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  1. Tom Koch (2013). The Ethicist as Language Czar, or Cop: “End of Life” V. “Ending Life”. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (4):345-359.
    Bioethics promises a considered, unprejudicial approach to areas of medical decision-making. It does this, in theory, from the perspective of moral philosophy. But the promise of fairly considered, insightful commentary fails when word choices used in ethical arguments are prejudicial, foreclosing rather than opening an area of moral discourse. The problem is illustrated through an analysis of the language of The Royal Society Expert Panel Report: End of Life Decision Making advocating medical termination.
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  2. Tom Koch (2013). The Hippocratic Thorn in Bioethics' Hide: Cults, Sects, and Strangeness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (1):jht056.
    Bioethicists have typically disdained where they did not simply ignore the Hippocratic tradition in medicine. Its exclusivity—an oath of and for physicians—seemed contrary to the perspective that bioethicists have attempted to invoke. Robert M. Veatch recently articulated this rejection of the Hippocratic tradition, and of a professional ethic of medicine in general, in a volume based on his Gifford lectures. Here that argument is critiqued. The strengths of the Hippocratic tradition as a flexible and ethical social doctrine are offered in (...)
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  3. Tom Koch (2012). Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine. Mit Press.
    Bioethics claimed to offer a set of generally applicable, universally accepted guidelines that would simplify complex situations. In Thieves of Virtue, Tom Koch argues that bioethics has failed to deliver on its promises.
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  4. Tom Koch (2011). Care, Compassion, or Cost: Redefining the Basis of Treatment in Ethics and Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):130-139.
    There are in two assumptions inherent in this issue's theme, both inimical to the traditional goals of medicine and to the standards of care it proposed. First, the idea that treatment must be limited for some (but not others) on the basis of cost was born in the early literature of bioethics. Second, that there is a quantifiable and diagnostically predictable period at the “end-of-life” where treatment is “futile,” and therefore not worth supporting in a context of scarcity grew out (...)
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  5. Tom Koch (2006). Bioethics as Ideology: Conditional and Unconditional Values. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (3):251 – 267.
    For all its apparent debate bioethical discourse is in fact very narrow. The discussion that occurs is typically within limited parameters, rarely fundamental. Nor does it accommodate divergent perspectives with ease. The reason lies in its ideology and the political and economic perspectives that ideology promotes. Here the ideology of bioethics' fundamental axioms is critiqued as arbitrary and exclusive rather than necessary and inclusive. The result unpacks the ideological and political underpinnings of bioethical thinking and suggests new avenues for a (...)
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  6. Tom Koch (2004). The Difference That Difference Makes: Bioethics and the Challenge of "Disability". Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):697 – 716.
    Two rival paradigms permeate bioethics. One generally favors eugenics, euthanasia, assisted suicide and other methods for those with severely restricting physical and cognitive attributes. The other typically opposes these and favors instead ample support for "persons of difference" and their caring families or loved ones. In an attempt to understand the relation between these two paradigms, this article analyzes a publicly reported debate between proponents of both paradigms, bioethicist Peter Singer and lawyer Harriet McBryde Johnson. At issue, the article concludes, (...)
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  7. Tom Koch (2003). Remembering David Thomasma. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (02):187-191.
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  8. Tom Koch (2001). Physician-Assisted Death for the Terminally Ill. Hastings Center Report 31 (3):4.
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  9. Tom Koch & Ken Denike (2001). Equality Vs. Efficiency: The Geography of Solid Organ Distribution in the Usa. Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):45 – 56.
    There is at present a divide in the geographical literature between those interested in distributive justice as a social value and those who seek to implement distributive plans on the basis of efficiency of resource use. The former are 'social geographers' interested in equity as a social value, and the latter are 'practical' economic and locational geographers. This divide mirrors one existing elsewhere in social science between Rawlsian liberalism and utilitarian planners. Here we argue that equality and efficiency are related (...)
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  10. Tom Koch, Kathryn Braun & James H. Pietsch (2000). Response to “Difference and the Delivery of Healthcare” (Special Section) (CQ Vol 7, No 1). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (01):123-127.
    In a special issue of this journal, a range of authors addressed the critical problem of difference in bioethics. To what extent do class, culture, ethnicity, and race affect the ethical decisions that patients and professionals must make in a medical context? Those arguing for an understanding of cultural influences in bioethical decisionmakingtypically argue from the perspective of individual case studies to demonstrate the importance of these social constructs. Others, like Erika Blacksher, however, worry that this approach will obscure the (...)
