Search results for 'Toleration' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2013). Leibniz’s Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological and Pragmatic Reasons. In J. Parkin & T. Stanton (eds.), Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. 139-164.score: 27.0
    Leibniz is not commonly numbered amongst canonical writers on toleration. One obvious reason is that, unlike Locke, he wrote no treatise specifically devoted to that doctrine. Another is the enormous amount of energy which he famously devoted to ecclesiastical reunification. Promoting the reunification of Christian churches is an objective quite different from promoting the toleration of different religious faiths – so different, in fact, that they are sometimes even construed as mutually exclusive. Ecclesiastical reunification aims to find agreement (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomas M. Besch (2010). Diversity and the Limits of Liberal Toleration. In Duncan Ivison (ed.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Multiculturalism. Ashgate.score: 24.0
    To fully respond to the demands of multiculturalism, a view of toleration would need to duly respect diversity both at the level of the application of principles of toleration and at the level of the justificatory foundations that a view of toleration may appeal to. The paper examines Rainer Forst’s post-Rawlsian, ‘reason-based’ attempt to provide a view of toleration that succeeds at these two levels and so allows us to tolerate tolerantly. His account turns on the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Andrew Jason Cohen (2004). What Toleration Is. Ethics 115 (1):68-95.score: 24.0
    Attempting to settle various debates from recent literature regarding its precise nature, I offer a detailed conceptual analysis of toleration. I begin by isolating toleration from other notions; this provides us some guidance by introducing the eight definitional conditions of toleration that I then explicate and defend. Together, these eight conditions indicate that toleration is an agent’s intentional and principled refraining from interfering with an opposed other (or their behavior, etc.) in situations of diversity, where the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Samuel Clark (2009). No Abiding City: Hume, Naturalism, and Toleration. Philosophy 84 (1):75-94.score: 24.0
    This paper rereads David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion as dramatising a distinctive, naturalistic account of toleration. I have two purposes in mind: first, to complete and ground Hume's fragmentary explicit discussion of toleration; second, to unearth a potentially attractive alternative to more recent, Rawlsian approaches to toleration. To make my case, I connect Dialogues and the problem of toleration to the wider themes of naturalism, scepticism and their relation in Hume's thought, before developing a new (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kevin Vallier (2013). Can Liberal Perfectionism Justify Religious Toleration? Wall on Promoting and Respecting. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):645-664.score: 24.0
    Toleration is perhaps the core commitment of liberalism, but this seemingly simple feature of liberal societies creates tension for liberal perfectionists, who are committed to justifying religious toleration primarily in terms of the goods and flourishing it promotes. Perfectionists, so it seems, should recommend restricting harmful religious practices when feasible. If such restrictions would promote liberal perfectionist values like autonomy, it is unclear how the perfectionist can object. A contemporary liberal perfectionist, Steven Wall, has advanced defense of religious (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Susan Mendus & David Edwards (eds.) (1987). On Toleration. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Is toleration a requirement of morality or a dictate of prudence? What limits are there to toleration? What is required of us if we are to promote a truly tolerant society? These themes--the grounds, limits, and requirements of toleration--are central to this book, which presents the W.B. Morrell Memorial Lectures on Toleration, given in 1986 at the University of York. Covering a wide range of practical and theoretical issues, the contributors--including F.A. Hayek, Maurice Cranston, and Karl (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Dario Castiglione & Catriona McKinnon (2001). Introduction: Beyond Toleration? Res Publica 7 (3):223-230.score: 24.0
    Although tolerance is widely regarded as a virtue of both individuals and groups that modern democratic and multiculturalist societies cannot do without, there is still much disagreement among political thinkers as to what tolerance demands, or what can be done to create and sustain a culture of tolerance. The philosophical literature on toleration contains three main strands. (1) An agreement that a tolerant society is more than a modus vivendi; (2) discussion of the proper object(s) of toleration; (3) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Anna Elisabetta Galeotti (2001). Do We Need Toleration as a Moral Virtue? Res Publica 7 (3):273-292.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I reconstruct tolerance as a moral virtue, by critically analysing its definition, circumstances, justification and limits. I argues that, despite its paradoxical appearance, tolerance qualifies as a virtue, by means of a restriction of its proper object to differences that are chosen. Since this excludes the most important and divisive differences of contemporary pluralism from the scope of the virtue of tolerance, the moral model of toleration cannot constitute the micro-foundation of the corresponding political practice. However, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Arash Abizadeh (2013). Publicity, Privacy, and Religious Toleration in Hobbes's Leviathan. Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):261-291.score: 24.0
