Search results for 'Torture Prevention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. Bertrand, M. Ummel & T. -W. Harding (2002). Le comité européen pour la prévention de la torture : Comment la médecine et le droit peuvent se mettre au service des droits de l'homme. Médecine Et Droit 2002 (56):8-16.score: 120.0
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  2. Victor Nell (2006). Cruelty's Rewards: The Gratifications of Perpetrators and Spectators. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):211-224.score: 72.0
    Cruelty is the deliberate infliction of physical or psychological pain on other living creatures, sometimes indifferently, but often with delight. Though cruelty is an overwhelming presence in the world, there is no neurobiological or psychological explanation for its ubiquity and reward value. This target article attempts to provide such explanations by describing three stages in the development of cruelty. Stage 1 is the development of the predatory adaptation from the Palaeozoic to the ethology of predation in canids, felids, and primates. (...)
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  3. Subhradipta Sarkar, Archana Sarma, K. Mathiharan & Henri Tiphagne (eds.) (2006). Resource Materials for Doctors and Psychiatrists. People's Watch--Tamil Nadu.score: 60.0
     
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  4. Rita Maran (1990). The Juncture of Law and Morality in Prohibitions Against Torture. Journal of Value Inquiry 24 (4):285-300.score: 54.0
    The right to be secure from torture, a right that encompasses moral as well as legal strictures against the practice, is supported by increasingly stringent human rights instruments. In this essay, I have discussed the principal instruments and their place in the anti-torture field considered broadly. The phenomenon of these international instruments foreshadows an ever-widening range of legal initiatives against torture, and is emblematic of the increasing importance attached to respect for human life and human dignity. The (...)
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  5. Philipp Schmidinger (2010). Visiting Mechanisms to Eradicate Torture: A Foucaultian Analysis. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (3):317-355.score: 54.0
    In this Article, I examine the Visiting Mechanisms under the Convention against Torture (CAT) and the Optional Protocol thereto (OPCAT), applying an analytic approach resting on Foucault’s Discipline and Punish. I argue that international Visiting Mechanisms essentially constitute disciplinary apparatuses as depicted by Foucault. However, because they fail to recognise this functional similarity, they do not effectively apply the methods of inducing panoptic power. Most notably the concept of ‘hierarchical observation’ is hardly utilised at all. The two introduced legal (...)
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  6. Jessica Wolfendale (2009). Preventing Torture in Counterinsurgency and Counterterrorism Operations. In Paul Robinson, Nigel de Lee & Don Carrick (eds.), Ethics Education for Irregular War. Ashgate.score: 50.0
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  7. Paul Lauritzen (2010). Torture Warrants and Democratic States: Dirty Hands in an Age of Terror. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):93-112.score: 38.0
    In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, policy makers and others have debated the question of whether or not the United States should torture in an effort to prevent terrorist attacks. In a series of controversial essays, the legal theorist Alan Dershowitz argues that, if a democratic society is going to torture, it should at least be done under the cover of law. To that end, he recommends establishing a legal mechanism by which a judge could issue (...) warrants—much as they do now for search warrants. In this essay, I examine Dershowitz's proposal in light of Michael Walzer's classic essay on dirty hands. Just as Walzer uses political theater as a lens for viewing the issue of political assassination, I similarly draw upon a dramatic response to Dershowitz's proposal to think through the issue of torture warrants. (shrink)
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  8. Larry May (2005). Torturing Detainees During Interrogation. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):193-208.score: 34.0
    Despite the fact that torture of prisoners has been condemned by every major document in international law, it has seemed to some, especially those in the Bush Administration, that terrorism creates a special case for how prisoners are to be treated. The prisoner may belong to a “cell” of those who have committed themselves to the use of tactics that risk horrible consequences for many innocent people. The prisoner may have information about future attacks on civilian populations that could, (...)
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  9. Uwe Steinhoff (2006). Torture - the Case for Dirty Harry and Against Alan Dershowitz. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):337-353.score: 24.0
    Can torture be morally justified? I shall criticise arguments that have been adduced against torture and demonstrate that torture can be justified more easily than most philosophers dealing with the question are prepared to admit. It can be justified not only in ticking nuclear bomb cases but also in less spectacular ticking bomb cases and even in the socalled Dirty Harry cases. There is no morally relevant difference between self-defensive killing. of a culpable aggressor and torturing someone (...)
