Search results for 'To be Published in' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Helen C. Barrett (forthcoming). Electronic Portfolios–A Chapter in Educational Technology: An Encyclopedia to Be Published by ABC. Clio.score: 603.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Frederick (2000). Of the Darden Graduate School of Business, University of Virginia. All Papers Will Be Reviewed and Comments Sent to the Authors. The Guest Editors Will Make the Final Decision About Which Papers Will Be Published. The Papers Will Be Published in Issue 106.1 of the Journal, Which is the First Issue of the Year 2001. The Deadline for Submission of Papers is May 1, 2000. Please Send Three Hard Copies of the Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (429).score: 603.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. N. H. (1889). Grammatik der Lateinlsche Sprache, Bearbeitet von Dr H. Schweizer-Sidler, Und Dr Alfred Stjrbee. Erster Theil Halle, 1888. This Little Book (of Only 215 Pages) is a New Recension of Schweizer-Sidler's Latin Elementar Und Formenlehre Published in 1869. The Importance of the Present Volume is That its Writers Have Entirely Recast Their Theory of Latin Morphology in Accordance with the Procedure of the New School of Comparative Philology. It is Much to Be Hoped That Some Competent English or American Scholar Will Either Translate the Book Into English, or Write an Original Work of the Same Character. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (06):275-.score: 594.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Denis Collins (2000). The Quest to Improve the Human Condition: The First 1 500 Articles Published in Journal of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 26 (1):1 - 73.score: 540.0
    In 1999, the Journal of Business Ethics published its 1 500th article. This article commemorates the journal's quest "to improve the human condition" (Michalos, 1988, p. 1) with a summary and assessment of the first eighteen volumes. The first part provides an overview of JBE, highlighting the journal's growth, types of methodologies published, and the breadth of the field. The second part provides a detailed account of the quantitative research findings. Major research topics include (1) prevalence of ethical (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Omar W. Nasim (2012). The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.score: 522.0
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a spatial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. William Epstein & Lucinda Wilder (1972). Searching for to-Be-Forgotten Material in a Directed Forgetting Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):349.score: 427.5
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Cathal T. Gallagher, Lisa J. McDonald & Niamh P. McCormack (2014). Undergraduate Research Involving Human Subjects Should Not Be Granted Ethical Approval Unless It is Likely to Be of Publishable Quality. HEC Forum 26 (2):169-180.score: 426.0
    Small-scale research projects involving human subjects have been identified as being effective in developing critical appraisal skills in undergraduate students. In deciding whether to grant ethical approval to such projects, university research ethics committees must weigh the benefits of the research against the risk of harm or discomfort to the participants. As the learning objectives associated with student research can be met without the need for human subjects, the benefit associated with training new healthcare professionals cannot, in itself, justify such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Gillian Brock (2010). Being Reasonable in the Face of Pluralism and Other Alleged Problems for Global Justice: A Reply to van Hooft. Ethics and Global Politics 3 (2).score: 410.0
    In his recent review essay, Stan van Hooft raises some interesting potential challenges for cosmopolitan global justice projects, of which my version is one example.1 I am grateful to van Hooft for doing so. I hope by responding to these challenges here, others concerned with developing frameworks for analyzing issues of global justice will also learn something of value. I start by giving a very brief synopsis of key themes of my book, Global Justice,2 so I can address van Hooft’s (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Steven Pinker, In Defense of Dangerous Ideas In Every Age, Taboo Questions Raise Our Blood Pressure and Threaten Moral Panic. But We Cannot Be Afraid to Answer Them.score: 372.0
    Tell us what you think This essay was first posted at Edge (www.edge.org) and is reprinted with permission. It is the Preface to the book 'What Is Your Dangerous Idea?: Today's Leading Thinkers on the Unthinkable,' published by HarperCollins. Write to controversy@suntimes.com..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Dick Hebdige (1999). It Was Quite Self Indulgent. I Wanted It to Be Monthly so That You Were Out of That Weekly Rut; on Glossy Paper so That It Would Look Good; and with Very Few Ads-at NME the Awful Shapes of Ads Often Meant That You Couldn't Do What You Wanted with the Design.(Nick Logan, Publisher of The Face Interviewed In. [REVIEW] In Jessica Evans & Stuart Hall (eds.), Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage Publications in Association with the Open University. 99.score: 369.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Corvino (2006). Reframing “Morality Pays”: Toward a Better Answer to “Why Be Moral?” In Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):1 - 14.score: 360.0
