Search results for 'Tom Beckett' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Theorizing Beckett (2002). Part I Theorizing Beckett and Philosophy. In Richard J. Lane (ed.), Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave. 9.score: 150.0
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  2. Tom Beckett & Graham Harman (2011). Interview with Graham Harman. Ask/Tell.score: 120.0
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  3. Kelvin Stewart Beckett (2011). R.S. Peters and the Concept of Education. Educational Theory 61 (3):239-255.score: 60.0
    In this essay Kelvin Beckett argues that Richard Peters's major work on education, Ethics and Education, belongs on a short list of important texts we can all share. He argues this not because of the place it has in the history of philosophy of education, as important as that is, but because of the contribution it can still make to the future of the discipline. The limitations of Peters's analysis of the concept of education in his chapter on “Criteria (...)
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  4. Chris Beckett (2005). Values & Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction. Sage.score: 30.0
    In social work there is seldom an uncontroversial `right way' of doing things. So how will you deal with the value questions and ethical dilemmas that you will be faced with as a professional social worker? This lively and readable introductory text is designed to equip students with a sound understanding of the principles of values and ethics which no social worker should be without. Bridging the gap between theory and practice, this book successfully explores the complexities of ethical issues, (...)
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  5. Paul Hager & David Beckett (1995). Philosophical Underpinnings of the Integrated Conception of Competence. Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (1):1–24.score: 30.0
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  6. E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2001). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.score: 30.0
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A set (...)
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  7. R. B. Beckett (1964). Photogenic Drawings. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 27:342-343.score: 30.0
  8. David Beckett (2004). Embodied Competence and Generic Skill: The Emergence of Inferential Understanding. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (5):497–508.score: 30.0
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  9. E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino (2002). Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics - Volume 10, Number 2 (2001), Pages 165-183. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):138-138.score: 30.0
     
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  10. David Beckett & Paul Hager (2003). Rejoinder: Learning From Work: Can Kant Do? Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (1):123–127.score: 30.0
  11. Kelvin Beckett (1983). Transmission. Journal of Philosophy of Education 17 (2):201–205.score: 30.0
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  12. Lucy Beckett (1997). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (2):407-410.score: 30.0
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  13. David Beckett & Paul Hager (1999). Guest Editorial. Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (3):271–272.score: 30.0
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  14. Kelvin Beckett (1985). Growth Theory Reconsidered. Journal of Philosophy of Education 19 (1):49–54.score: 30.0
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  15. David Beckett (1995). Professional Practice for Educators: The Getting of Wisdom? Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (2):15–34.score: 30.0
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  16. Gary Winship (2011). Chess & Schizophrenia: Murphy V Mr Endon, Beckett V Bion. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):339-351.score: 18.0
    This paper reconvenes Samuel Beckett’s psychotherapy with Wilfred Bion during 1934–1936 during which time Beckett’s conceived and began writing this second novel, Murphy . Based on Beckett’s visits to the Bethlem & Maudsley Hospital and his observation of the male nurses, the climax of Murphy is a chess match between Mr Endon (a male schizophrenic patient) and Murphy (a male psychiatric nurse). The precise notation of the Endon v Murphy chess match tells us that the Beckett (...)
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  17. Guadalupe Lucero (2012). Agotar la lengua: Beckett a través de Deleuze. Daímon 55:121-141.score: 18.0
    Nos proponemos recorrer aquí algunas de las líneas de fuerza que permiten vincular la obra de Samuel Beckett con la estética desarrollada en los escritos de Gilles Deleuze. Para ello dedicaremos un primer apartado a las relaciones entre Beckett y la filosofía, para hacer patente allí la afinidad con algunas de las fuentes fundamentales de la filosofía deleuziana, como Nietzsche, Spinoza y la distancia con aquel que se constituye como uno de sus “enemigos” filosóficos: Martin Heidegger. Plantearemos luego (...)
