Search results for 'Tinie Kardol' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tineke Abma, Anne Bruijn, Tinie Kardol, Jos Schols & Guy Widdershoven (2012). Responsibilities in Elderly Care: Mr Powell's Narrative of Duty and Relations. Bioethics 26 (1):22-31.score: 240.0
    In Western countries a considerable number of older people move to a residential home when their health declines. Institutionalization often results in increased dependence, inactivity and loss of identity or self-worth (dignity). This raises the moral question as to how older, institutionalized people can remain autonomous as far as continuing to live in line with their own values is concerned. Following Walker's meta-ethical framework on the assignment of responsibilities, we suggest that instead of directing all older people towards more autonomy (...)
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  2. S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 30.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  3. S. Van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 30.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  4. S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, A. C. Molewijk, M. J. M. Kardol, Jmga Schols & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2011). Organizing Moral Case Deliberation Experiences in Two Dutch Nursing Homes. Nursing Ethics 18 (3):327-340.score: 30.0
    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a specific form of clinical ethics, aiming to stimulate ethical reflection in daily practice in order to improve the quality of care. This article focuses on the implementation of MCD in nursing homes and the questions how and where to organize MCD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate one way of organizing MCD in two Dutch nursing homes. In both of these nursing homes the MCD groups had a heterogeneous composition and were organized (...)
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  5. María Del Rosario Acosta López (2011). A “Tiny Displacement” of the World. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):93-112.score: 6.0
    This paper explores the way in which Agamben takes part in the dialogue on “impolitical communities” that was inaugurated by J. L. Nancy and was soon followed by authors like M. Blanchot, J. Derrida and R. Esposito, among others. Although Agamben’s ontological exploration of ‘whatever being,’ followed later by the political idea of form-of-life, are still very close particularly to Nancy’s work, the article will show in which ways Agamben’s view of a political coming community explores different paths and moves (...)
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  6. J. Paul Kelleher (2013). Prevention, Rescue and Tiny Risks. Public Health Ethics 6 (3):pht032.score: 6.0
    Contrary to popular belief, population-wide preventive measures are rarely cost-reducing. Yet they can still be cost-effective, and indeed more cost-effective than treatment. This is often true of preventive measures that work by slightly reducing the already low risks of death faced by many people. This raises a difficult moral question: when we must choose between life-saving treatment, on the one hand, and preventive measures that avert even more deaths, on the other, is the case for prevention weakened when it works (...)
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  7. M. C. Laskowski, A. Pillay & P. Rothmaler (1992). Tiny Models of Categorical Theories. Archive for Mathematical Logic 31 (6):385-396.score: 6.0
    We explore the existence and the size of infinite models of categorical theories having cardinality less than the size of the associated Tarski-Lindenbaum algebra. Restricting to totally transcendental, categorical theories we show that “Every tiny model is countable” is independent of ZFC. IfT is trivial there is at most one tiny model, which must be the algebraic closure of the empty set. We give a new proof that there are no tiny models ifT is not totally transcendental and is non-trivial.
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  8. Elizabeth Grosz (1993). A Thousand Tiny Sexes: Feminism and Rhizomatics. Topoi 12 (2):167-179.score: 5.0
  9. Gary Alan Fine & Brooke Harrington (2004). Tiny Publics: Small Groups and Civil Society. Sociological Theory 22 (3):341-356.score: 5.0
    It has been conventional to conceptualize civic life through one of two core images: the citizen as lone individualist or the citizen as joiner. Drawing on analyses of the historical development of the public sphere, we propose an alternative analytical framework for civic engagement based on small-group interaction. By embracing this micro-level approach, we contribute to the debate on civil society in three ways. By emphasizing local interaction contexts-the microfoundations of civil society-we treat small groups as a cause, context, and (...)
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  10. Takirirangi Smith (2000). Nga Tini Ahuatanga O Whakapapa Korero. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (1):53–60.score: 5.0
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  11. Christopher J. Martin (2010). They Had Added Not a Single Tiny Proposition: The Reception of the Prior Analytics in the First Half of the Twelfth Century. Vivarium 48 (1-2):159-192.score: 5.0
    A study of the reception of Aristotle's Prior Analytics in the first half of the twelfth century. It is shown that Peter Abaelard was perhaps acquainted with as much as the first seven chapters of Book I of the Prior Analytics but with no more. The appearance at the beginning of the twelfth century of a short list of dialectical loci which has puzzled earlier commentators is explained by noting that this list formalises the classification of extensional relations between general (...)