    This paper revisits the “morality pays” approach to answering the “Why be moral?” question in business. First I argue that “morality pays” is weakest when it needs to be strongest, and thus inadequate to the task. Then I examine and reject a proposed virtue-ethics alternative, arguing that it either collapses into “morality pays” or else introduces a new problem. After sketching an account of moral reasons, I go on to argue that “morality pays” can be reframed, not so much as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Anthony Freeman (2005). The Sense of Being Glared at -- What is It Like to Be a Heretic? Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (6):4-9.score: 360.0
    In September 1981 the prestigious scientific journal Nature carried an unsigned editorial (subsequently acknowledged to be by the journal's senior editor, John Maddox) titled 'A book for burning?' (Maddox, 1981). It reviewed and damned Rupert Sheldrake's then recently published book A New Science of Life: The Hypothesis of Causative Formation (Sheldrake, 1981) and raised a storm of controversy whose fall-out is still very much with us. Up to this time Sheldrake was a well-respected up-and-coming plant physiologist and the recipient (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Raphael Cohen-Almagor, Reply to Rejoinder: Teaching in Class Versus Free Expression.score: 360.0
    Early in 2008 I published Hate in the Classroom: Free Expression, Holocaust Denial, and Liberal Education. A rejoinder was published, and this is my reply to the rejoinder. It is about education and the role of the teacher in the classroom. I argue that teachers should keep their hateful views to themselves and not pronounce them publicly if they wish to serve as educators. Students should not be subjected to teachers who are unable to appreciate difference and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Nicole Hahn Rafter (2006). H. J. Eysenck in Fagin's Kitchen: The Return to Biological Theory in 20th-Century Criminology. History of the Human Sciences 19 (4):37-56.score: 360.0
    In 1964, the British psychologist Hans Jürgen Eysenck published Crime and Personality, the book that set forth his theory of the criminal as a psychopathic poor conditioner. Crime and Personality went through three editions, and even those who vehemently rejected the theory acknowledged it as the most highly articulated and influential biological explanation of crime of its time. Yet today Eysenck’s name is fading from criminological memory - and none too soon, in the opinion of critics who continue to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Nancy A. Zook & Deana B. Davalos (2006). Can Fluid and General Intelligence Be Differentiated in an Older Adult Population? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):143-145.score: 360.0
    The question of whether fluid intelligence can be differentiated from general intelligence in older adults is addressed. Data indicate that the developmental pattern of performance on fluid tasks differs from the pattern of general intelligence. These results suggest that it is important to identify changes in fluid cognitive functions associated with frontal lobe decline, as they may be early indicators of cognitive decline. (Published Online April 5 2006).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. T. Nilstun, R. Lofmark & A. Lundqvist (2010). Scientific Dishonesty--Questionnaire to Doctoral Students in Sweden. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):315-318.score: 360.0
    ‘Scientific dishonesty’ implies the fabrication, falsification or plagiarism in proposing, performing or reviewing research or in reporting research results. A questionnaire was given to postgraduate students at the medical faculties in Sweden who attended a course in research ethics during the academic year 2008/2009 and 58% answered (range 29%–100%). Less than one-third of the respondents wrote that they had heard about scientific dishonesty in the previous 12 months. Pressure, concerning in what order the author should be mentioned, was reported by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jessica M. Wilson (1999). How Superduper Does a Physicalist Supervenience Need to Be? Philosophical Quarterly 50 (194):33-52.score: 354.0
    Note: this is the first published presentation and defense of the 'proper subset strategy' for making sense of non-reductive physicalism or the associated notion of realization; this is sometimes, inaccurately, called "Shoemaker's subset strategy"; if people could either call it the 'subset strategy' or better yet, add my name to the mix I would appreciate it. Horgan claims that physicalism requires "superdupervenience" -- supervenience plus robust ontological explanation of the supervenient in terms of the base properties. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Stephan Lewandowsky, John Cook, Klaus Oberauer & Michael Marriott (2013). Recursive Fury: Conspiracist Ideation in the Blogosphere in Response to Research on Conspiracist Ideation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 354.0
