Search results for 'Torture ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Uwe Steinhoff (2013). On the Ethics of Torture. State University of New York Press.score: 72.0
    A detailed, clear, and comprehensive overview of the current philosophical debate on. The question of when, and under what circumstances, the practice of torture might be justified has received a great deal of attention in the last decade in both academia and in the popular media. Many of these discussions are, however, one-sided with other perspectives either ignored or quickly dismissed with minimal argument. In On the Ethics of Torture, Uwe Steinhoff provides a complete account of the (...)
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  2. F. M. Kamm (ed.) (2011). Ethics for Enemies: Terror, Torture, and War. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Ethics for Enemies comprises three original philosophical essays on torture, terrorism, and war. F. M. Kamm deploys ethical theory in her challenging new treatments of these most controversial practical issues. First she considers the nature of torture and the various occasions on which it could occur, in order to determine why it might be wrong to torture a wrongdoer held captive, even if this were necessary to save his victims. In the second essay she considers what (...)
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  3. David Rodin (ed.) (2007). War, Torture and Terrorism: Ethics and War in the 21st Century. Blackwell Pub..score: 60.0
    This collection by leading scholars represents state of the art writings on the ethics of war. Many of the most important and contested controversies in modern war receive comprehensive discussion: the practice of torture, terrorism, assassination and targeted killing, the bombing of civilians in war, humanitarian intervention, and the invasion of Iraq Analytical introduction provides a guide to recent developments in the ethics of war An excellent overview for general readers interested in the current debate and controversies (...)
     
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  4. Norain A. Siddiqui, Murat Civaner & Omur Cinar Elci (2013). Physician Involvement in Torture: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (1):59-71.score: 51.0
    Evidence proves that physician involvement in torture is widely practiced in society. Despite its status as an illegal act as established by multiple international organizations, mandates are routinely unheeded and feebly enforced. Philosophies condemning and condoning torture are examined as well as physicians’ professional responsibilities and the manner in which such varying allegiances can be persuasive. Physician involvement in torture has proven detrimental to the core values of medicine and has tainted the field’s commitment to individuals’ health (...)
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  5. Jean Maria Arrigo (2004). A Utilitarian Argument Against Torture Interrogation of Terrorists. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):543-572.score: 48.0
    Following the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, much support for torture interrogation of terrorists has emerged in the public forum, largely based on the “ticking bomb” scenario. Although deontological and virtue ethics provide incisive arguments against torture, they do not speak directly to scientists and government officials responsible for national security in a utilitarian framework. Drawing from criminology, organizational theory, social psychology, the historical record, and my interviews with military professionals, I assess the potential (...)
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  6. Jonathan K. Crane (2011). PERSPECTIVES ON TORTURE: Reports From a Dialogue Including Christian, Judaic, Islamic, and Feminist Viewpoints. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):585-588.score: 48.0
    Torture continues to be a pressing political issue in North America, yet religious scholarly reflection on the ethics of torture remains all but sidelined in public discourse for a variety of complex reasons. These reasons are explored—and critiqued—in this collection of reflections by Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and feminist religious ethicists. These scholars find that historical amnesia, forced if not twisted readings of classical texts and contemporary human rights instruments, and sociological factors are but a few of the (...)
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  7. Holger Furtmayr & Andreas Frewer (2010). Documentation of Torture and the Istanbul Protocol: Applied Medical Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):279-286.score: 48.0
    The so-called Istanbul Protocol, a Manual on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and other Cruel, Inhumane or Degrading Treatment or Punishment was adopted by the United Nations soon after its completion in 1999 and since then has become an acknowledged standard for documenting cases of alleged torture and other forms of severe maltreatment. In 2009 the “Forum for medicine and human rights” at the Medical Faculty at the University Erlangen-Nuremburg has provided the first German edition of (...)
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  8. R. S. Downie (1993). The Ethics of Medical Involvement in Torture. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):135-137.score: 45.0
    The difficulties of establishing a definition of torture are discussed, and a definition is suggested. It is then argued that, irrespective of general ethical questions, doctors in particular should never be involved because of their social role.
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  9. J. Jeremy Wisnewski (2010). Understanding Torture. Edinburgh University Press.score: 42.0
    Understanding Torture surveys the massive literature surrounding torture, arguing that, once properly understood, there can be no defence of torture in any circumstances.
