91 found
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  1.  11
    Tom Sorell & Heather Draper (2012). Telecare, Surveillance, and the Welfare State. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):36-44.
    In Europe, telecare is the use of remote monitoring technology to enable vulnerable people to live independently in their own homes. The technology includes electronic tags and sensors that transmit information about the user's location and patterns of behavior in the user's home to an external hub, where it can trigger an intervention in an emergency. Telecare users in the United Kingdom sometimes report their unease about being monitored by a ?Big Brother,? and the same kind of electronic tags that (...)
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  2. Tom Sorell & Heather Draper (2014). Robot Carers, Ethics, and Older People. Ethics and Information Technology 16 (3):183-195.
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  3.  41
    Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.) (2005). Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy written in English is overwhelmingly analytic philosophy, and the techniques and predilections of analytic philosophy are not only unhistorical but anti-historical, and hostile to textual commentary. Analytic usually aspires to a very high degree of clarity and precision of formulation and argument, and it often seeks to be informed by, and consistent with, current natural science. In an earlier era, analytic philosophy aimed at agreement with ordinary linguistic intuitions or common sense beliefs, or both. All of these aspects of (...)
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  4.  50
    Tom Sorell (1991). Scientism: Philosophy and the Infatuation with Science. Routledge.
    SCIENTISM AND 'SCIENTIFIC EMPIRICISM' WHAT IS SCIENTISM? Scientism is the belief that science, especially natural science, is much the most valuable part of ...
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  5.  17
    Heather Draper & Tom Sorell (2013). Telecare, Remote Monitoring and Care. Bioethics 27 (7):365-372.
    Telecare is often regarded as a win/win solution to the growing problem of meeting the care needs of an ageing population. In this paper we call attention to some of the ways in which telecare is not a win/win solution but rather aggravates many of the long-standing ethical tensions that surround the care of the elderly. It may reduce the call on carers' time and energy by automating some aspects of care, particularly daily monitoring. This can release carers for other (...)
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  6. Tom Sorell (1994). Business Ethics. Butterworth-Heinemann.
     
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  7.  10
    Tom Sorell (2003). II-Morality and Emergency. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):21-37.
    Agents sometimes feel free to resort to underhand or brutal measures in coping with an emergency. Because emergencies seem to relax moral inhibitions as well as carrying the risk of great loss of life or injury, it may seem morally urgent to prevent them or curtail them as far as possible. I discuss some cases of private emergency that go against this suggestion. Prevention seems morally urgent primarily in the case of public emergencies. But these are the responsibility of defensibly (...)
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  8.  12
    Tom Sorell (1992). Reviews : Robert B. Pippin, Modernism as a Philosophical Problem. Oxford: Blackwell, 1991. £35.00, Paper £11.95, Viii + 218 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 5 (4):75-81.
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  9.  76
    Heather Draper & Tom Sorell (2002). Patients' Responsibilities in Medical Ethics. Bioethics 16 (4):335–352.
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  10.  5
    Tom Sorell (2011). Preventive Policing, Surveillance, and European Counter-Terrorism. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (1):1-22.
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  11.  21
    Tom Sorell (ed.) (1993). The Rise of Modern Philosophy: The Tension Between the New and Traditional Philosophies From Machiavelli to Leibniz. Oxford University Press.
    "Modern" philosophy in the West is said to have begun with Bacon and Descartes. Their methodological and metaphysical writings, in conjunction with the discoveries that marked the seventeenth-century scientific revolution, are supposed to have interred both Aristotelian and scholastic science and the philosophy that supported it. But did the new or "modern" philosophy effect a complete break with what preceded it? Were Bacon and Descartes untainted by scholastic influences? The theme of this book is that the new and traditional philosophies (...)
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  12.  5
    Tom Sorell (2000). Moral Theory and Anomaly. Blackwell Publishers.
    This volume is essential reading to anyone working in contemporary ethics and moral philosophy.
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  13. Tom Sorell (2005). Descartes Reinvented. Cambridge University Press.
    In this study, Tom Sorell seeks to rehabilitate views that are often instantly dismissed in analytic philosophy. His book serves as a reinterpretation of Cartesianism and responds directly to the dislike of Descartes in contemporary philosophy. To identify what is defensible in Cartesianism, Sorell starts with a picture of unreconstructed Cartesianism, which is characterized as realistic, antisceptical but respectful of scepticism, rationalist, centered on the first person, dualist, and dubious of the comprehensiveness of natural science and its supposed independence of (...)
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  14.  25
    Tom Sorell (2011). The Limits of Principlism and Recourse to Theory: The Example of Telecare. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):369-382.
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  15.  4
    Nicholas Oakley & Tom Sorell (2012). Medical Repatriation: The Need for a Bigger Picture. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):8-9.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 8-9, September 2012.
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  16. G. A. J. Rogers, Tom Sorell & Jill Kraye (eds.) (2010). Insiders and Outsiders in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Routledge.
    Seventeenth-century philosophy scholars come together in this volume to address the Insiders--Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, and Hobbes--and Outsiders--Pierre Gassendi, Kenelm Digby, Theophilus Gale, Ralph Cudworth and Nicholas Malebranche--of the philosocial canon, and the ways in which reputations are created and confirmed. In their own day, these ten figures were all considered to be thinkers of substantial repute, and it took some time for the Insiders to come to be regarded as major and original philosophers. Today these Insiders all feature in (...)
     
