Search results for 'To be Published in' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Helen C. Barrett (forthcoming). Electronic Portfolios–A Chapter in Educational Technology: An Encyclopedia to Be Published by ABC. Clio.score: 1005.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Frederick (2000). Of the Darden Graduate School of Business, University of Virginia. All Papers Will Be Reviewed and Comments Sent to the Authors. The Guest Editors Will Make the Final Decision About Which Papers Will Be Published. The Papers Will Be Published in Issue 106.1 of the Journal, Which is the First Issue of the Year 2001. The Deadline for Submission of Papers is May 1, 2000. Please Send Three Hard Copies of the Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (429).score: 1005.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. N. H. (1889). Grammatik der Lateinlsche Sprache, Bearbeitet von Dr H. Schweizer-Sidler, Und Dr Alfred Stjrbee. Erster Theil Halle, 1888. This Little Book (of Only 215 Pages) is a New Recension of Schweizer-Sidler's Latin Elementar Und Formenlehre Published in 1869. The Importance of the Present Volume is That its Writers Have Entirely Recast Their Theory of Latin Morphology in Accordance with the Procedure of the New School of Comparative Philology. It is Much to Be Hoped That Some Competent English or American Scholar Will Either Translate the Book Into English, or Write an Original Work of the Same Character. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (06):275-.score: 990.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Denis Collins (2000). The Quest to Improve the Human Condition: The First 1 500 Articles Published in Journal of Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 26 (1):1 - 73.score: 768.0
    In 1999, the Journal of Business Ethics published its 1 500th article. This article commemorates the journal's quest "to improve the human condition" (Michalos, 1988, p. 1) with a summary and assessment of the first eighteen volumes. The first part provides an overview of JBE, highlighting the journal's growth, types of methodologies published, and the breadth of the field. The second part provides a detailed account of the quantitative research findings. Major research topics include (1) prevalence of ethical (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Dick Hebdige (1999). It Was Quite Self Indulgent. I Wanted It to Be Monthly so That You Were Out of That Weekly Rut; on Glossy Paper so That It Would Look Good; and with Very Few Ads-at NME the Awful Shapes of Ads Often Meant That You Couldn't Do What You Wanted with the Design.(Nick Logan, Publisher of The Face Interviewed In. [REVIEW] In Jessica Evans & Stuart Hall (eds.), Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage Publications in Association with the Open University. 99.score: 615.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. William Epstein & Lucinda Wilder (1972). Searching for to-Be-Forgotten Material in a Directed Forgetting Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):349.score: 598.5
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Steven Pinker, In Defense of Dangerous Ideas In Every Age, Taboo Questions Raise Our Blood Pressure and Threaten Moral Panic. But We Cannot Be Afraid to Answer Them.score: 588.0
    Tell us what you think This essay was first posted at Edge (www.edge.org) and is reprinted with permission. It is the Preface to the book 'What Is Your Dangerous Idea?: Today's Leading Thinkers on the Unthinkable,' published by HarperCollins. Write to controversy@suntimes.com..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Cathal T. Gallagher, Lisa J. McDonald & Niamh P. McCormack (2014). Undergraduate Research Involving Human Subjects Should Not Be Granted Ethical Approval Unless It is Likely to Be of Publishable Quality. HEC Forum 26 (2):169-180.score: 574.0
    Small-scale research projects involving human subjects have been identified as being effective in developing critical appraisal skills in undergraduate students. In deciding whether to grant ethical approval to such projects, university research ethics committees must weigh the benefits of the research against the risk of harm or discomfort to the participants. As the learning objectives associated with student research can be met without the need for human subjects, the benefit associated with training new healthcare professionals cannot, in itself, justify such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gillian Brock (2010). Being Reasonable in the Face of Pluralism and Other Alleged Problems for Global Justice: A Reply to van Hooft. Ethics and Global Politics 3 (2).score: 550.0
    In his recent review essay, Stan van Hooft raises some interesting potential challenges for cosmopolitan global justice projects, of which my version is one example.1 I am grateful to van Hooft for doing so. I hope by responding to these challenges here, others concerned with developing frameworks for analyzing issues of global justice will also learn something of value. I start by giving a very brief synopsis of key themes of my book, Global Justice,2 so I can address van Hooft’s (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John Corvino (2006). Reframing “Morality Pays”: Toward a Better Answer to “Why Be Moral?” In Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):1 - 14.score: 531.0