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  18. Nuria Sánchez Madrid (2012). Filosofia, Tom E ilusão musical em Kant. Da vivificação sonora do ânimo à recepção do Tom da razão. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (1):47-72.score: 18.0
    O artigo tenciona, primeiramente, enriquecer o estudo da função que o conceito de tom desempenha na ideia kantiana de razão, ao estendê-lo à análise da música como arte dos sons que a Crítica do Juízo contém. Em segundo lugar, propõe-se determinar os motivos pelos quais a matemática se revela incapaz, devido à especificidade do método filosófico e à corporalidade da ecepção musical, respectivamente, de expressar o modo de proceder da razão e da arte dos sons. Finalmente, aponta-se para uma semelhança (...)
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  19. John Draeger (2011). What Peeping Tom Did Wrong. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):41-49.score: 12.0
    Voyeurism seems creepy. This paper considers whether these feelings are well-founded. It identifies a variety of ethically troubling features, including harmful consequences, deceit, and the violation of various religious, legal, and conventional norms. Voyeurism is something of a moral misdemeanor that seems worrisome when associated with these other failings. However, because voyeurism remains troubling even in the absence of harm or deceit, we must pay special attention to the ways complex social conventions can be used to show disrespect for others. (...)
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  20. Adam Leite (2007). Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly's "Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456–464.score: 12.0
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
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  21. Anthony Uhlmann (1999). Beckett and Poststructuralism. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    In Beckett and Poststructuralism, Anthony Uhlmann offers a reading of Beckett in relation to recent French philosophy, particularly the work of Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, Levinas, and Derrida. Uhlmann offers a work of literary criticism that is also a piece of intellectual history, emphasising how Beckett develops a kind of critical thinking which differs from yet is just as powerful as that of philosophers who, along with Beckett, found themselves faced with sets of ethical problems which (...)
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  22. Tom Baldwin (2002). The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):1–24.score: 12.0
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  23. Richard J. Lane (ed.) (2002). Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave.score: 12.0
    Beckett and Philosophy examines and interrogates the relationships between Samuel Beckett's works and contemporary French and German thought. There are two wide-ranging overview chapters by Richard Begam (Beckett and Postfoundationalism) and Robert Eaglestone (Beckett via Literary and Philosophical Theories), and individual chapters on Beckett, Derrida, Foucault, Deleuze, Badious, Merleau-Pointy, Adorno, Hebermas, Heidegger and Nietzsche. The collection takes a fresh look as issues such as postmodern and poststructuralist thought in relation to Beckett studies, providing useful (...)
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  24. Andrea Oppo (2008). Philosophical Aesthetics and Samuel Beckett. Peter Lang.score: 12.0
    This book examines the role of Samuel Beckett in contemporary philosophical aesthetics, primarily through analysis of both his own essays and the various ...
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  25. Erika Gaudlitz (2010). Stuttering in Beckett as Liminal Expression Within the Deleuzian Critical-Clinical Hypothesis. Deleuze Studies 4 (2):183-205.score: 12.0
    This paper inquires into the nexus between the Deleuzian critical-clinical hypothesis and its literary instantiation in Beckett, with a focus on How It Is (1964) and Worstward Ho (1983b). I propose to read the interruptions in style symptomatically, and stuttering language in Beckett as liminal expression, thus tracing the flows and breaks of desire which Deleuze theorises in the sense of a symptomatological unconscious. The schizoid style as liminal expression exemplified in Beckett's work will be read as (...)
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  26. Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2013). How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.score: 12.0
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to attribute (...)
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  27. Anthony Uhlmann (2006). Samuel Beckett and the Philosophical Image. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Beckett often made use of images from the visual arts and readapted them, staging them in his plays, or using them in his fiction. Anthony Uhlmann sets out to explain how an image differs from other terms, like 'metaphor' or 'representation', and, in the process, to analyse Beckett's use of images borrowed from philosophy and aesthetics. This is the first study to carefully examine Beckett's thoughts on the image in his literary works and his extensive notes to (...)
