Search results for 'Torstein Theodor Tollefsen' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Torstein Theodor Tollefsen (2012). Activity and Participation in Late Antique and Early Christian Thought. OUP Oxford.score: 1770.0
    Activity and Participation in Late Antique and Early Christian Thought is an investigation into two basic concepts of ancient pagan and Christian thought. The study examines how activity in Christian thought is connected with the topic of participation: for the lower levels of being to participate in the higher means to receive the divine activity into their own ontological constitution. Torstein Theodor Tollefsen sets a detailed discussion of the work of church fathers Gregory of Nyssa, Dionysius the (...)
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  2. Torstein Tollefsen (2008). The Christocentric Cosmology of St Maximus the Confessor. OUP Oxford.score: 480.0
    St. Maximus the Confessor (580-662), was a major Byzantine thinker, a theologian and philosopher. He developed a philosophical theology in which the doctrine of God, creation, the cosmic order, and salvation is integrated in a unified conception of reality. Christ, the divine Logos, is the centre of the principles (the logoi ) according to which the cosmos is created, and in accordance with which it shall convert to its divine source. -/- Torstein Tollefsen treats Maximus' thought from a (...)
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  3. Deborah Perron Tollefsen (2009). WIKIPEDIA and the Epistemology of Testimony. Episteme 6 (1):8-24.score: 60.0
    In “Group Testimony” (2007) I argued that the testimony of a group cannot be understood (or at least cannot always be understood) in a summative fashion; as the testimony of some or all of the group members. In some cases, it is the group itself that testifies. I also argued that one could extend standard reductionist accounts of the justification of testimonial belief to the case of testimonial belief formed on the basis of group testimony. In this paper, I explore (...)
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  4. Deborah Tollefsen, Collective Intentionality. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
  5. Deborah Perron Tollefsen (2003). Participant Reactive Attitudes and Collective Responsibility. Philosophical Explorations 6 (3):218 – 234.score: 30.0
    The debate surrounding the issue of collective moral responsibility is often steeped in metaphysical issues of agency and personhood. I suggest that we can approach the metaphysical problems surrounding the issue of collective responsibility in a roundabout manner. My approach is reminiscent of that taken by P.F. Strawson in "Freedom and Resentment" (1968). Strawson argues that the participant reactive attitudes - attitudes like resentment, gratitude, forgiveness and so on - provide the justification for holding individuals morally responsible. I argue that (...)
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  6. Deborah Tollefsen (2007). Group Testimony. Social Epistemology 21 (3):299 – 311.score: 30.0
    The fact that much of our knowledge is gained through the testimony of others challenges a certain form of epistemic individualism. We are clearly not autonomous knowers. But the discussion surrounding testimony has maintained a commitment to what I have elsewhere called epistemic agent individualism. Both the reductionist and the anti-reductionist have focused their attention on the testimony of individuals. But groups, too, are sources of testimony - or so I shall argue. If groups can be testifiers, a natural question (...)
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  7. Christopher Tollefsen (2006). Reasons for Action and Reasons for Belief. Social Epistemology 20 (1):55 – 65.score: 30.0
    As Alan Wood has recently pointed out, there is "a long and strong philosophical traditionthat parcels out cognitive tasks to human faculties in such a way that belief is assigned to the will".1 Such an approach lends itself to addressing the ethics of belief as an extension of practical ethics. It also lends itself to a treatment of reasons for belief that is an extension of its treatment of reasons for action, for our awareness of reasons for action provides the (...)
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  8. Deborah Perron Tollefsen (2002). Collective Intentionality and the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):25-50.score: 30.0
    In everyday discourse and in the context of social scientific research we often attribute intentional states to groups. Contemporary approaches to group intentionality have either dismissed these attributions as metaphorical or provided an analysis of our attributions in terms of the intentional states of individuals in the group.Insection1, the author argues that these approaches are problematic. In sections 2 and 3, the author defends the view that certain groups are literally intentional agents. In section 4, the author argues that there (...)
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  9. Deborah Tollefsen (2005). Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.score: 30.0
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
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  10. Deborah Tollefsen (2002). Organizations as True Believers. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):395–410.score: 30.0
  11. Deborah Tollefsen (1999). Princess Elisabeth and the Problem of Mind-Body Interaction. Hypatia 14 (3):59-77.score: 30.0
    : This paper focuses on Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia's philosophical views as exhibited in her early correspondence with René Descartes. Elisabeth's criticisms of Descartes's interactionism as well as her solution to the problem of mind-body interaction are examined in detail. The aim here is to develop a richer picture of Elisabeth as a philosophical thinker and to dispel the myth that she is simply a Cartesian muse.