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  12. Gary F. Marcus (2004). Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates the Complexity of Human Thought. Basic Books.score: 5.0
  13. Carol Bigwood (2004). Standing and Stooping to Tiny Flowers. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):28-45.score: 5.0
    Throughout the paper, I intersperse intimate movement episodes where I respond through my body and personal self to Naess. In grounding his own ecosophy, Naess makes his stand on a very certain place high up in the mountains called “Tvergastein.” His ecosophy T springs directly from his personalhome. Engaging with his texts I find I am not merely immersed in the usual way into a symbolic realm of ideas detached from my body, but have the odd feeling that I must (...)
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  14. Peter C. Grosvenor (2004). Darwin and the Barnacle: The Story of One Tiny Creature and History's Most Spectacular Scientific Breakthrough (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (4):624-626.score: 5.0
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  15. Derek D. Turner (2004). The Past Vs. The Tiny: Historical Science and the Abductive Arguments for Realism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):1-17.score: 5.0
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  16. Christián C. Carman (2005). The Electrons of the Dinosaurs and the Center of the Earth: Comments on D.D. Turner's 'The Past Vs. The Tiny: Historical Science and the Abductive Arguments for Realism'. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (1):171-173.score: 5.0
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  17. Lori Deschene (2012). Tiny Buddha, Simple Wisdom for Life's Hard Questions. Conari Press.score: 5.0
    Lori Deschene's daily wisdom posts about mindfulness, non-attachment, and happiness became so popular that she now has more than 200,000 twitter followers who ...
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  18. Karen Lury (2009). For Crying Out Loud': The Repression of the Child's Subjectivity in 'The House of Tiny Tearaways. Semiotica 2009 (173):491-507.score: 5.0
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  19. Lesley Evans Ogden (2013). Nanoparticles in the Environment: Tiny Size, Large Consequences? BioScience 63 (3):236.score: 5.0
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  20. Botkin Jr (1989). Delivery Room Decisions for Tiny Infants: An Ethical Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (4):306-311.score: 5.0
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  21. Ana Carneiro (2005). Outside Government Science,'Not a Single Tiny Bone to Cheer Us Up!'The Geological Survey of Portugal (1857–1908), the Involvement of Common Men, and the Reaction of Civil Society to Geological Research. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 62 (2):141-204.score: 5.0
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  22. John W. Dietrich (2011). A Foreigner Carrying in the Crook of His Arm a Tiny Bomb by Amitava Kumar. Human Rights Review 12 (4):549-551.score: 5.0
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  23. Sugunavathi Sepramaniam & Kandiah Jeyaseelan (2013). Era of the Tiny Titans: microRNAs. Bioessays 35 (6):502-502.score: 5.0
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  24. Ernst J. Woltering & Truus de Vrije (1995). Ethylene: A Tiny Molecule with Great Potential. Bioessays 17 (4):287-290.score: 5.0
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  25. María del Rosario Acosta (2010). en'A Tiny Displacement'of the Word: On Giorgio Agamben's Coming Community. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16:93-112.score: 5.0
     
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  26. Paul R. Gilson & Geoffrey I. McFadden (1997). Good Things in Small Packages: The Tiny Genomes of Chlorarachniophyte Endosymbionts. Bioessays 19 (2):167-173.score: 5.0
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  27. Oliver Goldsmith (2006). Tiny (Not Small, as Some Suppose) Is Beautiful. The Chesterton Review 32 (3-4):525-526.score: 5.0
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  28. Mark Montebello (2008). An Island Which is Tiny, Though Not Small. The Philosophers' Magazine 42 (42):50-52.score: 5.0
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  29. Pilip Quinn (1997). Tiny Selves: Chisholm on the Simplicity of the Soul. In Lewis Edwin Hahn (ed.), The Philosophy of Roderick M. Chisholm. Chicago: Open Court. 55--67.score: 5.0
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  30. Neil Roy (forthcoming). Director of the Newborn Emergency Transport Service Senior Paediatrician, Royal Women's Hospital This Afternoon I Shall Address the Question of the Economic Cost of Providing Care for Tiny Newborn Babies. I Shall Firstly Analyse The. The Tiniest Newborns: Survival-What Price?.score: 5.0
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  31. Walter M. Elsasser (1987/1998). Reflections on a Theory of Organisms: Holism in Biology. Published for the Johns Hopkins Dept. Of Earth and Planetary Sciences by the Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 1.0
    Are living organisms--as Descartes argued--just machines? Or is the nature of life such that it can never be fully explained by mechanistic models? In this thought-provoking and controversial book, eminent geophysicist Walter M. Elsasser argues that the behavior of living organisms cannot be reduced to physico-chemical causality. Suggesting that molecular biology today is at the same point as Newtonian physics on the eve of the quantum revolution, Elsasser lays the foundation for a theoretical biology that points the way toward a (...)