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  11. Tom Koch (1999). Does the “Sanctity of Human Life” Doctrine Sanctify Humanness, or Life? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (04):557-560.
    No single principle is more critical to our ethical stance than the one asserting the sanctity of human life. In debates ranging from the care of anencephalic infants to the maintenance of fragile seniors, the question is, Where are the boundaries of sanctified human life? The generally accepted assumption is that a once firm set of principles and definitions is now eroding in the face of There is no doubt,that the miracles of medical technology have brought up ethical issues not (...)
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  12. Tom Koch & Mark Ridgley (1999). Consensus in Medical Decision Making: Analyzing the Environment of Discourse Ethics. Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):201 – 217.
    In recent years geographic interest has focused increasingly on the moral and ethical dimensions of social constructions. Much of this work has followed the direction taken by moral philosophers whose principled approach has been applied to a range of ethically or morally problematic contexts. The challenge has been to apply a geographic perspective to an ethical dilemma that seems intractable at the level of ethical principle. This paper uses a geographic perspective to consider in a concrete fashion a current bioethical (...)
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  13. Tom Koch & Mary Rowell (1999). The Dream of Consensus: Finding Common Ground in a Bioethical Context. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (3):261-273.
    Consensus is the holy grail of bioethics, the lynch pin of the assumption that well informed, well intentioned people may reach generally acceptable positions on ethically contentious issues. It has been especially important in bioethics, where advancing technology has assured an increasing field of complex medical dilemmas. This paper results on the use of a multicriterion decision making system (MCDM) analyzing group process in an attempt to better define hospital policy. In a pilot program at The Hospital for Sick Children, (...)
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  14. Tom Koch & Mary Rowell (1999). Response to Special Section: Cloning: Technology, Policy, and Ethics (CQ Vol 7, No 2). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):241-245.
    A recent issue of CambridgeQuarterlyofHealthcareEthics provides a fascinating look into the uncertainties surrounding the subject of human cloning. As Nelkin and Lindee point out, for example, the popular assumption is that this technology will lead to individual immortality. life everlasting for the deserving.considers the use of cloning for the replication of human individuals to be ethically unacceptable.”.
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  15. Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.
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  16. Tom Koch (1998). The Limits of Principle: Deciding Who Lives and What Dies. Praeger.
     
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  17. Tom Koch (1998). On the Subject(s) of Jack Kevorkian, M.D.: A Retrospective Analysis. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):436-441.
    To those defining euthanasia as a battle for the principle of self-determination, persons seeking physician assisted death (PAD) are soldiers in the fight for patient autonomy. The reasons they seek it, or the potential of other, non-life-threatening interventions is less important than this principle: individuals have the right not only to choose death (suicide), but to be assisted in dying. They should not be second guessed or denied on the basis of another's distaste for that decision. This paper offers a (...)
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  18. Tom Koch & Mark Ridgley (1998). Distanced Perspectives: Aids, Anencephaly, and Ahp. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):47-58.
    US court decisions guaranteeing life-sustaining care to anencephalic infants have been viewed with disfavor, and sometimes disbelief, by some ethicists who do not believe in the necessity of life-sustaining support for those without cognitive abilities or an independently sustainable future. The distance between these two views – one legal and inclusive, the other medical and specific – seems unbridgeable. This paper reports on a program using multicriterion decision making to define and describe persons in a way which both acknowledges the (...)
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  19. Tom Koch (1997). Principles and Purpose: The Patient Surrogate's Perspective and Role. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (04):461-.
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  20. Tom Koch (1996). Normative and Prescriptive Criteria: The Efficacy of Organ Transplantation Allocation Protocols. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    Normative criteria adopted to assure just, equitable, and efficient allocation of donor organs to potential recipients has been widely praised as a model for the allocation of scarce medical resources. Because the organ transplantation program relies upon voluntary participation by potential donors, all such programs necessarily rely upon public confidence in allocation decision making protocols. Several well publicized cases have raised questions in North America about the efficacy of allocation procedures. An analysis of those cases, and the relevant technical literature, (...)
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  21. Tom Koch (1996). Living Versus Dying “With Dignity”: A New Perspective on the Euthanasia Debate. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (01):50-.
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  22. Tom Koch (1996). The Canadian Question: What's So Great About Intelligence? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (02):307-.
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  23. Tom Koch (1995). The Gulf Between; Surrogate Choices Physician Instructions, and Informal Network Respones. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (02):185-.
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