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  10. Andreas Maier (forthcoming). Torture. How Denying Moral Standing Violates Human Dignity. In Webster Elaine & Kaufmann Paulus (eds.), Violations of Human Dignity. Springer.score: 24.0
    In this article I try to elucidate the concept of human dignity by taking a closer look at the features of a paradigmatic torture situation. After identifying the salient aspects of torture, I discuss various accounts for the moral wrongness of such acts and argue that what makes torture a violation of human dignity is the perverted moral relationship between torturer and victim. This idea is subsequently being substantiated and defended against important objections. In the final part (...)
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  11. Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum (2009). Double Prevention and Powers. Journal of Critical Realism 8 (3):277-293.score: 24.0
    Does A cause B simply if A prevents what would have prevented B? Such a case is known as double prevention: where we have the prevention of a prevention. One theory of causation is that A causes B when B counterfactually depends on A and, as there is such a dependence, proponents of the view must rule that double prevention is causation.<br><br>However, if double prevention is causation, it means that causation can be an extrinsic matter, (...)
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  12. Bienke M. Janssen, Tine Van Regenmortel & Tineke A. Abma (2012). Balancing Risk Prevention and Health Promotion: Towards a Harmonizing Approach in Care for Older People in the Community. Health Care Analysis 22 (1):1-21.score: 24.0
    Many older people in western countries express a desire to live independently and stay in control of their lives for as long as possible in spite of the afflictions that may accompany old age. Consequently, older people require care at home and additional support. In some care situations, tension and ambiguity may arise between professionals and clients whose views on risk prevention or health promotion may differ. Following Antonovsky’s salutogenic framework, different perspectives between professionals and clients on the pathways (...)
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  13. Jean Maria Arrigo (2004). A Utilitarian Argument Against Torture Interrogation of Terrorists. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):543-572.score: 24.0
    Following the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, much support for torture interrogation of terrorists has emerged in the public forum, largely based on the “ticking bomb” scenario. Although deontological and virtue ethics provide incisive arguments against torture, they do not speak directly to scientists and government officials responsible for national security in a utilitarian framework. Drawing from criminology, organizational theory, social psychology, the historical record, and my interviews with military professionals, I assess the potential of (...)
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  14. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). Torture and the Military Profession. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    The military claims to be an honourable profession, yet military torture is widespread. Why is the military violating its own values? Jessica Wolfendale argues that the prevalence of military torture is linked to military training methods that cultivate the psychological dispositions connected to crimes of obedience. While these methods are used, the military has no credible claim to professional status. Combating torture requires that we radically rethink the nature of the military profession and military training.
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  15. Jesper Ryberg (2007). Privacy Rights, Crime Prevention, CCTV, and the Life of Mrs Aremac. Res Publica 13 (2):127-143.score: 24.0
    Over the past decade the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) as a means of crime prevention has reached unprecedented levels. Though critics of this development do not speak with one voice and have pointed to a number of different problems in the use of CCTV, one argument has played a dominant role in the debate, namely, that CCTV constitutes an unacceptable violation of people’s right to privacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine this argument critically. It (...)
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  16. Darrell Cole (2012). Torture and Just War. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):26-51.score: 24.0
    I offer an argument for why torture, as an act of state-sponsored force to gain information crucial to the well-being of the common good, should be considered as a tactic of war, and therefore scrutinized in terms of just war theory. I argue that, for those committed to the justifiability of the use of force, most of the popular arguments against all acts of torture are unpersuasive because the logic behind them would forbid equally any act of mutilating (...)
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  17. Claudia Card (2010). Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Concept of Evil: 1. Inexcusable wrongs; 2. Between good and evil; 3. Complicity in structural evils; 4. To whom (or to what?) can evils be done?; Part II. Terrorism, Torture, Genocide: 5. Counterterrorism; 6. Low-profile terrorism; 7. Conscientious torture?; 8. Ordinary torture; 9. Genocide is social death; 10. Genocide by forced impregnation; Bibliography; Filmography; Websites; Index.
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  18. Joseph-Matthew Mfutso-Bengo, Eva-Maria Mfutso-Bengo & Francis Masiye (2008). Ethical Aspects of Hiv/Aids Prevention Strategies and Control in Malawi. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (5):349-356.score: 24.0
    HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns have been overshadowed by conflicting, competing, and contradictory views between those who support condom use as a last resort and those who are against it for fear of promoting sexual immorality. We argue that abstinence and faithfulness to one partner are the best available moral solutions to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Of course, deontologists may argue that condom use might appear useful and effective in controlling HIV/AIDS; however, not everything that is useful is always good. In principle, (...)