    What motivated an absolutist Erastian who rejected religious freedom, defended uniform public worship, and deemed the public expression of disagreement a catalyst for war to endorse a movement known to history as the champion of toleration, no coercion in religion, and separation of church and state? At least three factors motivated Hobbes’s 1651 endorsement of Independency: the Erastianism of Cromwellian Independency, the influence of the politique tradition, and, paradoxically, the contribution of early-modern practices of toleration to maintaining the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David C. Durst (2001). The Limits of Toleration in John Locke's Liberal Thought. Res Publica 7 (1):39-55.score: 24.0
    In the following paper I attempt to show how in Locke''s liberalthought the individual is subject to a complex operation involvingliberation and subjugation. In A Letter on Toleration (1685),Locke argues that the individual''s inward beliefs should be freed fromthe coercion of Church and State. To ensure liberty of conscience, theindividual''s soul should be constituted in practice – notstructured by violence but negotiated by rational persuasion. However,as I suggest, the authority of reason is not established without anelement of violence. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Peter Nigel Jones (2010). Toleration and Recognition: What Should We Teach? Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):38-56.score: 24.0
    Generally we think it good to tolerate and to accord recognition. Yet both are complex phenomena and our teaching must acknowledge and cope with that complexity. We tolerate only what we object to, so our message to students cannot be simply, 'promote the good and prevent the bad'. Much advocacy of toleration is not what it pretends to be. Nor is it entirely clear what sort of conduct should count as intolerant. Sometimes people are at fault for tolerating what (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Catriona McKinnon (2007). Democracy, Equality and Toleration. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):125 - 146.score: 24.0
    In this paper I comment on a recent “letter” by Burleigh Wilkins addressed to nascent egalitarian democracies which offers advice on the achievement of religious toleration. I argue that while Wilkins’ advice is sound as far as it goes, it is nevertheless underdeveloped insofar as his letter fails to distinguish two competing conceptions of toleration – liberal-pluralist and republican-secularist – both of which are consistent with the advice he offers, but each of which yields very different policy recommendations (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Richard H. Dees (2004). Trust and Toleration. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This book outlines the social, conceptual, and psychological preconditions for toleration.By looking closely at the religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in France and England and at contemporary controversies about the rights of homosexuals, Richard Dees demonstrates how trust between the opposing parties is needed first, but in just these cases, distrust is all-too-rational. Ultimately, that distrust can only be overcome if the parties undergo a fundamental shift of values - a conversion. Only then can they accept (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Colin Macleod (2010). Toleration, Children and Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):9-21.score: 24.0
    The paper explores challenges for the interpretation of the ideal toleration that arise in educational contexts involving children. It offers an account of how a respect-based conception of toleration can help to resolve controversies about the accommodation and response to diversity that arise in schools.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Sune Lægaard (2010). Recognition and Toleration: Conflicting Approaches to Diversity in Education? Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):22-37.score: 24.0
    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ingrid Creppell (2001). Montaigne: The Embodiment of Identity as Grounds for Toleration. Res Publica 7 (3):247-271.score: 24.0
    One of the most important issues today is the conflict between identity groups. Can the concept of toleration provide resources for thinking about this? The standard definition of toleration – rejection or disapproval of a practice or belief followed by a constraint of oneself from repressing it –has limits. If we seek to make political and social conditions of toleration among diverse people a stable reality, we need to flesh out more deeply and widely what that depends (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Peter Balint (2012). Not yet Making Sense of Political Toleration. Res Publica 18 (3):259-264.score: 24.0
    Abstract A growing number of theorists have argued that toleration, at least in its traditional sense, is no longer applicable to liberal democratic political arrangements—especially if these political arrangements are conceived of as neutral. Peter Jones has tried make sense of political toleration while staying true to its more traditional (disapproval yet non-prevention) meaning. In this article, while I am sympathetic to his motivation, I argue that Jones’ attempt to make sense of political toleration is not successful. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Peter Jones (2012). Legalising Toleration: A Reply to Balint. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (3):265-270.score: 24.0