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  32. Kris McDaniel (2009). Extended Simples and Qualitative Heterogeneity. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (235):325-331.score: 1.0
    The problem of qualitative heterogeneity is to explain how an extended simple can enjoy qualitative variation across its spatial or temporal axes, given that it lacks both spatial and temporal parts. I discuss how friends of extended simples should address the problem of qualitative heterogeneity. I present a series of arguments designed to show that rather than appealing to fundamental distributional properties one should appeal to tiny and short-lived tropes. Along the way, issues relevant to debates about material composition, persistence (...)
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  33. John Leslie (1989). Universes. Routledge.score: 1.0
    One of the first books to address what has come to be known as the philosophy of cosmology, Universes asks, "Why does the universe exist?", arguing that the universe is "fine tuned for producing life." For example, if the universe's early expansion speed had been smaller by one part in a million, then it would have recollapsed rapidly; with an equivalently tiny speed increase, no galaxies would have formed. Either way, this universe would have been lifeless.
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  34. Dan Dennis (2011). Evil, Fine-Tuning and the Creation of the Universe. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):139-145.score: 1.0
    Could God have created a better universe? Well, the fundamental scientific laws and parameters of the universe have to be within a certain miniscule range, for a life-sustaining universe to develop: the universe must be ‘Fine Tuned’. Therefore the ‘embryonic universe’ that came into existence with the ‘big bang’ had to be either exactly as it was or within a certain tiny range, for there to develop a life-sustaining universe. If it is better that there exist a life-sustaining universe than (...)
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  35. Peter Singer, Factory Farming: A Moral Issue.score: 1.0
    There is a growing consensus that factory farming of animals — also known as CAFOs, or concentrated animal feeding operations — is morally wrong. The American animal rights movement, which in its early years focused largely on the use of animals in research, now has come to see that factory farming represents by far the greater abuse of animals. The numbers speak for themselves. In the United States somewhere between 20 million and 40 million birds and mammals are killed for (...)
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  36. Neil Levy (2004). Evolutionary Psychology, Human Universals, and the Standard Social Science Model. Biology and Philosophy 19 (3):459-72.score: 1.0
    Proponents of evolutionary psychology take the existence of humanuniversals to constitute decisive evidence in favor of their view. Ifthe same social norms are found in culture after culture, we have goodreason to believe that they are innate, they argue. In this paper Ipropose an alternative explanation for the existence of humanuniversals, which does not depend on them being the product of inbuiltpsychological adaptations. Following the work of Brian Skyrms, I suggestthat if a particular convention possesses even a very small advantageover (...)
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  37. Carlos Castro (2007). On Dark Energy, Weyl's Geometry, Different Derivations of the Vacuum Energy Density and the Pioneer Anomaly. Foundations of Physics 37 (3):366-409.score: 1.0
    Two different derivations of the observed vacuum energy density are presented. One is based on a class of proper and novel generalizations of the (Anti) de Sitter solutions in terms of a family of radial functions R(r) that provides an explicit formula for the cosmological constant along with a natural explanation of the ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) entanglement required to solve this problem. A nonvanishing value of the vacuum energy density of the order of ${10^{- 123} M_{\rm Planck}^4}$ is derived in agreement (...)
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  38. Peter Godfrey-Smith, Popper's Philosophy of Science: Looking Ahead.score: 1.0
    Is Popper's philosophy alive or dead? If we make a judgment based on recent discussion in academic philosophy of science, he definitely seems to be fading. Popper is still seen as an important historical figure, a key part of the grand drama of 20th century thinking about science. He is associated with an outlook, a mindset, and a general picture of scientific work. His name has bequeathed us an adjective, "Popperian," that is well established. But the adjective is used for (...)
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  39. David McNaughton, Why Is So Much Philosophy So Tedious?score: 1.0
    Deciding on a topic for the Presidential Address is no easy task. There seem to be a number of models. First, the light philosophical pastiche – the philosophical equivalent of a soufflé. Not only has that been done before1, but I could not think of a subject. Second, the standard philosophical paper, focusing in tightly on some tiny part of the picture – but there are plenty of those around (too many, as I shall later argue!) and, in any case, (...)
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  40. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 1.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  41. Michael Jacovides (2002). The Epistemology Under Lockes Corpuscularianism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (2):161-189.score: 1.0
    The intelligibility of our artifacts suggests to many seventeenth century thinkers that nature works along analogous lines, that the same principles that explain the operations of artifacts explain the operations of natural bodies.1 We may call this belief ‘corpuscularianism’ when conjoined with the premise that the details of the analogy depend upon the sub-microscopic textures of ordinary bodies and upon the rapidly moving, imperceptibly tiny corpuscles that surround these bodies.2 Locke’s sympathy for corpuscularianism comes out clearly where he describes the (...)