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  19. Jonathan K. Crane (2011). PERSPECTIVES ON TORTURE: Reports From a Dialogue Including Christian, Judaic, Islamic, and Feminist Viewpoints. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):585-588.score: 24.0
    Torture continues to be a pressing political issue in North America, yet religious scholarly reflection on the ethics of torture remains all but sidelined in public discourse for a variety of complex reasons. These reasons are explored—and critiqued—in this collection of reflections by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and feminist religious ethicists. These scholars find that historical amnesia, forced if not twisted readings of classical texts and contemporary human rights instruments, and sociological factors are but a few of the factors (...)
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  20. Moran Yemini (2014). Conflictual Moralities, Ethical Torture: Revisiting the Problem of “Dirty Hands”. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):163-180.score: 24.0
    The problem of “dirty hands” has become an important term, indeed one of the most important terms of reference, in contemporary academic scholarship on the issue of torture. The aim of this essay is to offer a better understanding of this problem. Firstly, it is argued that the problem of “dirty hands” can play neither within rule-utilitarianism nor within absolutism. Still, however, the problem of “dirty hands” represents an acute, seemingly irresolvable, conflict within morality, with the moral agent understood, (...)
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  21. Lainie Friedman Ross (2003). The Ethics of Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (2):177-197.score: 24.0
    There are approximately one million cases oftype 1 diabetes in the US, and the incidenceis increasing worldwide. Given that two-thirdsof cases present in childhood, it is criticalthat prediction and prevention research involvechildren. In this article, I examine whethercurrent research methodologies conform to theethical guidelines enumerated by the NationalCommission for the Protection of Human Subjectsof Biomedical and Behavioral Research, andadopted into the federal regulations thatprotect research subjects. I then offer twopolicy recommendations to help researchersdesign studies that conform to these ethicalrequirements.
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  22. Sheldene Simola (2005). Concepts of Care in Organizational Crisis Prevention. Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):341 - 353.score: 24.0
    The role of ethics in organizational crisis management has received limited but growing attention. However, the majority of research has focused on applications of ethical theories to managing crisis events after they have occurred, as opposed to the implications of ethical theories for the primary prevention of these situations. The relationship between concepts derived from a contemporary ethic of care (resistance, voice, silence, connection) (Gilligan, C.: 1988, ‘Exit–voice Dilemmas in Adolescent Development’, in C. Gilligan, J. V. Ward and (...)
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  23. Rumee Ahmed (2011). The Lash is Mightier Than the Sword1: Torture and Citizenry in Medieval Muslim Jurisprudence. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):606-612.score: 24.0
    Medieval Muslim scholars unequivocally prohibited the torture of prisoners of war out of a concern for maintaining theoretical constructs about the boundaries of the Muslim and non-Muslim communities. Muslim scholars worried that the torturing prisoners of war would compromise values and ideals predicated on such constructs, and that the demands of citizenship trumped any benefit to the Muslim community that might accrue from torture.
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  24. Peter H. Schwartz (2009). Disclosure and Rationality: Comparative Risk Information and Decision-Making About Prevention. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (3):199-213.score: 24.0
    With the growing focus on prevention in medicine, studies of how to describe risk have become increasing important. Recently, some researchers have argued against giving patients “comparative risk information,” such as data about whether their baseline risk of developing a particular disease is above or below average. The concern is that giving patients this information will interfere with their consideration of more relevant data, such as the specific chance of getting the disease (the “personal risk”), the risk reduction the (...)
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  25. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Understanding Torture. Edinburgh University Press.score: 24.0
    Understanding Torture surveys the massive literature surrounding torture, arguing that, once properly understood, there can be no defence of torture in any circumstances.
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  26. Christine E. Gudorf (2011). Feminist Approaches to Religion and Torture. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):613-621.score: 24.0
    Feminists look critically at any infliction of pain on others, usually requiring that it be consensual, and often both consensual and for the benefit of the person afflicted. Most torture of women is not recognized under official definitions of torture because it is not performed by or with the consent of (government) officials. Women are, however, also victims of torture under official definitions as military or civilian prisoners or as members of defeated populations in war, and are (...)
