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  1. Tom Tillemans (forthcoming). Dharmakīrti. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Tom J. F. Tillemans (2013). "How Do Mādhyamikas Think?" Revisited. Philosophy East and West 63 (3):417-425.
    In an article published in 2009 titled "How Do Mādhyamikas Think?" I tried to go some distance with Yasuo Deguchi, Jay Garfield, and Graham Priest (henceforth "DGP") in reading certain Buddhist texts as dialetheist.1 The dialetheism that I saw as plausible for the Prajñāpāramitā-sūtras and Nāgārjuna was not the full-blown robust variety of DGP (i.e., acceptance of the truth of some statement of the form p & ¬p) but a non-adjunctive variety, acceptance of p and acceptance of ¬p. In short, (...)
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  3. Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.) (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. One (...)
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  5. Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.) (2009). Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  6. Jay L. Garfield, Tom J. F. Tillemans & Mario D'Amato, eds (2009). Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. OUP USA.
    This volume collects essays by philosophers and scholars working at the interface of Western philosophy and Buddhist Studies. Many have distinguished scholarly records in Western philosophy, with expertise in analytic philosophy and logic, as well as deep interest in Buddhist philosophy. Others have distinguished scholarly records in Buddhist Studies with strong interests in analytic philosophy and logic. All are committed to the enterprise of cross-cultural philosophy and to bringing the insights and techniques of each tradition to bear in order to (...)
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  7. Tom J. F. Tillemans (2009). How Do Madhyamikas Think? Notes on Jay Garfield, Graham Priest, and Paraconsistency. In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Tom J. F. Tillemans (2008). Introduction: Buddhist Argumentation. [REVIEW] Argumentation 22 (1):1-14.
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  9. Tom J. F. Tillemans (2008). Reason, Irrationality and Akrasia (Weakness of the Will) in Buddhism: Reflections Upon Śāntideva's Arguments with Himself. [REVIEW] Argumentation 22 (1):149-163.
    Let it be granted that Buddhism has, e.g., in its logical literature, detailed canons and explicit rules of right reason that, amongst other things, ban inconsistency as irrational. This is the normative dimension of how people should think according to many major Buddhist authors. But do important Buddhist writers ever recognize any interesting or substantive role for inconsistency and forms of irrationality in their account of how people actually do think and act? The article takes as its point of departure (...)
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  10. Tom Tillemans (2004). What Are Mādhyamikas Refuting? Śāntarakṣita, Kamalaśīla Et Alii on Superimpositions (Samāropa). In Musashi Tachikawa, Shoun Hino & Toshihiro Wada (eds.), Three Mountains and Seven Rivers: Prof. Musashi Tachikawa's Felicitation Volume. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 225--237.
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  11. Tom J. F. Tillemans & Donald S. Lopez (1998). What Can One Reasonably Say About Nonexistence? A Tibetan Work on the Problem of Āśrayāsiddha. Journal of Indian Philosophy 26 (2):99-129.
  12. Tom J. F. Tillemans (1995). Dharmakīrti and Tibetans Onad $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{R} $}}{R} " />Śyānupalabdhihetu. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (2).
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  13. Tom J. F. Tillemans (1995). DharmakĪrti and Tibetans onAd Underset{Raise0.3emhbox{ Śyānupalabdhihetu. Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (2):129-149.
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  14. Tom J. F. Tillemans (1990). On Sapak $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{s}$}}{s} " />A. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (1).
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  15. Tom J. F. Tillemans (1990). On Sapak\ underset {\ raise0. 3em\ hbox {a. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (1):53-79.
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  16. TomJF Tillemans (1990). On Sapak $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{s}$$ a. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (1):53-79.
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  17. Tom J. F. Tillemans (1989). Formal and Semantic Aspects of Tibetan Buddhist Debate Logic. Journal of Indian Philosophy 17 (3):265-297.
  18. Tom J. F. Tillemans (1984). Two Tibetan Texts on the “Neither One nor Many” Argument for Śūnyatā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 12 (4):357-388.