    This paper revisits the “morality pays” approach to answering the “Why be moral?” question in business. First I argue that “morality pays” is weakest when it needs to be strongest, and thus inadequate to the task. Then I examine and reject a proposed virtue-ethics alternative, arguing that it either collapses into “morality pays” or else introduces a new problem. After sketching an account of moral reasons, I go on to argue that “morality pays” can be reframed, not so much as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Carol Massey & Deborah Munt (2009). Preparing to Be Creative in the NHS: Making It Personal. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (4):296-308.score: 524.3
    There is currently a clarion call for the NHS to be more creative and innovative, as it moves into an increasingly quality focused agenda. But exactly how easy is it to do this when the NHS performance regime for the last 10 years has been more about delivering centrally driven, specific and detailed targets for improvement, such as reduction of waiting times, than promoting a culture that speaks of experimentation and possibilities rather than certainties. Can a workforce that may not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Harold Bekkering, Detlef Heck & Fahad Sultan (1996). What has to Be Learned in Motor Learning? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):436-437.score: 524.3
    The present commentary considers the question of what must be learned in different types of motor skills, thereby limiting the question of what should be adjusted in the APG model in order to explain successful learning. It is concluded that an open loop model like the APG might well be able to describe the learning pattern of motor skills in a stable, predictable environment. Recent research on saccadic plasticity, however, illustrates that motor skills performed in an unpredictable environment depend heavily (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Aldridge (2014). How Ought War To Be Remembered in Schools? Impact 2014 (21):1-45.score: 524.3
    Each year a national day of commemoration of the war dead is celebrated on 11th November in the United Kingdom. Despite public controversy about the nature and purpose of remembrance, there has been no significant discussion of the role schools should play in this event. In this centenary year of the outbreak of the First World War, with the government planning to send groups from every secondary school in Britain to tour the battlefields of the western front over the next (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Omar W. Nasim (2012). The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.score: 522.0
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a spatial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Richard A. Blanke (1985). The Motivation to Be Moral in the Groundwork to the Metaphysics of Morals. Philosophy Research Archives 11:335-345.score: 519.8
    Kant maintained that in order for an act to have moral worth it is necessary that it be done from the motive of duty. On the traditional view of Kant, the motive of duty is constituted solely by one’s belief or cognition that some act is one’s duty. Desire must be ruled out as forming partof the moral motive. On this view, if an agent’s act is to have moral worth, then it must be the ease that his belief that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Patryk Pleskot (2012). Does Historiography Need to Be Provincial?

    International Circulation of Ideas as Exemplified by the Cooperation of Polish and French Historians in the Period of the Poland.
    Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):141-154.
    score: 517.5
    Contacts between Polish historians, French historians and French centers of historiography – espcially with the prestigious milieu of Fernand Braudel's Annales – were unusual and extraordinary in comparison with other forms of scientific cooperation with foreign countries: both with the West and the “friendly countries.” Because of the undeniable uniqueness of these relations many scholars from various countries claim that the annalistic methodology “influnced” Polish historiography. What is characteristic, however, is that these statements are most often completely a priori. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Richard H. Toenjes (2002). Why Be Moral in Business? A Rawlsian Approach to Moral Motivation. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):57-72.score: 515.3
    Abstract: This article puts forth the thesis that the contractualist account of moral justification affords a powerful reply in business contexts to the question why a business person should put ethics above immediate business interests. A brief survey of traditional theories of business ethics and their approaches to moral motivation is presented. These approaches are criticized. A contractualist conception of ethics in the business world is developed, based on the work of John Rawls and Thomas Scanlon. The desire to justify (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Heidi Albisser Schleger, Nicole R. Oehninger & Stella Reiter-Theil (2011). Avoiding Bias in Medical Ethical Decision-Making. Lessons to Be Learnt From Psychology Research. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):155-162.score: 515.3
    When ethical decisions have to be taken in critical, complex medical situations, they often involve decisions that set the course for or against life-sustaining treatments. Therefore the decisions have far-reaching consequences for the patients, their relatives, and often for the clinical staff. Although the rich psychology literature provides evidence that reasoning may be affected by undesired influences that may undermine the quality of the decision outcome, not much attention has been given to this phenomenon in health care or ethics consultation. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Albert A. Blum (1988). Negotiations Needed in South Africa: Lessons to Be Learned From Labor. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (12):933 - 939.score: 515.3