    This article, first published by Frontiers on 18 March 2013, has been the subject of complaints. Given the nature of some of these complaints, Frontiers has provisionally removed the link to the article while these issues are investigated, which is being done as swiftly as possible and which Frontiers management considers the most responsible course of action. The article has not been retracted or withdrawn. Further information will be provided as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience. Conspiracist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Luisa Valente (2007). Names That Can Be Said of Everything: Porphyrian Tradition and 'Transcendental' Terms in Twelfth-Century Logic. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):298-310.score: 350.0
    In an article published in 2003, Klaus Jacobi—using texts partially edited in De Rijk's Logica Modernorum—demonstrated that twelfth-century logic contains a tradition of reflecting about some of the transcendental names (nomina transcendentia). In addition to reinforcing Jacobi's thesis with other texts, this contribution aims to demonstrate two points: 1) That twelfth-century logical reflection about transcendental terms has its origin in the logica vetus, and especially in a passage from Porphyry Isagoge and in Boethius's commentary on it. In spite of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Carol Massey & Deborah Munt (2009). Preparing to Be Creative in the NHS: Making It Personal. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (4):296-308.score: 348.8
    There is currently a clarion call for the NHS to be more creative and innovative, as it moves into an increasingly quality focused agenda. But exactly how easy is it to do this when the NHS performance regime for the last 10 years has been more about delivering centrally driven, specific and detailed targets for improvement, such as reduction of waiting times, than promoting a culture that speaks of experimentation and possibilities rather than certainties. Can a workforce that may not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Harold Bekkering, Detlef Heck & Fahad Sultan (1996). What has to Be Learned in Motor Learning? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):436-437.score: 348.8
    The present commentary considers the question of what must be learned in different types of motor skills, thereby limiting the question of what should be adjusted in the APG model in order to explain successful learning. It is concluded that an open loop model like the APG might well be able to describe the learning pattern of motor skills in a stable, predictable environment. Recent research on saccadic plasticity, however, illustrates that motor skills performed in an unpredictable environment depend heavily (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. William James (1979). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Harvard University Press.score: 348.0
    This is the sixth volume to be published in The Works of William James, an authoritative edition sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jonathan Watts (2012). The Vihara of Compassion: An Introduction to Buddhist Care for the Dying and Bereaved in the Modern World. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):139-155.score: 348.0
    The modern hospice movement is generally understood to have begun with the founding in 1967 by Cicely Saunders of the St. Christopher's Hospice in the United Kingdom. As the movement has grown, it has inspired Buddhists in Asia to rediscover and revive their own traditions around death and caring for the terminally ill and the bereaved that date back to the time of the Buddha. In Asia and the West as well, we are witnessing the work of several groups attempting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Marcus Johansson (2009). Why Unreal Punishments in Response to Unreal Crimes Might Actually Be a Really Good Thing. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):71-79.score: 346.5
    In this article I explore ways to argue about punishment of personal representations in virtual reality. I will defend the idea that such punishing might sometimes be morally required. I offer four different lines of argument: one consequentialistic, one appealing to an idea of appropriateness, one using the notion of organic wholes, and one starting from a supposed inability to determine the limits of the extension of the moral agent. I conclude that all four approaches could, in some cases, justify (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Patryk Pleskot (2012). Does Historiography Need to Be Provincial?

    International Circulation of Ideas as Exemplified by the Cooperation of Polish and French Historians in the Period of the Poland.
    Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):141-154.