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  42. David J. Owens (1999). The Authority of Memory. European Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):312-29.score: 1.0
    [FIRST PARAGRAPHS] Nothing is more common than for us to continue to believe without rehearsing the reasons which led us to believe in the first place. It is hard to see how it could be otherwise. Were we obliged constantly to re-trace our cognitive steps, to reassure ourselves that we are entitled to our convictions, how could we ever move forward? We have probably forgotten why we adopted many of our current beliefs and even if we could dredge the evidence (...)
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  43. Ken D. Olum (2002). The Doomsday Argument and the Number of Possible Observers. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (207):164-184.score: 1.0
    If the human race comes to an end relatively shortly, then we have been born at a fairly typical time in the history of humanity; if trillions of people eventually exist, then we have been born in the first surprisingly tiny fraction of all people. According to the 'doomsday argument' of Carter, Leslie, Gott and Nielsen, this means that the chance of a disaster which would obliterate humanity is much larger than usually thought. But treating possible observers in the same (...)
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  44. Paul M. Churchland (1995). The Engine of Reason, the Seat of the Soul: A Philosophical Journey Into the Brain. MIT Press.score: 1.0
    For the uninitiated, there are two major tendencies in the modeling of human cognition. The older, tradtional school believes, in essence, that full human cognition can be modeled by dividing the world up into distinct entities -- called __symbol s__-- such as “dog”, “cat”, “run”, “bite”, “happy”, “tumbleweed”, and so on, and then manipulating this vast set of symbols by a very complex and very subtle set of rules. The opposing school claims that this system, while it might be good (...)
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  45. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2007). WHERE DO NEW IDEAS COME FROM? HOW DO THEY EMERGE? - EPISTEMOLOGY AS COMPUTATION. In Christian Calude (ed.), Randomness & Complexity, from Leibniz to Chaitin.score: 1.0
    This essay presents arguments for the claim that in the best of all possible worlds (Leibniz) there are sources of unpredictability and creativity for us humans, even given a pancomputational stance. A suggested answer to Chaitin’s questions: “Where do new mathematical and biological ideas come from? How do they emerge?” is that they come from the world and emerge from basic physical (computational) laws. For humans as a tiny subset of the universe, a part of the new ideas comes as (...)
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  46. Derek Parfit (1981). Correspondence. Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (2):180-181.score: 1.0
    An act utilitarian tries to maximize expected utility. This is the sum of possible benefits, minus possible costs, with each benefit or cost multiplied by the chance that his act will produce it. Two recent essays claim that, in this calculation, the act utilitarian should ignore very tiny chances. If this is so, he will have no reason to vote, support revolutionary movements, or contribute to countless other public..
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  47. Crawford L. Elder (2011). Familiar Objects and Their Shadows. Cambridge University Press.score: 1.0
    Most contemporary metaphysicians are sceptical about the reality of familiar objects such as dogs and trees, people and desks, cells and stars. They prefer an ontology of the spatially tiny or temporally tiny. Tiny microparticles 'dog-wise arranged' explain the appearance, they say, that there are dogs; microparticles obeying microphysics collectively cause anything that a baseball appears to cause; temporal stages collectively sustain the illusion of enduring objects that persist across changes. Crawford L. Elder argues that all such attempts to 'explain (...)
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  48. August Stern (2000). Quantum Theoretic Machines: What is Thought From the Point of View of Physics. Elsevier.score: 1.0
    Making Sense of Inner Sense 'Terra cognita' is terra incognita. It is difficult to find someone not taken abackand fascinated by the incomprehensible but indisputable fact: there are material systems which are aware of themselves. Consciousness is self-cognizing code. During homo sapiens's relentness and often frustrated search for self-understanding various theories of consciousness have been and continue to be proposed. However, it remains unclear whether and at what level the problems of consciousness and intelligent thought can be resolved. Science's greatest (...)
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  49. Gustaf Arrhenius, Desert as Fit: An Axiomatic Analysis.score: 1.0
    Total Utilitarianism is the view that an action is right if and only if it maximizes the sum total of people’s well-being. A common objection to Total Utilitarianism is that it is insensitive to matters of distributive justice. For example, for a given amount of well-being, Total Utilitarianism is indifferent between an equal distribution and any unequal distribution, and if there would be a tiny gain in well-being by moving from an equal distribution to an unequal, we have a duty (...)
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  50. Borut Skodlar & Claudia Welz (2013). How a Therapist Survives the Suicide of a Patient—with a Special Focus on Patients with Psychosis. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):235-246.score: 1.0
    The article draws from a personal clinical experience of two suicides, not far removed from each other in time. The first patient was a 33-year-old intellectual suffering from depression with narcissistic traits but no psychotic elements, while the second patient was a 21-year-old student with a manifest psychotic episode behind him and with characteristics of post-psychotic depression at the time of suicide. The two suicides had very different impacts on the therapist: the first left open some “space” for reflection, communication, (...)
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