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  17.  34
    Tom Sorell (2002). Two Ideals and the Death Penalty. Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (2):27-35.
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  18.  1
    Tom Sorell (2016). Law and Equity in Hobbes. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (1):29-46.
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  19.  22
    Tom Sorell (2002). Morality and Emergency. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):21–37.
    Agents sometimes feel free to resort to underhand or brutal measures in coping with an emergency. Because emergencies seem to relax moral inhibitions as well as carrying the risk of great loss of life or injury, it may seem morally urgent to prevent them or curtail them as far as possible. I discuss some cases of private emergency that go against this suggestion. Prevention seems morally urgent primarily in the case of public emergencies. But these are the responsibility of defensibly (...)
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  20.  20
    Roger Ariew, John Cottingham & Tom Sorell (eds.) (1998). Descartes' Meditations: Background Source Materials. Cambridge University Press.
    No single text could be considered more important in the history of philosophy than Descartes' Meditations. This unique collection of background material to this magisterial philosophical text has been translated from the original French and Latin. The texts gathered here illustrate the kinds of principles, assumptions, and philosophical methods that were commonplace when Descartes was growing up. The selections are from: Francisco Sanches, Christopher Clavius, Pierre de la Ramee (Petrus Ramus), Francisco Suárez, Pierre Charron, Eustachius a Sancto Paulo, Scipion Dupleix, (...)
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  21.  3
    Tom Sorell (2001). Hobbes and the Morality Beyond Justice. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 82 (3‐4):227-242.
  22. Tom Sorell (1986/1999). Hobbes. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
     
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  23. Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.) (2005). Analytic Philosophy and the History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Philosophy written in English is overwhelmingly analytic philosophy, and the techniques and predilections of analytic philosophy are not only unhistorical but anti-historical, and hostile to textual commentary. Analytic usually aspires to a very high degree of clarity and precision of formulation and argument, and it often seeks to be informed by, and consistent with, current natural science. In an earlier era, analytic philosophy aimed at agreement with ordinary linguistic intuitions or common sense beliefs, or both. All of these aspects of (...)
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  24.  20
    Tom Sorell (1994). The Customer is Not Always Right. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (11):913 - 918.
    Consumers can sustain markets that are morally questionable. They can make immoral or morally suspect demands of individual businesses, especially small businesses. Even when they do not, the costs to firms of consumer protection can sometimes drive them to ruin. This paper presents cases where deference to the consumer is variously unwarranted, cases that may prompt second thoughts about some kinds of consumerism.
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  25. Tom Sorell (2000). Discussion: The Good of Theory: A Reply to Kaler. Business Ethics: A European Review 9 (1):51-57.
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  26.  41
    Tom Sorell (2002). Review: Human Nature and the Limits of Science. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (444):855-860.
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  27. Tom Sorell (2007). Parental Choice and Expert Knowledge in the Debate About MMR and Autism. In Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (eds.), Ethics, Prevention, and Public Health. Clarendon Press
     