    score: 346.5
    Contacts between Polish historians, French historians and French centers of historiography – espcially with the prestigious milieu of Fernand Braudel's Annales – were unusual and extraordinary in comparison with other forms of scientific cooperation with foreign countries: both with the West and the “friendly countries.” Because of the undeniable uniqueness of these relations many scholars from various countries claim that the annalistic methodology “influnced” Polish historiography. What is characteristic, however, is that these statements are most often completely a priori. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Donnie J. Self (1993). The Educational Philosophies Behind the Medical Humanities Programs in the United States: An Empirical Assessment of Three Different Approaches to Humanistic Medical Education. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (3).score: 345.0
    This study investigates the three major educational philosophies behind the medical humanities programs in the United States. It summarizes the characteristics of the Cultural Transmission Approach, the Affective Developmental Approach, and the Cognitive Developmental Approach. A questionnaire was sent to 415 teachers of medical humanities asking for their perceptions of the amount of time and effort devoted by their programs to these three philosophical approaches. The 234 responses constituted a 54.6% return. The approximately 80:20 gender ratio of males to females (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Dorcas M. Kamuya, Vicki Marsh, Francis K. Kombe, P. Wenzel Geissler & Sassy C. Molyneux (2013). Engaging Communities to Strengthen Research Ethics in Low‐Income Settings: Selection and Perceptions of Members of a Network of Representatives in Coastal Kenya. Developing World Bioethics 13 (1):10-20.score: 345.0
    There is wide agreement that community engagement is important for many research types and settings, often including interaction with ‘representatives’ of communities. There is relatively little published experience of community engagement in international research settings, with available information focusing on Community Advisory Boards or Groups (CAB/CAGs), or variants of these, where CAB/G members often advise researchers on behalf of the communities they represent. In this paper we describe a network of community members (‘KEMRI Community Representatives’, or ‘KCRs’) linked to (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Inger Hallström & Gunnel Elander (2005). Decision Making in Paediatric Care: An Overview with Reference to Nursing Care. Nursing Ethics 12 (3):223-238.score: 345.0
    The purpose of this overview of published articles on decision making in paediatric care was to identify important aspects of its possible use in clinical practice and to obtain a base for future research. A literature review was undertaken utilizing snowball sampling to identify articles because of the diversity present within the area of decision making in paediatric care. The databases PubMed and CINAHL were used. The search was limited to articles published in English during the period 1994-2004. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Richard A. Blanke (1985). The Motivation to Be Moral in the Groundwork to the Metaphysics of Morals. Philosophy Research Archives 11:335-345.score: 344.3
    Kant maintained that in order for an act to have moral worth it is necessary that it be done from the motive of duty. On the traditional view of Kant, the motive of duty is constituted solely by one’s belief or cognition that some act is one’s duty. Desire must be ruled out as forming partof the moral motive. On this view, if an agent’s act is to have moral worth, then it must be the ease that his belief that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Richard H. Toenjes (2002). Why Be Moral in Business? A Rawlsian Approach to Moral Motivation. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):57-72.score: 344.3
    Abstract: This article puts forth the thesis that the contractualist account of moral justification affords a powerful reply in business contexts to the question why a business person should put ethics above immediate business interests. A brief survey of traditional theories of business ethics and their approaches to moral motivation is presented. These approaches are criticized. A contractualist conception of ethics in the business world is developed, based on the work of John Rawls and Thomas Scanlon. The desire to justify (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Heidi Albisser Schleger, Nicole R. Oehninger & Stella Reiter-Theil (2011). Avoiding Bias in Medical Ethical Decision-Making. Lessons to Be Learnt From Psychology Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):155-162.score: 344.3
    When ethical decisions have to be taken in critical, complex medical situations, they often involve decisions that set the course for or against life-sustaining treatments. Therefore the decisions have far-reaching consequences for the patients, their relatives, and often for the clinical staff. Although the rich psychology literature provides evidence that reasoning may be affected by undesired influences that may undermine the quality of the decision outcome, not much attention has been given to this phenomenon in health care or ethics consultation. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jasper Doomen (2014). Basic Equality as a Post-Revolutionary Requisite: The Circumstances That Are to Be Taken Into Consideration in the Wake of the Arab Spring. Archiv Fuer Rechts- Und Sozialphilosphie 100 (1):26-35.score: 344.3
    The task to reshape governments in the countries confronted with the Arab Spring prompts the question whether there are necessary conditions to realize a stable society that simultaneously seeks to eliminate the elements that have led to the uprisings. Acknowledging some constitutional rights seems indispensable in such a process. I argue that such a state of affairs is indeed the case, at least now that the 'old' justifications to differentiate between people do not suffice anymore. That is not to say (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. C. Lehner (1997). What It Feels Like to Be in a Superposition, and Why: Consciousness and the Interpretation of Everett's Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 110 (2):191-216.score: 342.0