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  27. Florian Ostmann & Carla Saenz (2013). Separate Goals, Converging Priorities: On the Ethics of Treatment as Prevention. Developing World Bioethics 13 (2):57-62.score: 24.0
    Recent evidence confirming that the administration of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to HIV-infected persons may effectively reduce their risk of transmission has revived the discussion about priority setting in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The fact that the very same drugs can be used both for treatment purposes and for preventive purposes (Treatment as Prevention) has been seen as paradigm-shifting and taken to spark a new controversy: In a context of scarce resources, should the allocation of ARVs be prioritized based on (...)
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  28. David P. Gushee (2011). The Contemporary U.S. Torture Debate in Christian Historical Perspective. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):589-597.score: 24.0
    The U.S. turn toward torture tested the moral resources of all faiths, but perhaps especially of Christianity, which has the greatest number of adherents in the United States. This moral crucible revealed that American Christian scholars and leaders were generally blind to the resources available in relation to the resources available to address torture in a study of scripture, early Christian experience under empire, Christian abuses of suspected heretics, and the just war theory, all of which are considered (...)
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  29. Bienke M. Janssen, Tine Regenmortel & Tineke A. Abma (2012). Balancing Risk Prevention and Health Promotion: Towards a Harmonizing Approach in Care for Older People in the Community. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (1):1-21.score: 24.0
    Many older people in western countries express a desire to live independently and stay in control of their lives for as long as possible in spite of the afflictions that may accompany old age. Consequently, older people require care at home and additional support. In some care situations, tension and ambiguity may arise between professionals and clients whose views on risk prevention or health promotion may differ. Following Antonovsky’s salutogenic framework, different perspectives between professionals and clients on the pathways (...)
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  30. Stuart Rennie (2013). Ethical Use of Antiretroviral Resources for HIV Prevention in Resource Poor Settings. Developing World Bioethics 13 (2):79-86.score: 24.0
    The effectiveness of antiretroviral regimes (ARVs) to reduce risk of HIV transmission from mother to child and as post-exposure prophylaxis has been known for almost two decades. Recent research indicates ARVs can also reduce the risk of HIV transmission via sexual intercourse in two other ways. With pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), ARVs are used to reduce risk of HIV acquisition among persons who are HIV negative and significantly exposed to the virus. With treatment as prevention (TasP), ARVs are used to (...)
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  31. Uwe Steinhoff (2013). On the Ethics of Torture. State University of New York Press.score: 24.0
    A detailed, clear, and comprehensive overview of the current philosophical debate on. The question of when, and under what circumstances, the practice of torture might be justified has received a great deal of attention in the last decade in both academia and in the popular media. Many of these discussions are, however, one-sided with other perspectives either ignored or quickly dismissed with minimal argument. In On the Ethics of Torture, Uwe Steinhoff provides a complete account of the philosophical (...)
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  32. Liza Dawson & Sheryl Zwerski (2014). Clinical Trial Design for HIV Prevention Research: Determining Standards of Prevention. Bioethics 28 (9):n/a-n/a.score: 24.0
    This article seeks to advance ethical dialogue on choosing standards of prevention in clinical trials testing improved biomedical prevention methods for HIV. The stakes in this area of research are high, given the continued high rates of infection in many countries and the budget limitations that have constrained efforts to expand treatment for all who are currently HIV-infected. New prevention methods are still needed; at the same time, some existing prevention and treatment interventions have been proven (...)
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  33. Bridget Haire & John M. Kaldor (2013). Ethics of ARV Based Prevention: Treatment‐as‐Prevention and PrEP. Developing World Bioethics 13 (2):63-69.score: 24.0
    Published data show that new HIV prevention strategies including treatment-as-prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using oral antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) are highly, but not completely, effective if regimens are taken as directed. Consequently, their implementation may challenge norms around HIV prevention. Specific concerns include the potential for ARV-based prevention to reframe responsibility, erode beneficial sexual norms and waste resources. This paper explores what rights claims uninfected people can make for access to ARVs for prevention, and whether (...)
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  34. Peter Miller (2011). Torture Approval in Comparative Perspective. Human Rights Review 12 (4):441-463.score: 24.0
    Torture is (almost) universally condemned as barbaric and ineffective, yet it persists in the modern world. What factors influence levels of support for torture? Public opinion data from 31 countries in 2006 and 2008 (a total of 44 country-years) are used to test three hypotheses related to the acceptability of torture. The findings, first, show that outright majorities in 31 country-years reject the use of torture. Multiple regression results show that countries with high per capita income (...)
