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Profile: Tobias Hoffmann (Catholic University of America)
  1.  8
    Tobias Hoffmann (ed.) (2012). A Companion to Angels in Medieval Philosophy. Brill.
    This book studies medieval theories of angelology insofar as they made groundbreaking contributions to medieval philosophy. -/- The discussion of angels, made famous by the humanist caricature of ‘how many angels can dance on the head of a pin’, was nevertheless a crucial one in medieval philosophical debates. All scholastic masters pronounced themselves on angelology, if only in their Sentence commentaries. The questions concerning angelic cognition, speech, free decision, movement, etc. were springboards for profound philosophical discussions that have to do (...)
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  2.  12
    Tobias Hoffmann (2015). Peter Auriol on Free Choice and Free Judgment. Vivarium 53 (1):65-89.
    Some medieval authors defend free choice by arguing that, even though human choices are indeed caused by the practical judgment about what is best to do here and now, one is nevertheless able to freely influence that practical judgment’s formation. This paper examines Peter Auriol’s account of free choice, which is a quite elaborate version of this approach and which brings its theoretical problems into focus. I will argue in favor of Auriol’s basic theory, but I will also propose an (...)
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  3. Tobias Hoffmann (2008). Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas on Magnanimity. In István Pieter Bejczy (ed.), Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill
    Certain traits of the magnanimous man of the Nicomachean Ethics seem incompatible with gratitude and humility. Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas are the first commentators of the Latin West who had access to the integral portrayal of magnanimity in the Nicomachean Ethics. Surprisingly, they welcomed the Aristotelian ideal of magnanimity without reservations. The paper summarizes Aristotle’s account of magnanimity, discusses briefly the transformation of this notion in Stoicism and early scholasticism, and analyzes Albert’s and Thomas’s interpretation of Aristotle. Thomas (...)
     
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  4.  70
    Tobias Hoffmann (2007). Aquinas and Intellectual Determinism: The Test Case of Angelic Sin. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):122-156.
    This paper intends to show that Aquinas gives a non-deterministic account of free decision. Angelic sin is the eminent test case: ex hypothesi, angels are supremely intelligent and not subject to ignorance, passions, or negatively disposing habits. Nothing predetermines their choice; rather it ultimately depends on their freedom alone. All angels acted based upon reasons, but why certain angels acted for an inadequate reason whereas others for an adequate reason cannot be fully explained. Thomas's action theory allows him to explain (...)
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  5.  19
    Tobias Hoffmann (2013). The Pleasure of Life and the Desire for Non-Existence: Some Medieval Theories. Res Philosophica 90 (3):323-346.
    Are there subjective or objective conditions under which human life is not worth living? Or does human life itself contain the conditions that make it worth living? To find answers to these questions, this paper explores Bonaventure, Thomas Aquinas, Richard of Mediavilla, and John Duns Scotus, who discuss whether the damned in hell can, should, and do prefer non-existence over their existence in pain and moral evil. In light of Aristotle’s teaching that there is a certain pleasure inherent to life (...)
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  6.  13
    Tobias Hoffmann (2007). Connaissance Et Vérité Chez Maître Eckhart: Seul le Juste Connaît la Justice. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):407-409.
  7.  12
    Tobias Hoffmann (2013). Freedom Beyond Practical Reason: Duns Scotus on Will-Dependent Relations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1071-1090.
    Most acts of the will have a complex structure, i.e. wanting A in relation to B . Duns Scotus makes the innovative claim that the will itself is responsible for the order of this complex structure. It does this by causing its own will-dependent relations, which he construes as a kind of mind-dependent relations . By means of these relations, the will can arrange the terms of its will-acts independently of any arrangement proposed by the intellect. This not only allows (...)
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  8.  12
    Tobias Hoffmann (2009). Review of The Theological Quodlibeta in the Middle Ages, 2 Vols., Edited by Christopher Schabel. [REVIEW] Vivarium 47 (1):128-135.
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  9.  1
    Tobias Hoffmann & Jasper Hopkins (2002). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 518. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3).
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  10. Tobias Hoffmann, Jörn Müller & Matthias Perkams (eds.) (2013). Aquinas and the Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the text which had the single greatest influence on Aquinas's ethical writings, and the historical and philosophical value of Aquinas's appropriation of this text provokes lively debate. In this volume of new essays, thirteen distinguished scholars explore how Aquinas receives, expands on and transforms Aristotle's insights about the attainability of happiness, the scope of moral virtue, the foundation of morality and the nature of pleasure. They examine Aquinas's commentary on the Ethics and his theological writings, above (...)
     
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  11. Tobias Hoffmann (2011). Conscience and Synderesis. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press
    This article gives a basic account of Aquinas’s theory of “synderesis” and conscience. Aquinas understands synderesis as an infallible moral awareness and conscience as the fallible judgment that applies a general moral conviction to a concrete case. The article also compares Aquinas’s and his contemporaries’ theories of whether erring conscience is morally binding, that is, whether to act in accord with erring conscience or against erring conscience is sinful.
     
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  12. Tobias Hoffmann (1998). Individuation bei Duns Scotus und bei dem jungen Leibniz. Medioevo 24:31-87.
    Leibniz’s first essay, his dissertation on the principle of individuality, is mainly dedicated to a critique of Duns Scotus’s explanation of individuation. Leibniz’s critique of Scotus and the historical antecedents of the German philosopher’s position have not been studied before. The paper examines Scotus’s and Leibniz’s views on individuation and sheds some light on the doctrinal genealogy that leads up to Leibniz’s position. I argue that Leibniz’s view and his critique of Scotus depend upon William of Ockham and Francis Suárez. (...)
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  13. Tobias Hoffmann (2001). Review of Matthias Laarmann, Deus, primum cognitum. Die Lehre von Gott als dem Ersterkannten des menschlichen Intellekts bei Heinrich von Gent. [REVIEW] Philosophisches Jahrbuch 108 (1):175-176.
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  14. Tobias Hoffmann (2001). Review of Être et représentation. Une généalogie de la métaphysique moderne à l’époque de Duns Scot (XIIIe–XIVe siècle). Philosophisches Jahrbuch 108 (2):345-349.
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  15. Tobias Hoffmann (2009). REVIEWS-Martin Rhonheimer, The Perspective of the Acting Person: Essays in the Renewal of Thomistic Moral Philosophy. The Thomist 73 (4):661.
     
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  16. Tobias Hoffmann (2011). The Intellectual Virtues. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press
     
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