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  28. Stephen Jan (1999). A New Perspective on Economic Analysis in Health Care?: A Critical Review of 'The Economics of Health Reconsidered' by Tom Rice. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (1):99-106.score: 12.0
    A recently published book, 'The Economics of Health Reconsidered' by Tom Rice, provides a strong critique of the role of markets in health care. Many of the issues of 'market failure' raised by Rice, however, have been, to varying extents, recognised previously in the health economics literature (at least outside the U.S.). What perhaps sets Rice's book apart from previous attempts to document such issues is its elegance and the methodical manner in which this critique is delivered. Significantly the critique (...)
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  29. Tom Bivins (1995). A Spot News Approach to Newsroom Ethics: A Book Review by Tom Bivins. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):185 – 187.score: 12.0
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  30. Andrew Gibson (2007). Beckett and Badiou: The Pathos of Intermittency. OUP Oxford.score: 12.0
    Beckett and Badiou offers a provocative new reading of Samuel Beckett's work on the basis of a full, critical account of the thought of Alain Badiou. Badiou is the most eminent of contemporary French philosophers. His devotion to Beckett's work has been lifelong. Yet for Badiou philosophy must be integrally affirmative, whilst Beckett apparently commits his art to a work of negation. Beckett and Badiou explores the coherences, contradictions, and extreme complexities of the intellectual relationship (...)
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  31. Eric Foner (2005). Tom Paine and Revolutionary America. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Since its publication in 1976, Tom Paine and Revolutionary America has been recognized as a classic study of the career of the foremost political pamphleteer of the Age of Revolution, and a model of how to integrate the political, intellectual, and social history of the struggle for American independence. Foner skillfully brings together an account of Paine's remarkable career with a careful examination of the social worlds within which he operated, in Great Britain, France, and especially the United States. He (...)
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  32. Tom Shakespeare (2010). Selecting Barrenness - A Response From Tom Shakespeare. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):22-24.score: 12.0
    A response to Kavita Shah's article Selecting Barrenness.
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  33. Tom Brislin (1995). A Journalism of Philosophy: A Book Review by Tom Brislin. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):49 – 51.score: 12.0
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  34. Elisabeth Marie Loevlie (2003). Literary Silences in Pascal, Rousseau, and Beckett. OUP Oxford.score: 12.0
    To explore literary silence is to explore the relationships between literary texts and the silence of the ineffable. It is to enquire what dynamics texts develop as they strive to 'say the unsayable', and it is to think literature as a silence that speaks itself. This study describes these literary and silent dynamics through readings of Pascal's Pensées, Rousseau's Rêveries, and Beckett's trilogy Molloy, Malone meurt, and L'Innommable. It contributes to our understanding of three major writers and challenges our (...)
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  35. Daniel Koczy (2012). A Crystal-Theatre: Automation and Crystalline Description in the Theatre of Samuel Beckett. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):614-627.score: 12.0
    Throughout his cinema studies, Deleuze tends to define and to praise the cinematic in opposition to the theatrical. Cinema, for Deleuze, retains the potential to automate our perception of its images. Further, this capacity allows the cinema to profoundly disrupt the habitual patterns of its audience's thought. This article asks, however, whether Beckett's theatrical practice can be productively analysed through concepts derived from Deleuze's work on the cinema. In Beckett's Play and Not I, we see theatrical productions that (...)
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  36. Tom Stonier (1999). Tom Stonier's Response. World Futures 53 (4):375-376.score: 12.0
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  37. Audronė Žukauskaitė (2012). Potentiality as a Life: Deleuze, Agamben, Beckett. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):628-637.score: 12.0
    In Essays Critical and Clinical, Deleuze argues that Beckettian characters usually strive towards becoming imperceptible. This statement immediately poses another question: what is becoming imperceptible and where does it lead? How can we rid ourselves of ourselves? Paradoxically enough, Deleuze states that becoming imperceptible is life. The literal and self-evident meaning of life seems somehow incompatible with the image of dissolving and decaying characters in Beckett's works. Contrary to this self-evidence, the notion of life in Deleuze and Beckett (...)