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  10. R. M. Hare (1993). The Ethics of Medical Involvement in Torture: Commentary. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):138-141.score: 42.0
    Torture does need to be defined if we are to know exactly what we are seeking to ban; but no single definition will do, because there are many possible ones, and we may want to treat different practices that might be called torture differently. Compare the case of homicide; we do not want to punish manslaughter as severely as murder, and may not want to punish killing in self-defence at all. There are degrees of torture as of (...)
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  11. Paul Lauritzen (2010). Torture Warrants and Democratic States: Dirty Hands in an Age of Terror. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):93-112.score: 39.0
    In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, policy makers and others have debated the question of whether or not the United States should torture in an effort to prevent terrorist attacks. In a series of controversial essays, the legal theorist Alan Dershowitz argues that, if a democratic society is going to torture, it should at least be done under the cover of law. To that end, he recommends establishing a legal mechanism by which a judge could issue (...) warrants—much as they do now for search warrants. In this essay, I examine Dershowitz's proposal in light of Michael Walzer's classic essay on dirty hands. Just as Walzer uses political theater as a lens for viewing the issue of political assassination, I similarly draw upon a dramatic response to Dershowitz's proposal to think through the issue of torture warrants. (shrink)
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  12. Darrell Cole (2012). Torture and Just War. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):26-51.score: 39.0
    I offer an argument for why torture, as an act of state-sponsored force to gain information crucial to the well-being of the common good, should be considered as a tactic of war, and therefore scrutinized in terms of just war theory. I argue that, for those committed to the justifiability of the use of force, most of the popular arguments against all acts of torture are unpersuasive because the logic behind them would forbid equally any act of mutilating (...)
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  13. Chiara Lepora & Joseph Millum (2011). The Tortured Patient: A Medical Dilemma. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):38-47.score: 39.0
    Torture is unethical and usually counterproductive. It is prohibited by international and national laws. Yet it persists: according to Amnesty International, torture is widespread in more than a third of countries. Physicians and other medical professionals are frequently asked to assist with torture. -/- Medical complicity in torture, like other forms of involvement, is prohibited both by international law and by codes of professional ethics. However, when the victims of torture are also patients in (...)
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  14. D. Forrest (1996). Torture: Human Rights, Medical Ethics and the Case of Israel. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):251-252.score: 39.0
  15. Joseph Boyle (2012). Kamm , F. M. Ethics for Enemies: Terror, Torture, and War Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 178. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (4):819-824.score: 39.0
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  16. Edmund G. Howe (2002). Degloved Patients, Torture Victims, and" Bi-Phasic Ethics". Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (2):99.score: 39.0
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  17. J. Joseph Miller (2009). Aristotle, the Army, and Abu Ghraib : Torture and the Limits of Military Virtue Ethics. In Mark Evans (ed.), War, Terror, and Ethics. Nova Science Publishers, Inc..score: 39.0
  18. William O'Donohue, Cassandra Snipes, Georgia Dalto, Cyndy Soto, Alexandros Maragakis & Sungjin Im (2014). The Ethics of Enhanced Interrogations and Torture: A Reappraisal of the Argument. Ethics and Behavior 24 (2):109-125.score: 39.0
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  19. Philip R. Lee, Marcus Conant, Albert R. Jonsen & Steve Heilig (2006). Participation in Torture and Interrogation: An Inexcusable Breach of Medical Ethics—A Call to Hold Military Medical Personnel Accountable to Accepted Professional Standards. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (02):202-203.score: 39.0
  20. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). Torture and the Military Profession. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 36.0
    The military claims to be an honourable profession, yet military torture is widespread. Why is the military violating its own values? Jessica Wolfendale argues that the prevalence of military torture is linked to military training methods that cultivate the psychological dispositions connected to crimes of obedience. While these methods are used, the military has no credible claim to professional status. Combating torture requires that we radically rethink the nature of the military profession and military training.