    This paper attempts an interpretation of Everett's relative state formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the commitment to new metaphysical entities like ‘worlds’ or ‘minds’. Starting from Everett's quantum mechanical model of an observer, it is argued that an observer's belief to be in an eigenstate of the measurement (corresponding to the observation of a well-defined measurement outcome) is consistent with the fact that she objectively is in a superposition of such states. Subjective states corresponding to such beliefs are constructed. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. James Wilson (2009). Could There Be a Right to Own Intellectual Property? Law and Philosophy 28 (4):393 - 427.score: 342.0
    Intellectual property typically involves claims of ownership of types, rather than particulars. In this article I argue that this difference in ontology makes an important moral difference. In particular I argue that there cannot be an intrinsic moral right to own intellectual property. I begin by establishing a necessary condition for the justification of intrinsic moral rights claims, which I call the Rights Justification Principle. Briefly, this holds that if we want to claim that there is an intrinsic moral right (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Laura Valentini (2011). On the Duty to Withhold Global Aid Now to Save More Lives in the Future. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (2):125-34.score: 342.0
    The world is riddled with human suffering, poverty, and destitution. In the face of this moral tragedy, the least that the global wealthy can do is try to support aid programs aimed at relieving the plight of the very poor. Many political leaders, pop stars, and religious personalities have realized this, and routinely urge us to be more sensitive to the conditions of the distant needy. Giving aid thus seems to be one of the most important moral imperatives of our (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Rowland Stout (2012). What Someone's Behaviour Must Be Like If We Are to Be Aware of Their Emotions in It. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):135-148.score: 342.0
    What someone’s behaviour must be like if we are to be aware of their emotions in it Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-14 DOI 10.1007/s11097-011-9224-0 Authors Rowland Stout, School of Philosophy, UCD Dublin, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland Journal Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences Online ISSN 1572-8676 Print ISSN 1568-7759.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Harry Prosch (1982). Polanyi's View of Religion in Personal Knowledge: A Response to Richard Gelwick. Zygon 17 (1):41-48.score: 342.0
    . This paper shows from a close textual study that, although Michael Polanyi used the term “reality” in a generically similar way for what provided the external pole in the natural sciences, mathematics, art, and religion, he consistently made, in Personal Knowledge as well as in later published and unpublished works, a distinction between realities existing independently of our articulate systems in the natural sciences and those existing only in the articulate systems of mathematics, art, and religion. This difference (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dr H. Stefan Bracha (2006). Human Brain Evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-Depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of Fear-Circuitry-Related Traits in Dsm-V and for Studying Resilience to Warzone-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. .score: 342.0
    The DSM-III, DSM-IV, DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 have judiciously minimized discussion of etiologies to distance clinical psychiatry from Freudian psychoanalysis. With this goal mostly achieved, discussion of etiological factors should be reintroduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). A research agenda for the DSM-V advocated the "development of a pathophysiologically based classification system". The author critically reviews the neuroevolutionary literature on stress-induced and fear circuitry disorders and related amygdala-driven, species-atypical fear behaviors of clinical severity in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Gonzalo Rodrigues-Pereyra (2012). Leibniz's Argument for the Identity of Indiscernibles in His Letter to Casati (with Transcription and Translation). The Leibniz Review 22:137-150.score: 342.0
    Leibniz’s short letter to the mathematician and physicist Ludovico Casati of 1689 is a short but interesting text on the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles, to which it is entirely dedicated. Since there is no watermark in the paper of the letter, the letter is difficult to date, but it is likely that it was written during Leibniz’s stay in Rome, sometime between April and November of 1689 (A 2 2 287–8). When addressing the letter, Leibniz wrote ‘Casani’, but this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. A. Vaccaro & P. Madsen (2009). Ict and an Ngo: Difficulties in Attempting to Be Extremely Transparent. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):221-231.score: 342.0
    This paper analyzes the opportunities offered by information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the related ethical issues, within the transparency practices of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Based upon a one-year study of a European NGO, the Italian Association of Blind People, it presents compelling empirical evidence concerning the main ethical, social and economic challenges that NGOs face in the development of more transparent relationships with the public and the related role of ICTs, in particular, the organization’s website. This study shows that, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jonathan Witmer-Rich (2011). It's Good to Be Autonomous: Prospective Consent, Retrospective Consent, and the Foundation of Consent in the Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):377-398.score: 342.0