    There is a growing interest in the study of negotiations in order to improve its value in helping to resolve conflict in a host of areas. Unfortunately, it has not been used sufficiently in handling some of the more difficult dilemmas in the field of civil rights. This paper attempts to analyze the evolution of collective bargaining and negotiations in the field of labor relations and makes historic comparisons between the contributions negotiations has made in labor relations and the inadequacy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jasper Doomen (2014). Basic Equality as a Post-Revolutionary Requisite: The Circumstances That Are to Be Taken Into Consideration in the Wake of the Arab Spring. Archiv Fuer Rechts- Und Sozialphilosphie 100 (1):26-35.score: 515.3
    The task to reshape governments in the countries confronted with the Arab Spring prompts the question whether there are necessary conditions to realize a stable society that simultaneously seeks to eliminate the elements that have led to the uprisings. Acknowledging some constitutional rights seems indispensable in such a process. I argue that such a state of affairs is indeed the case, at least now that the 'old' justifications to differentiate between people do not suffice anymore. That is not to say (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. C. Lehner (1997). What It Feels Like to Be in a Superposition, and Why: Consciousness and the Interpretation of Everett's Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 110 (2):191-216.score: 513.0
    This paper attempts an interpretation of Everett's relative state formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the commitment to new metaphysical entities like ‘worlds’ or ‘minds’. Starting from Everett's quantum mechanical model of an observer, it is argued that an observer's belief to be in an eigenstate of the measurement (corresponding to the observation of a well-defined measurement outcome) is consistent with the fact that she objectively is in a superposition of such states. Subjective states corresponding to such beliefs are constructed. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Rowland Stout (2012). What Someone's Behaviour Must Be Like If We Are to Be Aware of Their Emotions in It. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):135-148.score: 513.0
    What someone’s behaviour must be like if we are to be aware of their emotions in it Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-14 DOI 10.1007/s11097-011-9224-0 Authors Rowland Stout, School of Philosophy, UCD Dublin, Dublin 4, Republic of Ireland Journal Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences Online ISSN 1572-8676 Print ISSN 1568-7759.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Christoph Lehner (1997). What It Feels Like to Be in a Superposition. And Why. Synthese 110 (2):191-216.score: 513.0
    This paper attempts an interpretation of Everett''s relative state formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the commitment to new metaphysical entities like worlds or minds. Starting from Everett''s quantum mechanical model of an observer, it is argued that an observer''s belief to be in an eigenstate of the measurement (corresponding to the observation of a well-defined measurement outcome) is consistent with the fact that she objectively is in a superposition of such states. Subjective states corresponding to such beliefs are constructed. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. A. Vaccaro & P. Madsen (2009). Ict and an Ngo: Difficulties in Attempting to Be Extremely Transparent. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):221-231.score: 513.0
    This paper analyzes the opportunities offered by information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the related ethical issues, within the transparency practices of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Based upon a one-year study of a European NGO, the Italian Association of Blind People, it presents compelling empirical evidence concerning the main ethical, social and economic challenges that NGOs face in the development of more transparent relationships with the public and the related role of ICTs, in particular, the organization’s website. This study shows that, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jonathan Witmer-Rich (2011). It's Good to Be Autonomous: Prospective Consent, Retrospective Consent, and the Foundation of Consent in the Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):377-398.score: 513.0
    What is the foundation of consent in the criminal law? Classically liberal commentators have offered at least three distinct theories. J.S. Mill contends we value consent because individuals are the best judges of their own interests. Joel Feinberg argues an individual’s consent matters because she has a right to autonomy based on her intrinsic sovereignty over her own life. Joseph Raz also focuses on autonomy, but argues that society values autonomy as a constituent element of individual well-being, which it is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Max Seeger (forthcoming). Authorship of Thoughts in Thought Insertion: What is It for a Thought to Be One's Own? Philosophical Psychology:1-19.score: 513.0