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  35. John McMillan (forthcoming). The Kindest Cut? Surgical Castration, Sex Offenders and Coercive Offers. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101030.score: 24.0
    The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) have conducted visits and written reports criticising the surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany. They claim that surgical castration is degrading treatment and have called for an immediate end to this practice. The Czech and German governments have published rebuttals of these criticisms. The rebuttals cite evidence about clinical effectiveness and point out this is an intervention that (...)
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  36. Ruxandra Cesereanu (2010). An Overview of Political Torture in the Twentieth Century. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):120-143.score: 24.0
    The present essay focuses on political torture during the twentieth century. It takes a multidisciplinary approach, because it entails insights from history, politics, ideology, anthropology, psychology and literature. The aim of the present essay is to discuss the relation between "Classical" torture (in the past centuries) and "Modern" torture (in the twentieth century), analyzing the phenomena in a comparative perspective and paying attention to the hidden and unconscious motives behind historical facts. What I am interested in is (...)
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  37. Clare McGlynn (2008). Rape as 'Torture'? Catharine MacKinnon and Questions of Feminist Strategy. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):71-85.score: 24.0
    How can we eradicate violence against women? How, at least, can we reduce its prevalence? One possibility offered by Catharine MacKinnon is to harness international human rights norms, especially prohibitions on torture, and apply them to sexual violence with greater rigour and commitment than has hitherto been the case. This article focuses particularly on the argument that all rapes constitute torture in which states are actively complicit. It questions whether a feminist strategy to reconceptualise rape as torture (...)
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  38. A. R. Singh (2010). Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-Being and Longevity. Mens Sana Monographs 8 (1):17.score: 24.0
    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers etc, deserve (...)
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  39. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2003). Towards a Suicide Free Society: Identify Suicide Prevention as Public Health Policy. Mens Sana Monographs 1 (2):3.score: 24.0
    Suicide is amongst the top ten causes of death for all age groups in most countries of the world. It is the second most important cause of death in the younger age group (15-19 yrs.) , second only to vehicular accidents. Attempted suicides are ten times the successful suicide figures, and 1-2% attempted suicides become successful suicides every year. Male sex, widowhood, single or divorced marital status, addiction to alcohol ordrugs, concomitant chronic physical or mental illness, past suicidal attempt, adverse (...)
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  40. Jonathan K. Crane (2011). Torturous Ambivalence: Judaic Struggles with Torture. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):598-605.score: 24.0
    A surprising lack of consensus exists among contemporary Jewish scholars about Judaism's position vis-à-vis torture. Some claim that Judaism condones torture while others insist that Judaism condemns it. These diverging opinions on such a troubling practice suggest an ambivalence deep within the Judaic textual tradition about torturing bodies. This brief essay critiques both perspectives for twisting the textual tradition and offers some preliminary suggestions for a more robust Judaic approach to torture.
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  41. Johanna Hanefeld, Virginia Bond, Janet Seeley, Shelley Lees & Nicola Desmond (2013). Considerations for a Human Rights Impact Assessment of a Population Wide Treatment for HIV Prevention Intervention. Developing World Bioethics 14 (3).score: 24.0
    Increasing attention is being paid to the potential of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV prevention. The possibility of eliminating HIV from a population through a universal test and treat intervention, where all people within a population are tested for HIV and all positive people immediately initiated on ART, as part of a wider prevention intervention, was first proposed in 2009. Several clinical trials testing this idea are now in inception phase. An intervention which relies on universally testing the (...)
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  42. F. M. Kamm (ed.) (2011). Ethics for Enemies: Terror, Torture, and War. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Ethics for Enemies comprises three original philosophical essays on torture, terrorism, and war. F. M. Kamm deploys ethical theory in her challenging new treatments of these most controversial practical issues. First she considers the nature of torture and the various occasions on which it could occur, in order to determine why it might be wrong to torture a wrongdoer held captive, even if this were necessary to save his victims. In the second essay she considers what makes (...)
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  43. Norain A. Siddiqui, Murat Civaner & Omur Cinar Elci (2013). Physician Involvement in Torture: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (1):59-71.score: 24.0
    Evidence proves that physician involvement in torture is widely practiced in society. Despite its status as an illegal act as established by multiple international organizations, mandates are routinely unheeded and feebly enforced. Philosophies condemning and condoning torture are examined as well as physicians’ professional responsibilities and the manner in which such varying allegiances can be persuasive. Physician involvement in torture has proven detrimental to the core values of medicine and has tainted the field’s commitment to individuals’ health (...)