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  21. Jessica Wolfendale (2012). J. Jeremy Wisnewski & R.D. Emerick, The Ethics of Torture (New York: Continuum, 2009), 164 Pages. ISBN: 9780826498908 (Pbk.). Hardback/Paperback: $120/19.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (1):137-139.score: 36.0
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  22. J. L. Arbor (1986). Animal Chauvinism, Plant-Regarding Ethics and the Torture of Trees. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (3):335 – 339.score: 36.0
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  23. Nathan Gorelick (2008). Imagining Extraordinary Renditions: Terror, Torture and the Possibility of an Excessive Ethics in Literature. Theory and Event 11 (2).score: 36.0
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  24. Idelber Avelar (2004). The Letter of Violence: Essays on Narrative, Ethics, and Politics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 36.0
    This book traces the theory of violence from nineteenth-century symmetrical warfare through today's warfare of electronics and unbalanced numbers. Surveying such luminaries as Walter Benjamin, Frantz Fanon, Hannah Arendt, Paul Virilio, and Jacques Derrida, Avelar also offers a discussion of theories of torture and confession, the work of Roman Polanski and Borges, and a meditation on the rise of the novel in Colombia.
     
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  25. J. Milburn Thompson (2008). Catholic Social Teaching And The Ethics Of Torture. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 17 (2):22-42.score: 36.0
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  26. J. Jeremy Wisnewski & R. D. Emerick (2009). The Ethics Of Torture. Continuum.score: 36.0
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  27. Luciano Floridi & J. W. Sanders (2001). Artificial Evil and the Foundation of Computer Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):55-66.score: 30.0
    Moral reasoning traditionally distinguishes two types of evil:moral (ME) and natural (NE). The standard view is that ME is theproduct of human agency and so includes phenomena such as war,torture and psychological cruelty; that NE is the product ofnonhuman agency, and so includes natural disasters such asearthquakes, floods, disease and famine; and finally, that morecomplex cases are appropriately analysed as a combination of MEand NE. Recently, as a result of developments in autonomousagents in cyberspace, a new class of interesting (...)
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  28. Gordon Pearson & Martin Parker (2001). The Relevance of Ancient Greeks to Modern Business? A Dialogue on Business and Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):341 - 353.score: 30.0
    What follows is a dialogue, in the Platonic sense, concerning the justifications for "business ethics" as a vehicle for asking questions about the values of modern business organisations. The protagonists are the authors, Gordon Pearson – a pragmatist and sceptic where business ethics is concerned – and Martin Parker – a sociologist and idealist who wishes to be able to ask ethical questions of business. By the end of the dialogue we come to no agreement on the necessity (...)
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  29. Rudolf Schuessler (2013). Violating Strict Deontological Constraints: Excuse or Pardon? Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-15.score: 30.0
    Deontologists often assume that ethical constraints hold ‘come what may’ but that violations of the constraints (such as violation of the torture prohibition) can be excused or pardoned. Vinit Haksar has argued for pardon as deontologically appropriate mitigation for the violation of deontological constraints. However, the reasons he adduces against excuse are inconclusive. In this paper, I show how complex the question of excuse versus pardon for deontological transgressions is. Liability for the development of character traits and the assumption (...)
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  30. David J. Rothman (2006). Trust is Not Enough: Bringing Human Rights to Medicine. New York Review Books.score: 30.0
    Addresses the issues at the heart of international medicine and social responsibility. A number of international declarations have proclaimed that health care is a fundamental human right. But if we accept this broad commitment, how should we concretely define the state’s responsibility for the health of its citizens? Although there is growing debate over this issue, there are few books for general readers that provide engaging accounts of critical incidents, practices, and ideas in the field of human rights, health care, (...)
     
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  31. David Luban (2007). Legal Ethics and Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.score: 27.0
    David Luban is one of the world's leading scholars of legal ethics. In this collection of his most significant papers from the past twenty-five years, he ranges over such topics as the moral psychology of organisational evil, the strengths and weaknesses of the adversary system, and jurisprudence from the lawyer's point of view. His discussion combines philosophical argument, legal analysis and many cases drawn from actual law practice, and he defends a theory of legal ethics that focuses on (...)
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  32. Andrew Perechocky (forthcoming). Los Torturadores Medicos: Medical Collusion With Human Rights Abuses in Argentina, 1976–1983. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.score: 27.0
    Medical collaboration with authoritarian regimes historically has served to facilitate the use of torture as a tool of repression and to justify atrocities with the language of public health. Because scholarship on medicalized killing and biomedicalist rhetoric and ideology is heavily focused on Nazi Germany, this article seeks to expand the discourse to include other periods in which medicalized torture occurred, specifically in Argentina from 1976 to 1983, when the country was ruled by the Proceso de Reorganización Nacional (...)
