality of Saying: Politics Beyond the Ontological Difference. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 20 (2/1):503-528.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Tina Chanter (1997). Editor's Introduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (S1):v-vi.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Tina Chanter (1997). On Not Reading Derrida's Texts: Mistaking Hermeneutics, Misreading Sexual Difference, and Neutralizing Narration. In Ellen K. Feder, Mary C. Rawlinson & Emily Zakin (eds.), Derrida and Feminism. Routledge. 87--113.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Tina Chanter (1997). The Betrayal of Philosophy: Emmanuel Levinas's Otherwise Than Being. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (6):65-79.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Tina Chanter (1997). Traumatic Response. Philosophy Today 41 (4):19-27.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Tina Chanter (1995). Ethics of Eros: Irigaray's Re-Writing of the Philosophers. Routledge.
    Ethics of Eros sheds light on contemporary feminist discourse by bringing into question some of the basic distinctions and categories that orchestrate it. The work of Luce Irigaray serves as a focus for interrogating the opposition between "French" and "Anglo-American" feminism as articulated in the debate over essentialism. Tina Chanter defends Irigaray against charges of essentialism by showing that such criticisms fail to consider the theoretical background of her work. Chanter demonstrates that Irigaray inherited and attempted to move beyond the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Tina Chanter (1994). Commentary: Three Questions for Rudolf Bernet. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (S1):159-169.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Tina Chanter (1994). Three Questions for Rudolf Bernet. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32:159-169.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Tina Chanter (1991). Jeffner Allen and Iris Marion Young, Eds., Thinking the Muse: Feminism and Modern French Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (2):79-80.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Tina Chanter (1987). The Question of Death. Irish Philosophical Journal 4 (1-2):94-119.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Tina Chanter, Antigone's Exemplarity: Irigaray, Hegel, and Excluded Grounds as Constitutive of Feminist Theory In: Rawlinson, Mary C. , Hom, Sabrina L. And Khader, Serene J., (Eds.) Thinking with Irigaray. Albany, U.S. : State University of New York Press, 2011, Pp. 265-292. ISBN 9781438439174.
    Irigaray raises the question of sexual difference. Yet there are moments at which Irigaray’s own pursuit of this question recapitulates the kind of universalism it is meant to combat. She remains ensconced in judgments that close down the attempt to think beyond sexual difference. The article pursues this line of thought particularly in relation to her figuring of Antigone, suggesting that there is a need to open up sexual difference so that it does not function as a universal discourse, but (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation