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  1. Tony Lynch & A. R. J. Fisher (2012). Pure Hypocrisy. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):32-43.
    We argue that two mam accounts of hypocrisy— the deception-based and the moral-non-seriousness-based account—fail to capture a specific kind of hypocrite who is morally serious and sincere "all the way down." The kind of hypocrisy exemplified by this hypocrite is irreducible to deception, self-deception or a lack of moral seriousness. We call this elusive and peculiar kind of hypocrisy, pure hypocrisy. We articulate the characteristics of pure hypocrisy and describe the moral psychology of two kinds of pure hypocrites.
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  2. Tony Lynch (2011). What Plato Can Teach Us About Politics and Freedom. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (1):75-89.
    We have built our understanding of politics (the understanding that is today, letting us down) on a one-sided understanding of freedom as the ability or capacity to do as we wish, and have forgotten the role that self-discipline—self-control and self-mastery—have in ensuring real freedom. And we have done this at the same time as losing our capacity to think of polhics in terms of the virtues and vices of our ruling elites. To rectify these connected failures we need to look (...)
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  3. Tony Lynch (2010). Deliberating From One's Virtues. Philosophy 85 (2):259-272.
    Bernard Williams says that 'the characteristic and basic expression of a moral disposition in deliberation is not a premise which refers to that disposition'. If this means that we can never properly self-ascribe virtues and deliberate from this, then Williams is wrong. To deny this possibility is to be committed to either of two positions, neither of which is all that attractive (and certainly not attractive to Williams). The first position demands that virtue cannot know itself; while the second rests (...)
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  4. Tony Lynch (2009). Legitimating Market Egoism: The Availability Problem. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):89 - 95.
    It is a common enough view that market agents are self-interested, not benevolent or altruistic – call this market egoism – and that this is morally defensible, even morally required. There are two styles of defence – utilitarian and deontological – and while they differ, they confront a common problem. This is the availability problem. The problem is that the more successful the moral justification of self-interested economic activity, the less there is for the justification to draw upon. Religious justifications (...)
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  5. Tony Lynch & Adrian Walsh (2003). The Mandevillean Conceit and the Profit-Motive. Philosophy 78 (1):43-63.
    Invisible Hand accounts of the operations of the competitive market are often thought to have two implications for morality as it confronts economic life. First, explanantions of agents economic activities eschew constitutive appeal to moral notions; and second, such moralism is pernicious insofar as it tends to undermine the operations of a socially valuable social process. This is the Mandevillean Conceit. The Conceit rests on an avarice-only reading of the profit-motive that is mistaken. The avarice-only reading is not the only (...)
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  6. Adrian Walsh & Tony Lynch (2003). The Development of Price Formation Theory and Subjectivism About Ultimate Values. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (3):263–278.
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  7. Tony Lynch (2002). The Very Idea of Justice in Pricing. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 21 (3/4):3-25.
  8. Tony Lynch (2001). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (4):572 – 574.
    Book Information A Common Humanity: Thinking about <span class='Hi'>Love</span> and Truth and Justice. A Common Humanity: Thinking about <span class='Hi'>Love</span> and Truth and Justice Raimond Gaita London Routledge 2000 xxxi, 293 Hardback £17.99 By Raimond Gaita. Routledge. London. Pp. xxxi, 293. Hardback:£17.99.
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  9. Tony Lynch (2001). Temperance, Temptation, and Silence. Philosophy 76 (2):251-269.
    Often a concern for truthfulness becomes the celebration of radical truthfulness, where this involves both the utter refusal of deception and that all moral and political beliefs be fit to survive publicity. An unfortunate consequence of this is that it has blinded us to a fair and accurate understanding of the nature and role of an important technique of virtue—temperance. Temperance implies a strategy of renunciation and withdrawal from the full content of our psychological lives. It involves us in pursuing (...)
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  10. Tony Lynch & David Wells (2001). Insuring the Future. Environmental Values 10 (4):507 - 521.
    Environmental politics needs more than piecemeal institutional efforts and more than calls for a set of 'new' values. It needs a realistic, comprehensive, and effective policy programme. Such a programme can be derived from a conjunction of Hardin's work on the 'tragedy of the commons' and Beck's analysis of the 'risk society', and involves exploiting the possibilities for the internalisation of risk provided by the insurance and reinsurance industries. Such exploitation requires tailored changes to the politico-legal environment, enforcing strict liability (...)
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  11. Tony Lynch & A. J. Walsh (2000). The Good Mercenary? Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (2):133–153.
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  12. Tony Lynch & David Wells (1998). Back From Beyond. Environmental Values 7 (2):193 - 197.
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  13. Tony Lynch & David Wells (1998). Non-Anthropocentrism? A Killing Objection. Environmental Values 7 (2):151 - 163.
    To take the idea of a non-anthropocentric ethic of nature seriously is to abandon morality itself. The idea of humanity is not an optional extra for moral seriousness. Non-anthropocentric environmental ethicists mistake the kind of value non-human entities may bear. It is not moral value, but aesthetic value.
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  14. Tony Lynch (1996). Deep Ecology as an Aesthetic Movement. Environmental Values 5 (2):147 - 160.
    Many deep ecologists call for a 'new ecological ethic'. If this ethic is meant to be a moral ethic, then deep ecology fails. However if deep ecology is interpreted as an aesthetic movement, then it is both philosophically coherent and practically adequate.
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  15. Tony Lynch (1993). Skepticism About Education. Educational Theory 43 (4):391-409.
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