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  33. Fritz Allhoff (2006). Physician Involvement in Hostile Interrogations. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (04):392-402.score: 27.0
    In this paper, I have two main goals. First, I will argue that traditional medical values mandate, as opposed to forbid, at least minimal physician participation in hostile interrogations. Second, I will argue that traditional medical duties or responsibilities do not apply to medically-trained interrogators. In support of this conclusion, I will argue that medically-trained interrogators could simply choose not to enter into a patient-physician relationship. Recognizing that this argument might not be convincing, I will then propose three further arguments (...)
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  34. Michael Ignatieff (2004/2005). The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror. Edinburgh University Press.score: 27.0
    Must we fight terrorism with terror and torture with torture? Must we sacrifice civil liberty to protect public safety?In the age of terrorism Michael Ignatieff argues that we must not shrink from the use of violence. But its use - in a liberal democracy - must be measured. And we must not fool ourselves that whatever we do in the name of freedom and democracy is good. We may need to kill to fight the greater evil of terrorism, (...)
     
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  35. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2010). The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Introduction -- Value theory : the nature of the good life -- Epicurus letter to Menoeceus -- John Stuart Mill, Hedonism -- Aldous Huxley, Brave new world -- Robert Nozick, The experience machine -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Jean Kazez, Necessities -- Normative ethics : theories of right conduct -- J.J.C. Smart, Eextreme and restricted utilitarianism -- Immanuel Kant the good will & the categorical imperative -- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan -- Philippa Foot, Natural goodness -- Aristotle, (...)
     
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  36. Norman Abeles (2011). Ethics and the Interrogation of Prisoners: An Update. Ethics and Behavior 20 (3):243-249.score: 24.0
    The issue of interrogation of detainees has received much attention in the psychological literature and by the media. Some estimate that more than 300 articles have been published in psychological journals on this topic. This article reiterates the content of the Presidential Task Force on Psychological Ethics and National Security and provides a brief history and background. This is followed by a section on the torture of prisoners and the role of psychologists. It includes discussion of resolutions passed (...)
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  37. Stephen S. Bush (2011). The Ethics of Ecstasy: Georges Bataille and Amy Hollywood on Mysticism, Morality, and Violence. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (2):299-320.score: 24.0
    Georges Bataille agrees with numerous Christian mystics that there is ethical and religious value in meditating upon, and having ecstatic episodes in response to, imagery of violent death. For Christians, the crucified Christ is the focus of contemplative efforts. Bataille employs photographic imagery of a more-recent victim of torture and execution. In this essay, while engaging with Amy Hollywood's interpretation of Bataille in Sensible Ecstasy, I show that, unlike the Christian mystics who influence him, Bataille strives to divorce himself (...)
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  38. D. McCready (2007). When Is Torture Right? Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (3):383-398.score: 24.0
    Despite nearly universal condemnation, torture remains a tool for interrogation, intimidation, and punishing. Even many who abhor torture are willing to consider its use in extraordinary situations. Both the deontological absolute prohibition of torture and the consequentialist justification of torture are inadequate ethics to address the issue. Dershowitz, Walzer, and Elshtain, among others, have attempted to redress the problem with more finely-tuned approaches, of which Elshtain's rejection of justification in favor of grace and forgiveness appears (...)
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  39. S. H. Burges (1980). Doctors and Torture: The Police Surgeon. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):120-123.score: 24.0
    Much has been written by many distinguished persons about the philosophical, religious and ethical considerations of doctors and their involvement with torture. What follows will not have the erudition or authority of the likes of St Augustine, Mahatma Gandi, Schopenhauer or Thomas Paine. It represents the views of a very ordinary person; a presumption defended by the submission that many very ordinary persons have been, and will be, instruments for effecting, assisting or condoning the physical or mental anguish of (...)
