1. Linsey Raymaekers, Tom Smeets, Maarten Jv Peters, Henry Otgaar & Harald Merckelbach (2012). The Classification of Recovered Memories: A Cautionary Note. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1640-1643.
    Traditionally, recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse have been classified as those emerging spontaneously versus those surfacing during the course of suggestive therapy. There are indications that reinterpretation of memories might be a third route to recovered memories. Thus, recovered memories do not form a homogeneous category. Nevertheless, the conceptual distinctions between the various types of recovered memories remain difficult for researchers and clinicians. With this in mind, the current study explored whether recovered memories can be reliably classified. We found (...)
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  2. Linsey Raymaekers, Maarten J. V. Peters, Tom Smeets, Latifa Abidi & Harald Merckelbach (2011). Underestimation of Prior Remembering and Susceptibility to False Memories: Two Sides of the Same Coin? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1144-1153.
    In two studies, we explored whether susceptibility to false memories and the underestimation of prior memories tap overlapping memory phenomena. Study 1 investigated this issue by administering the Deese/Roediger–McDermott task and the forgot-it-all-along task to an undergraduate sample . It was furthermore explored how performances on these tasks correlate with clinically relevant traits such as fantasy proneness, dissociative experiences, and cognitive efficiency. Results show that FIA and DRM performances are relatively independent from each other, suggesting that these measures empirically apparently (...)
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  3. Henry Otgaar, Ewout H. Meijer, Timo Giesbrecht, Tom Smeets, Ingrid Candel & Harald Merckelbach (2010). Children's Suggestion-Induced Omission Errors Are Not Caused by Memory Erasure. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):265-269.
    We explored whether children’s suggestion-induced omission errors are caused by memory erasure. Seventy-five children were instructed to remove three pieces of clothing from a puppet. Next, they were confronted with evidence falsely suggesting that one of the items had not been removed. During two subsequent interviews separated by one week, children had to report which pieces of clothing they had removed. Children who during both interviews failed to report that they had removed the pertinent item completed a choice reaction time (...)
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