    In thought insertion, subjects experience thoughts which they claim not to be their own. What they claim, it is typically said, is that the thought is not theirs in the sense that they are not the agent or author of the thought. But what does it mean to be the agent or author of a thought? The most intuitive idea is that for a thought to be one's own means for the thought to causally originate within the subject. I defend (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gabriel Vacariu, Georg Northoff’s (University of Ottawa) Many Ideas Published After 2010 Are Quite Surprinsingly Similar to My Ideas Published in 2005 and 2008, but Are in a Wrong Context, the “Unicorn World” (the World).score: 513.0
    Many ideas from Georg Nortoff’s works (published one paper in 2010, mainly his book in 2011, other papers in 2012, 2103, 2014, especially those related to Kant’s philosophy and the notion of the “observer”, the mind-brain problem, default mode network, the self, the mental states and their “correspondence” to the brain) are surprisingly very similar to my ideas published in my article from 2002, 2005 and my book from 2008. In two papers from 2002 (also my paper from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Matti Häyry (2003). European Values in Bioethics: Why, What, and How to Be Used. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (3):199-214.score: 513.0
    Are there distinctly European values in bioethics, and if there are, what are they? Some Continental philosophers have argued that the principles of dignity, precaution, and solidarity reflect the European ethos better than the liberal concepts of autonomy, harm, and justice. These principles, so the argument goes, elevate prudence over hedonism, communality over individualism, and moral sense over pragmatism. Contrary to what their proponents often believe, however, dignity, precaution, and solidarity can be interpreted in many ways, and it is not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. R. Puustinen (2000). Voices to Be Heard—the Many Positions of a Physician in Anton Chekhov's Short Story, A Case History. Medical Humanities 26 (1):37-42.score: 513.0
    Next SectionAnton Chekhov (1860-1904) dealt in many of his short stories and plays with various phenomena as encountered in everyday medical practice in late 19th century Russia. In A Case History (1898) Chekhov illustrates the physician's many positions in relation to his patient. According to Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language, a speaker occupies a certain position from which he or she addresses the listener. A phenomenon may gain different meanings depending on the position from which it is addressed. In his (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. A. J. W. Bennett (2011). Learning to Be Job Ready: Strategies for Greater Social Inclusion in Public Sector Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):347-359.score: 513.0
    ‘Learning to be job ready’ (L2BJR) was a pilot scheme involving 16 long-term unemployed people from a range of backgrounds being offered a 6-month paid placement within the care department of a city council in Northern England. The project was based on a partnership with the largest college in the city specialising in post-16 education and training for residents and employees. The college targeted people as potential candidates for the programme through their prior attendance on or interest in care courses (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Sally Armstrong Gradle (2011). Performing to Be Whole: Inquiries in Transformation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):54-66.score: 513.0
    Far from restricting my access to things and to the world the body is my very means of entering into relation with all things. In the following work I explore teacher education performance art and examine what it means to be fully aware through the body rather than housed in a body.1 Developing this embodied awareness is important in teacher education because it expands the connections with others whom we teach, increases the sociocultural understandings that mature with reflection, and enables (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.score: 513.0
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. All respondents (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.) (1998). Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge.score: 513.0
    The essays in Daring to Be Good challenge the private/public split that assumes ethics is a private, individual concern and politics is a public, group concern. This collection addresses philosophical issues and controversies of interest to feminists, including prostitution, the ethics of the Human Genome research project as it impacts Native Americans, and reproductive technology. Contributors include:Bat-Ami Bar On, Sandra Lee Bartky, Chris Cuomo, Ann Ferguson, Jane Flax, Lori Gruen and Maria Lugones.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Thomas Moreland (1991). How to Be a Nominalist in Realist Clothing. Grazer Philosophische Studien 39:75-101.score: 513.0
    After comparing three main views regarding the existing and nature of qualities and quality-Instances - extreme nominalism (qualities do not exist), nominalism (qualities exist and are abstract particulars), and realism (qualities exist and are multiply exemplifiable entities in their instances) - an attempt is made to clarify the real difference between nominalism and realism to show the superiority of the latter. This is done by criticizing two alledged realist positions offered by Nicholas Wolterstorff and Michael Loux. Their views are shown (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Morwenna Griffiths, Judy Berry, Anne Holt, John Naylor & Philippa Weekes (2006). Learning to Be in Public Spaces: In From the Margins with Dancers, Sculptors, Painters and Musicians. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):352 - 371.score: 513.0