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  28. Tom Sorell Ltd & Tom Sorell (eds.) (1998). Health Care, Ethics and Insurance. Routledge.
    This volume is an exploration of the ethical issues raised by health insurance, which is particularly timely in the light of recent advances in medical research and political economy. Focusing on a wide range of areas, such as AIDS, genetic engineering, screening and underwriting, new disability legislation and the ethics of private and public health insurance, this comprehensive and sometimes controversial book provides an essential survey of the key issues in health insurance. Divided into two parts, the first considers (...)
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  29. Tom Sorell (1987). Kant's Good Will and Our Good Nature. Second Thoughts About Henson and Herman. Kant-Studien 78 (1):87-101.
  30.  8
    Tom Sorell (ed.) (1996). The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press.
    It was as a political thinker that Thomas Hobbes first came to prominence, and it is as a political theorist that he is most studied today. Yet the range of his writings extends well beyond morals and politics. Hobbes had distinctive views in metaphysics and epistemology, and wrote about such subjects as history, law, and religion. He also produced full-scale treatises in physics, optics, and geometry. All of these areas are covered in this Companion, most in considerable detail. The volume (...)
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  31.  10
    Tom Sorell (1988). Descartes, Hobbes and The Body of Natural Science. The Monist 71 (4):515-525.
  32.  3
    Tom Sorell (1996). 2 Hobbes's Scheme of the Sciences. In The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press 45.
  33.  2
    Tom Sorell (1995). Hobbes's Objections and Hobbes's System. In Roger Ariew & Marjorie Glicksman Grene (eds.), Descartes and His Contemporaries: Meditations, Objections, and Replies. University of Chicago Press 83--96.
  34.  25
    Tom Sorell (1993). Aggravated Murder and Capital Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):201-213.
    It is possible to defend the death penalty for aggravated murder in more than one way, and not every defence is equally compelling. The paper takes up arguments put forward by two very distinguished advocates of the death penalty, Mill and Kant. After reviewing Mill's argument and some weaknesses in it, I shall sketch another line of reasoning that combines his conclusion with premisses to be found in Kant. The hybrid argument provides at least the basis for a sound defence (...)
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  35.  15
    Tom Sorell (1981). Harman's Paradox. Mind 90 (360):557-575.
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  36.  7
    Tom Sorell, Florence Perronin & Luc Foisneau (2006). L'état de nature de Hobbes dans la philosophie anglo-saxonne contemporaine : Gauthier, Hampton et Gray. Les Etudes Philosophiques 4 (4):461-474.
    Les usages que fait Hobbes de l’état de nature sont souvent mal compris par les philosophes anglo-américains contemporains, y compris par des commentateurs distingués comme Gauthier et Hampton. À la différence de Gauthier, je soutiens que Hobbes ne se soucie nullement de naturaliser le fondement de la motivation morale, et je conteste l’interprétation de Hampton qui considère que le contractualisme hobbesien a plus de pertinence pour nous aujourd’hui que le contractualisme kantien. Il existe certes des liens entre une juste interprétation (...)
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  37.  8
    Tom Sorell (2013). Power and Surveillance. The Philosophers' Magazine 63:65-71.
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  38. Tom Sorell (1987). Hobbes. Mind 96 (383):427-429.
     
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  39.  14
    Tom Sorell (2006). Hobbes on Trade, Consumption and International Order. The Monist 89 (2):245-258.
  40.  1
    Tom Sorell (1987). Descartes. New York ;Oxford University Press.
    Rene Descartes had a remarkably short working life, yet his contribution to philosophy and physics have endured to this day. He is perhaps best known for his statement, "Cogito, ergo sum," the cornerstone of his metaphysics. Descartes did not intend the metaphysics to stand apart from his scientific work, which included important investigations into physics, mathematics, and optics. In this book, Sorell shows that Descarates was, above all, an advocate and practitioner of the new mathematical approach to physics, and that (...)
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  41.  12
    Tom Sorell (1987/2000). Descartes: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Rene Descartes had a remarkably short working life, yet his contribution to philosophy and physics have endured to this day. He is perhaps best known for his statement, "Cogito, ergo sum," the cornerstone of his metaphysics. Descartes did not intend the metaphysics to stand apart from his scientific work, which included important investigations into physics, mathematics, and optics. In this book, Sorell shows that Descarates was, above all, an advocate and practitioner of the new mathematical approach to physics, and that (...)
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  42.  14
    Tom Sorell (1993). Virtues and Rights: The Moral Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes. Philosophical Books 34 (1):12-14.
  43.  10
    Tom Sorell (1991). Self, Society and Kantian Impersonality. The Monist 74 (1):30-42.
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  44. Tom Sorell (1992). Art, Society and Morality. In Oswald Hanfling (ed.), Philosophical Aesthetics: An Introduction. Open University 297--347.
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  45.  1
    Tom Sorell (2004). The Normative and the Explanatory in Hobbes's Political Philosophy. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 1.
    The Normative and the Explanatory in Hobbes's Political Philosophy - ABSTRACT: Tom Sorell modifies an interpretation he presented in his Hobbes . He continues to maintain that Hobbesian natural philosophy and Hobbesian civil philosophy are methodologically quite distinct, as well as distinct in subject-matter. But it is misleading to put this by saying that civil philosophy is normative and natural philosophy is explanatory, as if civil philosophy itself weren’t supposed to be explanatory. Civil philosophy can be explanatory in the sense (...)
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  46.  2
    Tom Sorell (2002). Armchair Applied Philosophy and Business Ethics. In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge 1--181.
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  47.  13
    Tom Sorell (2008). Descartes and the Passionate Mind - by Deborah J. Brown. Philosophical Books 49 (1):47-48.
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  48.  3
    Tom Sorell (2002). Human Nature and the Limits of Science. Mind 111 (444):855-860.
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  49.  7
    Tom Sorell (1990). Hobbes's UnAristotelian Political Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 23 (2):96 - 108.
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  50.  8
    Tom Sorell (2000). Discussion: The Good of Theory: A Reply to Kaler. Business Ethics 9 (1):51–57.
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