    Abstract I re-present my account of how a liberal democratic society can be tolerant and do so in a way designed to meet Peter Balint’s objections. In particular, I explain how toleration can be approached from a third-party perspective, which is that of neither tolerator nor tolerated but of rule-makers providing for the toleration that the citizens of a society are to extend to one another. Constructing a regime of toleration should not be confused with engaging in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Saladin Meckled-Garcia (2001). Toleration and Neutrality: Incompatible Ideals? Res Publica 7 (3):293-313.score: 24.0
    Toleration and neutrality are not always distinguished. When they are, they are often offered as two complementary solutions for the problem of achieving political unity and a degree of mutual acceptance within a pluralist liberal polity. The essay shows the concepts to be fundamentally distinct, and then argues that instead of being mutually supporting, they are mutually exclusive. Neutralist liberals, it is argued, must give up toleration in favour of the virtue of neutrality on the part of citizens.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Glen Newey (2001). Is Democratic Toleration a Rubber Duck? Res Publica 7 (3):315-336.score: 24.0
    Democratic politicians face pressures unknown to the prerogative rulers of the early modern period when toleration was first formulated as a political ideal. These pressures are less often expressed as demands by groups or individuals for the permission of practices they dislike than for their restraint or outright prohibition; tolerant dispositions are less politically clamorous. The executive structure of toleration as a virtue, together with the ‘fact of reasonable pluralism’, make conflicts over toleration peculiarly intractable. Political conflicts (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John Kilcullen (1988). Sincerity and Truth: Essays on Arnauld, Bayle, and Toleration. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Philosophical Commentary on the Words of the Gospel 'Compel Them to Come In', written by the Protestant philosopher Pierre Bayle in 1686-88, was a classic statement of the case for toleration at a time of extreme persecution. This collection of Kilcullen's writings on Bayle's work examines a wide range of 17th-century religious and philosophical issues, including Bayle's arguments, Arnauld's attack on Jesuit moral theories similar to Bayle's, the uses and limitations of "reciprocity" arguments, the "ethics of belief," and questions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Burleigh Wilkins (2003). A Short Letter on Religious Toleration. Journal of Ethics 7 (3):239-252.score: 24.0
    This paper takes the form of aletter to fledgling democracies such asAlgeria, Turkey, and Iran. It explores thenature of democracy and argues that theequality of citizens requires that differentreligions be treated equally. It presents some``lessons'''' from United States constitutionalhistory which might be useful to fledglingdemocracies as they seek to achieve aseparation of church and state. Developing atheme first presented in ``A Third Principle ofJustice,'''' The Journal of Ethics 1 (1997),pp. 355–374, it argues that religious tolerationsometimes may require a heightened sensitivityto (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Maria Paola Ferretti & Sune Lægaard (2013). A Multirelational Account of Toleration. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):224-238.score: 24.0
    Toleration classically denotes a relation between two agents that is characterised by three components: objection, power, and acceptance overriding the objection. Against recent claims that classical toleration is not applicable in liberal democracies and that toleration must therefore either be understood purely attitudinally or purely politically, we argue that the components of classical toleration are crucial elements of contemporary cases of minority accommodation. The concept of toleration is applicable to, and is an important element of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. F. Zuolo (2013). Toleration and Informal Groups: How Does the Formal Dimension Affect Groups' Capacity to Tolerate? European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):288-305.score: 24.0
    The ‘agents’ of toleration can be divided into three categories: public institutions, groups and individuals. If it is mostly accepted that both public institutions and individuals are capable of toleration, it is not clear that such a capacity can be attributed to groups, although in daily discourse we seem ready to say that a certain social group is (in)tolerant. This article aims to address this issue by investigating the relationship between collective agency and social groups. Formal groups (e.g. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Melissa Williams & Jeremy Waldron (eds.) (2008). Nomos XLVIII: Toleration and Its Limits. NYU Press.score: 24.0
    Toleration has a rich tradition in Western political philosophy. It is, after all, one of the defining topics of political philosophy—historically pivotal in the development of modern liberalism, prominent in the writings of such canonical figures as John Locke and John Stuart Mill, and central to our understanding of the idea of a society in which individuals have the right to live their own lives by their own values, left alone by the state so long as they respect the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Andrew Shorten (2005). Toleration and Cultural Controversies. Res Publica 11 (3):275-299.score: 24.0