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  38. Tom Cooper (1995). A Conference Report Worth Reading: A Report Review by Tom Cooper. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):188 – 190.score: 12.0
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  39. Don E. Marietta Jr (1980). World Views and Moral Decisions: A Reply to Tom Regan. Environmental Ethics 2 (4):369-371.score: 12.0
    Tom Regan (this issue) criticizes my thesis that obligation toward the environment is grounded in a world view and thereby has a moral overridingness which mere interests and desires do not have. He holds that my approach is too subjectivistic. I counter, first, by explaining that phenomenology, which I use in my analysis of moral obligation, is not subjectivistic in the way emotivism or prescriptivism inethics is subjectivistic. Second, I argue that world views are products of learning and experience of (...)
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  40. Colin Gardner (2012). Beyond Percept and Affect: Beckett's Film and Non-Human Becoming. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):589-600.score: 12.0
    Film, Samuel Beckett's 1964 short starring Buster Keaton, dubbed by Deleuze as ‘The Greatest Irish Film’, is a seminal text in the latter's cinematic canon as it helps us to extrapolate the transition from the Bergson-based movement-image of Cinema 1 to the Nietzschean time-image of Cinema 2. Film is unique insofar as its narrative traverses and progressively destroys the action-, perception- and affection-images that constitute the movement-image as a whole, using Keaton's body, and more importantly his face, as a (...)
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  41. S. E. Gontarski (2012). Creative Involution: Bergson, Beckett, Deleuze. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):601-613.score: 12.0
    ‘Creative Involution’ posits something of a philosophical genealogy, a line of flight that has neither need for nor interest in the periodisation of Modernism, a line of which Beckett (even reluctantly) is part. Murphy, among others, is deterritorialised as much as Beckett's landscapes are, and so he/they become a ‘complexification’ of being that manifests itself in Beckett not as represented, representative or a representation, since so much of Beckett deals with that which cannot be uttered, known (...)
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  42. Alan Scott (2012). A Desperate Comedy: Hope and Alienation in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (4):448-460.score: 12.0
    This article is both a personal response to Samuel Beckett?s Waiting for Godot and an examination of the concept within literature of making the strange familiar and making the familiar strange. It discusses the educative force and potential of Beckett?s strangers in a strange world by examining my own personal experiences with the play. At the same time the limitations of Beckett?s theatre are explored through the contrast with the work of Berthold Brecht, who sought to make (...)
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  43. Gary Banham (2002). Cinders: Derrida with Beckett. In Richard J. Lane (ed.), Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave. 55--67.score: 12.0
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  44. Tom L. Beauchamp (1994). Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
     
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  45. Richard Begam (2002). Beckett and Postfoundationalism, or How Fundamental Are Those Fundamental Sounds? In Richard J. Lane (ed.), Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave. 11--39.score: 12.0
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  46. Richard Begam (2002). Beckett and Postfoundationalism. In Richard J. Lane (ed.), Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave.score: 12.0
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  47. Mary Bryden & Margaret Topping (eds.) (2009). Beckett's Proust/Deleuze's Proust. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
    This book is an encounter between Deleuze the philosopher, Proust the novelist, and Beckett the writer creating interdisciplinary and inter-aesthetic bridges between them, covering textual, visual, sonic and performative phenomena, including provocative speculation about how Proust might have responded to Deleuze and Beckett.
     
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  48. Mary Bryden (2002). Deleuze Reading Beckett. In Richard J. Lane (ed.), Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave. 80--92.score: 12.0
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  49. Mary Bryilen (2002). Deleuze Reading Beckett. In Richard J. Lane (ed.), Beckett and Philosophy. Palgrave. 80.score: 12.0
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  50. Mary Bryden (2009). The Embarrassment of Meeting : Burroughs, Beckett, Proust (and Deleuze). In Mary Bryden & Margaret Topping (eds.), Beckett's Proust/Deleuze's Proust. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
     
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