    What is the foundation of consent in the criminal law? Classically liberal commentators have offered at least three distinct theories. J.S. Mill contends we value consent because individuals are the best judges of their own interests. Joel Feinberg argues an individual’s consent matters because she has a right to autonomy based on her intrinsic sovereignty over her own life. Joseph Raz also focuses on autonomy, but argues that society values autonomy as a constituent element of individual well-being, which it is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Christoph Lehner (1997). What It Feels Like to Be in a Superposition. And Why. Synthese 110 (2):191-216.score: 342.0
    This paper attempts an interpretation of Everett''s relative state formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the commitment to new metaphysical entities like worlds or minds. Starting from Everett''s quantum mechanical model of an observer, it is argued that an observer''s belief to be in an eigenstate of the measurement (corresponding to the observation of a well-defined measurement outcome) is consistent with the fact that she objectively is in a superposition of such states. Subjective states corresponding to such beliefs are constructed. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Matti Häyry (2003). European Values in Bioethics: Why, What, and How to Be Used. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (3):199-214.score: 342.0
    Are there distinctly European values in bioethics, and if there are, what are they? Some Continental philosophers have argued that the principles of dignity, precaution, and solidarity reflect the European ethos better than the liberal concepts of autonomy, harm, and justice. These principles, so the argument goes, elevate prudence over hedonism, communality over individualism, and moral sense over pragmatism. Contrary to what their proponents often believe, however, dignity, precaution, and solidarity can be interpreted in many ways, and it is not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Chalmers C. Clark (2005). In Harm's Way: AMA Physicians and the Duty to Treat. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (1):65 – 87.score: 342.0
    In June 2001, the American Medical Association (AMA) issued a revised and expanded version of the Principles of Medical Ethics (last published in 1980). In light of the new and more comprehensive document, the present essay is geared to consideration of a longstanding tension between physician's autonomy rights and societal obligations in the AMA Code. In particular, it will be argued that a duty to treat overrides AMA autonomy rights in social emergencies, even in cases that involve personal risk (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. A. W. Moore (2014). Immanuel Kant's Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics That Will Be Able to Come Forward as Science. Topoi 33 (1):277-283.score: 342.0
    It is only two years since Immanuel Kant published his monumental Critique of Pure Reason.As part of entering into the spirit of this ‘untimely review’, I shall pretend that only the first edition of the Critique exists. This has a bearing on some claims that I shall make about differences between the content of the Prolegomena and that of the Critique. Despite its formidable difficulty, that book has already generated intense interest in the philosophical community. Those who are still (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. R. Puustinen (2000). Voices to Be Heard—the Many Positions of a Physician in Anton Chekhov's Short Story, A Case History. Medical Humanities 26 (1):37-42.score: 342.0
    Next SectionAnton Chekhov (1860-1904) dealt in many of his short stories and plays with various phenomena as encountered in everyday medical practice in late 19th century Russia. In A Case History (1898) Chekhov illustrates the physician's many positions in relation to his patient. According to Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language, a speaker occupies a certain position from which he or she addresses the listener. A phenomenon may gain different meanings depending on the position from which it is addressed. In his (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. A. J. W. Bennett (2011). Learning to Be Job Ready: Strategies for Greater Social Inclusion in Public Sector Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):347-359.score: 342.0
    ‘Learning to be job ready’ (L2BJR) was a pilot scheme involving 16 long-term unemployed people from a range of backgrounds being offered a 6-month paid placement within the care department of a city council in Northern England. The project was based on a partnership with the largest college in the city specialising in post-16 education and training for residents and employees. The college targeted people as potential candidates for the programme through their prior attendance on or interest in care courses (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. I. Devisch (2011). Nancian Virtual Doubts About 'Leformal' Democracy: Or How to Deal with Contemporary Political Configuration in an Uneasy Way? Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (9):999-1010.score: 342.0
    French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy is acting uneasily when it comes to contemporary politics. There is a sort of agitation in his work in relation to this question. At several places we read an appeal to deal thoroughly with this question and ‘ qu’il y a un travail à faire ’, that there is still work to do. From the beginning of the 1980s with the ‘Centre de Recherches Philosophiques sur le Politique’ and the two books resulting out of that, until (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sally Armstrong Gradle (2011). Performing to Be Whole: Inquiries in Transformation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):54-66.score: 342.0
    Far from restricting my access to things and to the world the body is my very means of entering into relation with all things. In the following work I explore teacher education performance art and examine what it means to be fully aware through the body rather than housed in a body.1 Developing this embodied awareness is important in teacher education because it expands the connections with others whom we teach, increases the sociocultural understandings that mature with reflection, and enables (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.score: 342.0
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. All respondents (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000