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  40. Subhradipta Sarkar, Archana Sarma, K. Mathiharan & Henri Tiphagne (eds.) (2006). Resource Materials for Doctors and Psychiatrists. People's Watch--Tamil Nadu.score: 24.0
     
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  41. Peter Singer (2005). Ethics and Intuitions. Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):331 - 352.score: 21.0
    For millennia, philosophers have speculated about the origins of ethics. Recent research in evolutionary psychology and the neurosciences has shed light on that question. But this research also has normative significance. A standard way of arguing against a normative ethical theory is to show that in some circumstances the theory leads to judgments that are contrary to our common moral intuitions. If, however, these moral intuitions are the biological residue of our evolutionary history, it is not clear why we (...)
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  42. Christopher Cosans (2009). Does Milton Friedman Support a Vigorous Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):391 - 399.score: 21.0
    This paper explores the level of obligation called for by Milton Friedman’s classic essay “The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits.” Several scholars have argued that Friedman asserts that businesses have no or minimal social duties beyond compliance with the law. This paper argues that this reading of Friedman does not give adequate weight to some claims that he makes and to their logical extensions. Throughout his article, Friedman emphasizes the values of freedom, respect for law, and duty. (...)
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  43. Martha C. Nussbaum (1999). Virtue Ethics: A Misleading Category? [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 3 (3):163-201.score: 21.0
    Virtue ethics is standardly taught and discussed as a distinctive approach to the major questions of ethics, a third major position alongside Utilitarian and Kantian ethics. I argue that this taxonomy is a confusion. Both Utilitarianism and Kantianism contain treatments of virtue, so virtue ethics cannot possibly be a separate approach contrasted with those approaches. There are, to be sure, quite a few contemporary philosophical writers about virtue who are neither Utilitarians nor Kantians; many of these (...)
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  44. James H. Moor (2001). The Future of Computer Ethics: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet! [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):89-91.score: 21.0
    The computer revolution can beusefully divided into three stages, two ofwhich have already occurred: the introductionstage and the permeation stage. We have onlyrecently entered the third and most importantstage – the power stage – in which many ofthe most serious social, political, legal, andethical questions involving informationtechnology will present themselves on a largescale. The present article discusses severalreasons to believe that future developments ininformation technology will make computerethics more vibrant and more important thanever. Computer ethics is here to stay!
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  45. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.score: 21.0
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2) to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim cultures. The (...)
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  46. José Luis Bermúdez (2007). Thinking Without Words: An Overview for Animal Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (3):319 - 335.score: 21.0
    In Thinking without Words I develop a philosophical framework for treating some animals and human infants as genuine thinkers. This paper outlines the aspects of this account that are most relevant to those working in animal ethics. There is a range of different levels of cognitive sophistication in different animal species, in addition to limits to the types of thought available to non-linguistic creatures, and it may be important for animal ethicists to take this into account in exploring issues (...)
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  47. Mark S. Schwartz (2005). Universal Moral Values for Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):27 - 44.score: 21.0
    How can one establish if a corporate code of ethics is ethical in terms of its content? One important first step might be the establishment of core universal moral values by which corporate codes of ethics can be ethically constructed and evaluated. Following a review of normative research on corporate codes of ethics, a set of universal moral values is generated by considering three sources: (1) corporate codes of ethics; (2) global codes of ethics; and (...)
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  48. Dag G. Aasland (2004). On the Ethics Behind “Business Ethics”. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):3-8.score: 21.0
    Ethics in business and economics is often attacked for being too superficial. By elaborating the conclusions of two such critics of business ethics and welfare economics respectively, this article will draw the attention to the ethics behind these apparently well-intended, but not always convincing constructions, by help of the fundamental ethics of Emmanuel Levinas. To Levinas, responsibility is more basic than language, and thus also more basic than all social constructions. Co-operation relations in organizations, markets and (...)
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  49. Michelle R. Greenwood (2002). Ethics and HRM: A Review and Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):261 - 278.score: 21.0
    This paper reviews and develops the ethical analysis of human resource management (HRM). Initially, the ethical perspective of HRM is differentiated from the "mainstrea" and critical perspectives of HRM. To date, the ethical analysis of HRM has taken one of two forms: the application Kantian and utilitarian ethical theories to the gestalt of HRM, and the application of theories of justice and fairness to specific HRM practices. This paper is concerned with the former, the ethical analysis of HRM in its (...)
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  50. Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2008). Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657 - 666.score: 21.0
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility also fully mediated the (...)
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