    This article reports research in three Nottingham schools, concerned with (1) 'The school as fertile ground: how the ethos of a school enables everyone in it to benefit from the presence of artists in class'; (2) 'Children on the edge: how the arts reach those children who otherwise exclude themselves from class activities, for any reason' and (3) 'Children's voices and choices: how even very young children can learn to express their wishes, and then have them realised through arts projects'. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Dina Lavoie (1990). Formal and Informal Management Training Programs for Women in Canada: Who Seems to Be Doing a Good Job? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (4-5):377 - 383.score: 513.0
    The increasing complexity of Canadian businesses in a changing marketplace indicates that women as well as men managers will have to be well trained to be able to position themselves in this new environment with a certain degree of success and personal happiness. As management educators, we have to accept an important share in this responsibility. This paper examines some of the factors that should be considered by those who want to develop management training programs for the future women managers (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Benda Hofmeyr (2006). The Power Not to Be (What We Are): The Politics and Ethics of Self-Creation in Foucault. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):215-230.score: 508.5
    on ethics provides an opportunity to go beyond some of the controversies generated by his work of the 1970s. It was thought, for example, that Foucault had overstated the extent to which individuals could be ‘subjected’ to the influence of power, leaving them little room to resist. This paper will consider the ‘politics’ of self-creation. We shall attempt to establish to what extent Foucault’s later notion of self-formation does in fact succeed in countering an over determination by power. In the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Karola Stotz, How (Not) to Be a Reductionist in a Complex Universe.score: 508.5
    This paper understands reductionism as a relation between explanations, not theories. It argues that knowledge of the micro-level behavior of the components of systems is necessary, but only combined with a full specification of the contingent context sufficient for a full explanation of systems phenomena. The paper takes seriously fundamental principles independent and transcendent of the laws of quantum mechanics that govern most of real-world phenomena. It will conclude in showing how the recent postgenomic revolution, taking seriously the physical principle (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. George Ainslie (2005). You Can't Give Permission to Be a Bastard: Empathy and Self-Signaling as Uncontrollable Independent Variables in Bargaining Games. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):815-816.score: 508.5
    Canonical utility theory may have adopted its selfishness postulate because it lacked theoretical rationales for two major kinds of incentive: empathic utility and self-signaling. Empathy – using vicarious experiences to occasion your emotions – gives these experiences market value as a means of avoiding the staleness of self-generated emotion. Self-signaling is inevitable in anyone trying to overcome a perceived character flaw. Hyperbolic discounting of future reward supplies incentive mechanisms for both empathic utility and self-signaling. Neither can be effectively suppressed (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Marcus Johansson (2009). Why Unreal Punishments in Response to Unreal Crimes Might Actually Be a Really Good Thing. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):71-79.score: 508.5
    In this article I explore ways to argue about punishment of personal representations in virtual reality. I will defend the idea that such punishing might sometimes be morally required. I offer four different lines of argument: one consequentialistic, one appealing to an idea of appropriateness, one using the notion of organic wholes, and one starting from a supposed inability to determine the limits of the extension of the moral agent. I conclude that all four approaches could, in some cases, justify (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Devi Sridhar (2008). Improving Access to Essential Medicines: How Health Concerns Can Be Prioritised in the Global Governance System. Public Health Ethics 1 (2):83-88.score: 508.5
    Dr Devi Sridhar, Department of Politics and International relations, University of Oxford, All Souls College, High St, OX1 4AL UK, Email: devi.sridhar{at}politics.ox.ac.uk ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract This paper discusses the politics of access to essential medicines and identifies ‘space’ in the current system where health concerns can be strengthened relative to trade. This issue is addressed from a global governance perspective focusing on the main actors who can have the greatest impact. These include (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Angie Danyluk (2003). To Be or Not to Be: Buddhist Selves in Toronto. Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2):127-141.score: 508.5