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  12. Deborah Tollefsen (2006). The Rationality of Collective Guilt. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):222–239.score: 30.0
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  13. Christopher Tollefsen (2006). Is a Purely First Person Account of Human Action Defensible? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (4):441 - 460.score: 30.0
    There are two perspectives available from which to understand an agent's intention in acting. The first is the perspective of the acting agent: what did she take to be her end, and the means necessary to achieve that end? The other is a third person perspective that is attentive to causal or conceptual relations: was some causal outcome of the agent's action sufficiently close, or so conceptually related, to what the agent did that it should be considered part of her (...)
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  14. Deborah Perron Tollefsen (2008). Review of Daniel D. Hutto, Folk Psychological Narratives: The Sociocultural Basis of Understanding Reasons. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).score: 30.0
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  15. Christopher Tollefsen (2008). Biomedical Research and Beyond: Expanding the Ethics of Inquiry. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Biomedical Research and Beyond: Expanding the Ethics of Inquiry investigates the ethics of biomedical and scientific inquiry, including embryonic research, animal research, genetic enhancement, and fairness in research in the developing world. Core concerns of biomedical and scientific research ethics are then shown also to be key in humanistic areas of inquiry. Biomedical Research and Beyond concludes with a discussion of the virtues that all inquirers, scientific, medical, and humanistic, should possess.
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  16. Deborah Perron Tollefsen (2006). Group Deliberation, Social Cohesion, and Scientific Teamwork: Is There Room for Dissent? Episteme 3 (1-2):37-51.score: 30.0
    Recent discussions of rational deliberation in science present us with two extremes: unbounded optimism and sober pessimism. Helen Longino (1990) sees rational deliberation as the foundation of scientific objectivity. Miriam Solomon (1991) thinks it is overrated. Indeed, she has recently argued (2006) that group deliberation is detrimental to empirical success because it often involves groupthink and the suppression of dissent. But we need not embrace either extreme. To determine the value of rational deliberation we need to look more closely at (...)
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  17. Christopher Tollefsen (2003). Experience Machines, Dreams, and What Matters. Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):153-164.score: 30.0
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  18. Christopher Tollefsen (2001). Embryos, Individuals, and Persons: An Argument Against Embryo Creation and Research. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (1):65–78.score: 30.0
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  19. Christopher Tollefsen (2002). Practical Reason and Ethics Above the Line. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):67-87.score: 30.0
    In John McDowell's recent Woodbridge Lectures at Columbia University, he characterizes Wilfrid Sellars's master thought, in Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind, as drawing a line between two types of characterizations of states that occur in people's mental lives: Above the line are placings in the logical space of reasons, and below it are characterizations that do not do that (McDowell, 1998, p. 433). In this essay, I ask what would be required for ethics to be above the line. More (...)
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  20. Deborah Tollefsen (2004). Collective Rationality and Collective Reasoning, Christopher McMahon. Cambridge University Press 2001, VII + 251 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):409-416.score: 30.0
  21. Christopher Tollefsen (2009). Poverty, Justice, and Western Political Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 151-152.score: 30.0
  22. Chris Tollefsen (2007). Ethics in Medicine – Jennifer Jackson. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):148–151.score: 30.0
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  23. Christopher Tollefsen (2000). What Would John Dewey Do? The Promises and Perils of Pragmatic Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (1):77 – 106.score: 30.0
    Recent work done at the intersection of classical American pragmatism and bioethics promises much: a clarified self-understanding for bioethics, a modus vivendi for progress, and liberation from misguided and misguiding theories and principles. The revival of pragmatism outside bioethics in the past twenty years, however, has been of a distinctly anti-realist orientation. Richard Rorty, for example, has urged that there is no objective truth or good for philosophy to be concerned with. I ask whether the work in Pragmatic Bioethics follows (...)