    Multicultural societies are far more likely than others to include minorities committed to the pursuit of practices that offend the majority, and treating the cultural commitments of all citizens fairly will require some set of guiding principles to distinguish tolerable ‘cultural controversies’ from intolerable ones. This paper does not directly address the moral question at stake here (i.e. demarcating the limits of toleration) but rather seeks to provide a politically justifiable normative argument to explain when tolerant restraint is necessary, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Mitch Avila (2011). Human Rights and Toleration in Rawls. Human Rights Review 12 (1):1-14.score: 24.0
    In a Society of Peoples as Rawls conceives it, human rights function as “criteria for toleration.” This paper defends the conception of human rights that appears in Rawls’ The Law of Peoples as normatively and theoretically adequate. I claim that human rights function as criteria for determining whether or not a given society or legal system can be tolerated. As such, “human rights” are not themselves basic facts or judgments or ascriptions, but rather the means by which we collectively (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Frederick Schauer (forthcoming). On the Utility of Religious Toleration. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-14.score: 22.0
    Brian Leiter’s Why Tolerate Religion? valuably clarifies the issues involved in granting religion-specific accommodations (and thus exceptions or exemptions) to laws and policies of general application. His arguments are careful, rigorous, and fair, and in rejecting the deontological arguments for religion-specific accommodations he seems to me largely correct. But when he turns to arguing against the utilitarian case for such accommodations, he employs a seemingly non-standard sense of utilitarianism in which demands of principled consistency constrain what would otherwise be utilitarian (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John Horton & Susan Mendus (eds.) (1985). Aspects of Toleration: Philosophical Studies. Methuen.score: 21.0
    Introduction JOHN HORTON AND SUSAN MENDUS The essays in this volume are concerned with the theoretical and conceptual issues involved in the idea of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Andrew Fiala, Toleration. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
  31. Emanuela Ceva, Toleration. Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.score: 21.0
  32. Sune Laegaard (2010). Recognition and Toleration: Conflicting Approaches to Diversity in Education? Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):22-37.score: 21.0
  33. Voltaire (1935/1994). A Treatise on Toleration and Other Essays. Prometheus Books.score: 21.0
  34. Magali Bessone, Gideon Calder & Federico Zuolo (forthcoming). How Groups Matter: Challenges of Toleration in Pluralistic Societies. Routledge.score: 21.0
    When groups feature in political philosophy, it is usually in one of three contexts: the redressing of past or current injustices suffered by ethnic or cultural minorities; the nature and scope of group rights; and questions around how institutions are supposed to treat a certain specific identity/cultural/ethnic group. What is missing from these debates is a comprehensive analysis of groups as both agents and objects of social policies. While this has been subject to much scrutiny by sociologists and social psychologists, (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Walker Brian (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1).score: 21.0
  36. John Locke (1984). A Letter Concerning Toleration ; the Second Treatise of Government ; an Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Franklin Library.score: 21.0
  37. John Locke (1965/1979). Treatise of Civil Government and a Letter Concerning Toleration. Irvington.score: 21.0
  38. Mario Montuori (1983). John Locke on Toleration and the Unity of God. J.C. Gieben.score: 21.0
  39. Matthew Pianalto (2011). Moral Conviction and Disagreement: Getting Beyond Negative Toleration. In Danielle Poe (ed.), Communities of Peace: Confronting Injustice and Creating Justice. Rodopi.score: 21.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jovan Babić (2004). Toleration Vs. Doctrinal Evil in Our Time. Journal of Ethics 8 (3):225-250.score: 20.0
    Our time is characterized by what seems like an unprecedented process of intense global homogenization. This reality provides the context for exploring the nature and value of toleration. Hence, this essay is meant primarily as a contribution to international ethics rather than political philosophy. It is argued that because of the non-eliminability of differences in the world we should not even hope that there can be only one global religion or ideology. Further exploration exposes conceptual affinity between the concepts (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Philip J. Ivanhoe (2009). Pluralism, Toleration, and Ethical Promiscuity. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):311-329.score: 20.0
    This paper argues that from an ethical point of view tolerance, which is simply one of a number of possible responses to ethical pluralism, is not an acceptable ideal. It fails to acknowledge and appreciate the good in other forms of life and thereby does not adequately respect the people who live these lives. Toleration limits the range of goods we might appreciate in our own lives and in the lives of those we care most about, and it tends (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. James Bohman (2003). Deliberative Toleration. Political Theory 31 (6):757-779.score: 18.0