    Buddhist identity: a Buddhist by any other name? When we talk about a ?Buddhist? or ?Buddhists? in Canada and the United States, what exactly is our referent?a label or category, an identity, or perhaps something more? Is the term ?Buddhist? signifying a reified object (or subject?), one that subsumes all sorts of practices, beliefs, philosophies, and preconceptions under its umbrella? Or can the term be used to signify choice, personal commitment, motivation, partiality, and perhaps even struggle? We have a great (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. A. Zepter (2003). How to Be Universal When You Are Existential: Negative Polarity Items in the Comparative: Entailment Along a Scale. Journal of Semantics 20 (2):193-237.score: 508.5
    Fauconnier (1975a) noticed that existential quantification, if it is related to a scale endpoint, can force entailment along the scale and as such have the effect of universal quantification: assume a partially ordered set (X, ⪰) and a predicate Ø such that for all x, y ∈ X, x ⪰ y, if Ø is true of x, it is also true of y; then if there exists an element z that is ordered before all other elements and Ø(z) is true, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. J. Wilson (2008). To What Extent Should Older Patients Be Included in Decisions Regarding Their Resuscitation Status? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):353-356.score: 508.5
    As medical technology continues to advance and we develop the expertise to keep people alive in states undreamt of even 20 years ago, there is increasing interest in the ethics of providing, or declining to provide, life-sustaining treatment. One such issue, highly contentious in clinical practice as well as in the media (and, through them, the public), is the use of do-not-attempt-resuscitation orders. The main group of patients affected by these orders is older people. This article explores some of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Guy Madison (2008). What About the Music? Music-Specific Functions Must Be Considered in Order to Explain Reactions to Music. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):587-587.score: 508.5
    The mechanisms proposed in the target article are quite general and do not address variables specific for music. I argue that reactions to music include motivational mechanisms related to functions of music. To further the field, as the authors envision, consideration of internal mechanisms must be paired with specific hypotheses that include musical and musically relevant variables.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. William P. Bechtel (1996). What Knowledge Must Be in the Head in Order to Acquire Language. In B. Velichkovsky & Duane M. Rumbaugh (eds.), Communicating Meaning: The Evolution and Development of Language. Hillsdale, Nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 45.score: 490.5
    Many studies of language, whether in philosophy, linguistics, or psychology, have focused on highly developed human languages. In their highly developed forms, such as are employed in scientific discourse, languages have a unique set of properties that have been the focus of much attention. For example, descriptive sentences in a language have the property of being "true" or "false," and words of a language have senses and referents. Sentences in a language are structured in accord with complex syntactic rules. Theorists (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. J. Brierley, J. Linthicum & A. Petros (2013). Should Religious Beliefs Be Allowed to Stonewall a Secular Approach to Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Children? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):573-577.score: 490.5
    Religion is an important element of end-of-life care on the paediatric intensive care unit with religious belief providing support for many families and for some staff. However, religious claims used by families to challenge cessation of aggressive therapies considered futile and burdensome by a wide range of medical and lay people can cause considerable problems and be very difficult to resolve. While it is vital to support families in such difficult times, we are increasingly concerned that deeply held belief in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ann Freeman Cook & Helena Hoas (2013). The Truth About the Truth: What Matters When Privacy and Anonymity Can No Longer Be Promised to Those Who Participate in Clinical Trial Research? Research Ethics 9 (3):97-108.score: 490.5
    The ramifications of including genetic components in the clinical studies conducted in non-academic settings create unique ethical challenges. We used a qualitative research design consisting of semi-structured interviews that took place between October 2010 and September 2012. The sample consisted of 80 participants − 38 physicians and 42 coordinators − who worked across a number of different settings, including clinics, private practices, small hospitals, free standing research centers, and blended hospital-institutes in both rural and urban communities in 13 states across (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Tsachi Keren-Paz (2010). Poetic Justice: Why Sex-Slaves Should Be Allowed to Sue Ignorant Clients in Conversion. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (3):307-336.score: 490.5
    In this article I argue that clients who purchase commercial sex from forced prostitutes should be strictly liable in tort towards the sex-slaves. Such an approach is both normatively defensible and doctrinally feasible. As I have argued elsewhere, fairness and equality demand that clients compensate sex-slaves even if one refuses to acknowledge that fault is involved in purchasing sex from a prostitute who might be forced. In this article I argue that such strict liability could be grounded in the tort (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999