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  24. Christopher Tollefsen (2004). Introduction: On the Edges of Informed Consent. HEC Forum 16 (1):1-5.score: 30.0
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  25. Christopher Tollefsen (1999). Sidgwickian Objectivity and Ordinary Morality. Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (1):57-70.score: 30.0
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  26. Chris Tollefsen (2008). Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief – John Bishop. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (233):758-762.score: 30.0
  27. Christopher Tollefsen (2006). The President's Council on Bioethics: Overview and Assessment. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 18 (2):99-107.score: 30.0
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  28. Christopher Tollefsen & Mark J. Cherry (2003). Pragmatism and Bioethics: Diagnosis or Cure? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (5 & 6):533 – 544.score: 30.0
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  29. Deborah Tollefsen (2003). Book Review. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (3):406-411.score: 30.0
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  30. Ithamar Theodor (2007). The Pariāma Aesthetics as Underlying the Bhāgavata Purāa. Asian Philosophy 17 (2):109 – 125.score: 30.0
    This paper offers a literary and ideological deconstruction of the Bhāgavata Purāa; it traces the Purāa's formation through the convergence of the Vedāntin, the Aesthetic and the Vaiava traditions, and argues that it is the doctrine of Pariāma which underlies the treatise. I first examine the Bhāgavata Purāa's literary components; the roots of these are traced back historically to the Vedānta and Ālvār traditions, and the Bhāgavata Purāa's nature as an opus universale, representing an all Indian cultural 'melting pot', is (...)
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  31. Jean Henrique Costa (2013). A atualidade da discussão sobre a indústria cultural em Theodor W. Adorno. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (2):135-154.score: 24.0
    Este ensaio vem problematizar acerca da atualidade do conceito de indústria cultural ( Kulturindustrie ), no projeto da teoria crítica de Theodor W. Adorno, objetivando mostrar que as atuais limitações impostas ao debate derivam mais do fundamento não-dialético dos que apontam sua restrição do que da própria potência da teorização frankfurtiana.
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  32. Sebastian Draiman (2010). Theodor Damian, Implicatiile spirituale ale teologiei icoanei/ Spiritual Implications of the Iconic Theology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (13):181-182.score: 24.0
    Theodor Damian, Implicatiile spirituale ale teologiei icoanei Ed. Eikon, Cluj, 2003.
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  33. Theodor Gomperz (1993). Theodor Gomperz: Eine Auswahl Herkulanischer Kleiner Schriften (1864-1909). E.J. Brill.score: 21.0
    Contains a collection of the essays of the great Viennese Hellenist Theodor Gomperz concerning the Herculanean Papyri of Epicurus and Philodemus.
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  34. Janice Richardson (1999). “A Burglar in the House of Philosophy”: Theodor Adorno and Drucilla Cornell and Hate Speech. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 7 (1):3-31.score: 21.0
  35. Deborah Tollefsen & Rick Dale (2011). Naturalizing Joint Action: A Process-Based Approach. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):385 - 407.score: 20.0
    Numerous philosophical theories of joint agency and its intentional structure have been developed in the past few decades. These theories have offered accounts of joint agency that appeal to higher-level states (such as goals, commitments, and intentions) that are ?shared? in some way. These accounts have enhanced our understanding of joint agency, yet there are a number of lower-level cognitive phenomena involved in joint action that philosophers rarely acknowledge. In particular, empirical research in cognitive science has revealed that when individuals (...)
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  36. Olaf Tollefsen (1982). Realism, Conventionalism, and the History of Science. New Scholasticism 56 (3):292-305.score: 20.0
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  37. Sondra Bacharach & Deborah Tollefsen (2010). We Did It: From Mere Contributors to Coauthors. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):23-32.score: 20.0
  38. Sondra Bacharach & Deborah Tollefsen (2011). We Did It Again: A Reply to Livingston. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):225-230.score: 20.0
  39. Christopher Tollefsen (2012). Augustine, Aquinas, and the Absolute Norm Against Lying. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (1):111-134.score: 20.0
    Recent events concerning the guerilla journalism group Live Action created controversy over the morality of lying for a good cause. In that controversy, I defended the absolutist view about lying, the view that lying, understood as assertion contrary to one’s belief, is always wrong. In this essay, I step back from the specifics of the Live Action case to look more closely at what St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas, had to say in defense of the absolute view. Their approaches, (...)
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  40. Deborah Tollefsen (2004). Collective Epistemic Agency. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (1):55-66.score: 20.0
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  41. Ithamar Theodor (2010). Exploring the Bhagavad Gitā: Philosophy, Structure, and Meaning. Ashgate Pub..score: 20.0
    Introduction: Setting the scene -- The soul, Dharma, and liberation -- The supreme person's descent -- The path of enlightened action -- The path of classical yoga -- The vision of the supreme, I -- Quitting the body, the ephemeral, and eternal worlds -- The vision of the supreme, II -- Seeing the supreme in this world -- The revelation -- Stages of devotion -- The vision of the supreme in the heart -- The three Gusas -- The journey from (...)