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  44. Holger Furtmayr & Andreas Frewer (2010). Documentation of Torture and the Istanbul Protocol: Applied Medical Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):279-286.score: 24.0
    The so-called Istanbul Protocol, a Manual on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and other Cruel, Inhumane or Degrading Treatment or Punishment was adopted by the United Nations soon after its completion in 1999 and since then has become an acknowledged standard for documenting cases of alleged torture and other forms of severe maltreatment. In 2009 the “Forum for medicine and human rights” at the Medical Faculty at the University Erlangen-Nuremburg has provided the first German edition of (...)
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  45. Audrey Marchioli & Didier Courbet (2010). Communication de santé publique et prévention du sida. Une expérimentation sur l'influence de mini-actes engageants via Internet. Hermes 58:169-174.score: 24.0
    During a qualitative survey we made among AIDS prevention campaigners in France, respondents stated in particular that they believed in the effectiveness of activities that prompt subjects to accomplish « mini-acts » before and after receiving persuasive arguments. As their opinion does not derive from scientific literature, we carried out an experiment, in an everyday environment with 196 subjects chosen at random and based on theories of persuasive communication and commitment, to investigate the validity of representations concerning these « (...)
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  46. Kristian Petrov (2013). The Art of Dying as an Art of Living: Historical Contemplations on the Paradoxes of Suicide and the Possibilities of Reflexive Suicide Prevention. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (3):347-368.score: 24.0
    The main aim of this paper is to reconstruct different aspects of the history of ideas of suicide, from antiquity to late modernity, and contemplate their dialectical tension. Reflexive suicide prevention, drawing on the ancient wisdom that the art of living is inseparable from the art of dying, takes advantage, it is argued, of the contradictory nature of suicide, and hence embraces, rather than trying to overcome, death, pain, grief, fear, hopelessness and milder depressions. This approach might facilitate the (...)
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  47. David Rodin (ed.) (2007). War, Torture and Terrorism: Ethics and War in the 21st Century. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    This collection by leading scholars represents state of the art writings on the ethics of war. Many of the most important and contested controversies in modern war receive comprehensive discussion: the practice of torture, terrorism, assassination and targeted killing, the bombing of civilians in war, humanitarian intervention, and the invasion of Iraq Analytical introduction provides a guide to recent developments in the ethics of war An excellent overview for general readers interested in the current debate and controversies over the (...)
     
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  48. Per-Anders Tengland (2010). Health Promotion and Disease Prevention: Logically Different Conceptions? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (4):323-341.score: 24.0
    The terms “health promotion” and “disease prevention” refer to professional activities. But a “health promoter” has also come to denote a profession, with an alternative agenda compared to that of traditional public health work, work that by some is seen to be too medically oriented, too reliant upon prevention, risk-elimination and health-care. But is there really a sharp distinction between these activities and professions? The main aim of the paper is to investigate if these concepts are logically different, (...)
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  49. Cécile Collinet & Schut (2014). L'articulation des temporalités dans les politiques de prévention du vieillissement. La prise en compte des activités physiques et sportives comme outil d'anticipation du bien vieillir. Temporalités 19.score: 24.0
    La prévention du vieillissement est au cœur des politiques publiques de la santé. De nombreux dispositifs sont ainsi proposés aux différentes échelles de l’action publique afin de promouvoir le vieillissement réussi ou le vieillissement actif ou encore le bien vieillir. Dans les plans et programmes, trois piliers semblent se dégager au cœur des mesures préventives pour la santé des personnes âgées : la nutrition, l’activité sociale et la pratique des activités physiques et sportives (APS).Notre intérêt se porte sur la politique (...)
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  50. Mary Dominick (2008). The US Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789, the US Torture Victims Protection Act of 1992, and the Gongadze Case: A Right Without Adequate Remedy? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (4):545-547.score: 24.0
    The US 1992 Torture Victims Protection Act (TVPA) strengthens the reach of the 1789 Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA) to US citizens alleging claims of torture and/or extrajudicial killings that occur abroad, but only if the plaintiffs were US citizens at the time of the criminal acts. Should the later-in-time statute, which gives effect to the United Nations Convention against Torture and extends remedies under the ATCA, be amended to apply to those given political asylum in this (...)
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