    Political liberals now defend what Rawls calls the "inclusive view" of public reason with the appropriate ideal of reasonable pluralism. Against the application of such a liberal conception of toleration to deliberative democracy "the open view of toleration is with no constraints" is the only regime of toleration that can be democratically justified. Recent debates about the public or nonpublic character of religious reasons provide a good test case and show why liberal deliberative theories are intolerant and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Locke (2013). A Letter Concerning Toleration. Broadview Press.score: 18.0
    Locke argued that religious belief ought to be compatible with reason, that no king, prince or magistrate rules legitimately without the consent of the people, and that government has no right to impose religious beliefs or styles of worship on the public. Locke's defense of religious tolerance and freedom of thought was revolutionary in its time. Even today, his letter poses a challenge to religious intolerance, whether state-sponsored or originating from religious dogmatists. -/- Based on both Locke's original Latin and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Medhat Khattar (2011). Toleration, Civility, and Absolute Presuppositions. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 16 (1-2):113-135.score: 18.0
    This article argues that toleration understood as the principled restraint from the use of force is an instance of RG. Collingwood's 'ideal of civility' towards which liberalism as the process of civilisation aspires. In the first part of this article, Toleration as Civility, I draw on Collingwood's philosophy to provide an account of toleration as an instance of civility embodying self-respect, historical consciousness, and complete freedom of the will. Accordingly, the limits of toleration are conceived as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. John Horton (2011). Why the Traditional Conception of Toleration Still Matters. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):289-305.score: 18.0
    The ?traditional? conception of toleration, understood as the putting up with beliefs and practices by those who disapprove of them, has come under increasing attack in recent years for being negative, condescending and judgemental. Instead, its critics argue for a more positive, affirmative conception, perhaps best captured by Anna Elisabetta Galeotti?s idea of ?toleration as recognition?. In this article, without denying that it is not always the most appropriate form of response to differences, I defend the traditional conception (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. T. Porter (2012). Rawls, Reasonableness, and International Toleration. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (4):382-414.score: 18.0
    Rawls’s account of international toleration in The Law of Peoples has been the subject of vigorous critiques by critics who believe that he unacceptably dilutes the principles of his Law of Peoples in order to accommodate non-liberal societies. One important component in these critiques takes issue specifically with Rawls’s inclusion of certain non-liberal societies (‘decent peoples’) in the constituency of justification for the Law of Peoples. In Rawls’s defence, I argue that the explanation for the inclusion of decent peoples (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Derek Edyvane & Matt Matravers (2011). Introduction: Toleration Re-Examined. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):281-288.score: 18.0
    This introduction considers recent work in toleration; the nature and definition of toleration; and the relationship between toleration and broader questions of political philosophy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Peter Jones (2012). Toleration, Religion and Accommodation. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 18.0
    Issues of religious toleration might be thought dead and advocacy of religious toleration a pointless exercise in preaching to the converted, at least in most contemporary European societies. This paper challenges that view. It does so principally by focusing on issues of religious accommodation as these arise in contemporary multi-faith societies. Drawing on the cases of exemption, Article 9 of the ECHR, and law governing indirect religious discrimination, it argues that issues and instances of accommodation are issues and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Micah Schwartzman (2005). The Relevance of Locke's Religious Arguments for Toleration. Political Theory 33 (5):678 - 705.score: 18.0
    John Locke's theory of toleration has been criticized as having little relevance for politics today because it rests on controversial theological foundations. Although there have been some recent attempts to develop secular; or publicly accessible, arguments out of Locke's writings, these tend to obscure and distort the religious arguments that Locke used to defend toleration. More importantly, these efforts ignore the role that religious arguments may play in supporting the development of a normative consensus on the legitimacy of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Timothy Stanton (2011). Christian Foundations; or Some Loose Stones? Toleration and the Philosophy of Locke's Politics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):323-347.score: 18.0
    This essay disputes one of the central claims in Jeremy Waldron?s God, Locke, and Equality (2002), that being the claim that Locke?s arguments about species in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding undercut his assertions about the equality of the human species as a matter of natural law in Two Treatises of Government. It argues, firstly, and pace Waldron, that Locke?s view of natural law is foundational to his view of man, not vice versa, and, secondly, that Two Treatises is written (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000