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  42. Deborah P. Tollefsen, Rick Dale & Alexandra Paxton (2013). Alignment, Transactive Memory, and Collective Cognitive Systems. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):49-64.score: 20.0
    Research on linguistic interaction suggests that two or more individuals can sometimes form adaptive and cohesive systems. We describe an “alignment system” as a loosely interconnected set of cognitive processes that facilitate social interactions. As a dynamic, multi-component system, it is responsive to higher-level cognitive states such as shared beliefs and intentions (those involving collective intentionality) but can also give rise to such shared cognitive states via bottom-up processes. As an example of putative group cognition we turn to transactive memory (...)
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  43. Christopher Tollefsen (2006). Fission, Fusion, and the Simple View. Christian Bioethics 12 (3):255-263.score: 20.0
    In this essay, I defend three Simple Views concerning human beings. First, that the human embryo is, from the one-cell stage onwards, a single unitary organism. Second, that when an embryo twins, it ceases to exist and two new embryos come into existence. And third, that you and I are essentially human organisms. This cluster of views shows that it is not necessary to rely on co-location, or other obscure claims, in understanding human embryogenesis.
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  44. C. Tollefsen (2010). Incarnate Reason and the Embryo: A Response to Dabrock. Christian Bioethics 16 (2):177-186.score: 20.0
    “Incarnate reason” names, in Peter Dabrock's essay, both the task of utilizing natural reason in ethical and political discourse, and an answer to the ontological question about human persons, “What are we?” In this essay, I investigate the significance of this construal for questions about the metaphysical, moral, and political status of the human embryo.
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  45. Christopher Tollefsen (2011). Some Questions for Philosophical Embryology. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):447-464.score: 20.0
    A philosophical embryology should have three concerns: first, it should describe the realities discovered by embryology and developmental biology ata higher level of generality than is achieved by those disciplines, and it should integrate this more general representation with philosophy’s other more generalconcepts. Second, it should answer philosophical questions raised by the study of embryological development if, as I believe, there are some. And third, it mustbe prepared to engage in a philosophical dialectic with those whose general representations work with (...)
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  46. Stanley Coren & Leonard H. Theodor (1975). Subjective Contour: The Inadequacy of Brightness Contrast as an Explanation. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (1):87-89.score: 20.0
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  47. Christopher Tollefsen (2011). Mind the Gap: Charting the Distance Between Christian and Secular Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 17 (1):47-53.score: 20.0
    The gap between Christian and secular bioethics appears to be widening, and inevitably so. In this essay, I identify four areas in which the differences between Christian and secular bioethics are significant, and in light of which secular bioethics, by its inability to attend to key concerns of Christian thought, will inevitably continue to marginalize the latter. How Christian bioethicists should view this marginalization will be the subject of the final section of this paper.
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  48. Christopher Tollefsen (1998). Response to “Reassessing the Reliability of Advance Directives” by Thomas May (CQ Vol. 6, No. 5) Advance Directives and Voluntary Slavery. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):405-413.score: 20.0
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  49. C. Tollefsen (1998). Meta Ain't Always Betta': Conceptualizing the Generic Chaplaincy Issue. Christian Bioethics 4 (3):305-315.score: 20.0
    Generic chaplaincy is the result of a devaluing of religious worship and belief to the merely instrumental and experiential. It is an expectable consequence of non-belief in the unique object that would render religious worship intrinsically meaningful and valuable. Generic chaplaincy has no place because all desire God, yet not all have found Him in the fullness with which He has revealed Himself to us, or even in the fullness with which we may be aware of Him through natural reason. (...)
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  50. C. Tollefsen (2008). Intending Damage to Basic Goods. Christian Bioethics 14 (3):272-282.score: 20.0
    Richard McCormick justified his move to proportionalism in part because of the perceived inadequacy of the Grisez-Finnis approach to morality to answer the following question: “What is to count for turning against a basic good, and why?” In this paper, I provide the beginnings of an account of what it means to intend damage to a good; I then show that the account is readily exportable to judgments regarding killing and lying defended by Grisez and others. I then indicate that (...)
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