Search results for 'Totalitarianism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Baehr (2010). Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    A study of Hannah Arendt's indictment of social science, approaches to totalitarianism (Bolshevism and National Socialism), and of the robust responses of her ...
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  2. Skaidra Trilupaityte (2007). Totalitarianism and the Problem of Soviet Art Evaluation: The Lithuanian Case. Studies in East European Thought 59 (4):261 - 280.score: 24.0
    By taking into account dissident/political and art historical interpretations of Soviet art, I analyze how polemics about totalitarianism in the West, which generally corresponded with Cold War debates and Eastern European dissident thought, shaped the post-Soviet evaluations of national artistic legacies. It is argued that the political relationship with the totalitarian past, like in many post-socialist areas where the immediate past was subjected to radical re-evaluation, affected Lithuanian artists’ and critics’ attitude towards local Soviet art. Because of an obvious (...)
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  3. Peter Baehr & Gordon C. Wells (2012). Debating Totalitarianism: An Exchange of Letters Between Hannah Arendt and Eric Voegelin. History and Theory 51 (3):364-380.score: 21.0
    In 1952, Waldemar Gurian, founding editor of The Review of Politics, commissioned Eric Voegelin, then a professor of political science at Louisiana State University, to review Hannah Arendt’s recently published The Origins of Totalitarianism . She was given the right to reply; Voegelin would furnish a concluding note. Preceding this dialogue, Voegelin wrote a letter to Arendt anticipating aspects of his review; she responded in kind. Arendt’s letter to Voegelin on totalitarianism, written in German, has never appeared in (...)
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  4. Gershon Weiler (1994). From Absolutism to Totalitarianism: Carl Schmitt on Thomas Hobbes. Hollowbrook Pub..score: 21.0
  5. Gerhard Besier, Katarzyna Stokłosa & Andrew C. Wisely (eds.) (2008). Totalitarianism and Liberty: Hannah Arendt in the 21st Century. Księgarnia Akademicka.score: 21.0
     
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  6. Sumner Mac Lean (1987). Man, God, and State: The Interrelationships of Myth, Religion, and Totalitarianism. Athabascan Academic Pub..score: 21.0
     
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  7. Marc De Kesel (2004). Act Without Denial: Slavoj Žižek on Totalitarianism, Revolution and Political Act. Studies in East European Thought 56 (4):299-334.score: 18.0
    iek's thinking departs from the Lacanian claim that we live in a symbolic order, not a real world, and that the Real is what we desire, but can never know or grasp. There is a fundamental virtuality of reality that points to the lie in every truth-claim, and there are two ways of dealing with this:repression and denial. An ideology, a system or a regime becomes totalitarian when it denies the virtual character of both its world and its subject (democracy (...)
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  8. Peter Baehr (2004). Of Politics and Social Science 'Totalitarianism' in the Dialogue of David Riesman and Hannah Arendt. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (2):191-217.score: 18.0
    During the late 1940s and early 1950s, David Riesman and Hannah Arendt were engaged in an animated discussion about the meaning and character of totalitarianism. Their disagreement reflected, in part, different experiences and dissonant intellectual backgrounds. Arendt abhorred the social sciences, finding them pretentious and obfuscating. Riesman, in contrast, abandoned a career in law to take up the sociological vocation, which he combined with his own heterodox brand of humanistic psychology. This article delineates the stakes of the Arendt Riesman (...)
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  9. Vicky Iakovou (2009). Totalitarianism as a Non-State On Hannah Arendt's Debt to Franz Neumann. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (4):429-447.score: 18.0
    The objective of this article is to show that Hannah Arendt’s understanding of totalitarianism is indebted to the analysis of National Socialism elaborated by Franz Neumann in Behemoth: The Structure and Practice of National Socialism . It is argued that Arendt adopted the central thesis of Neumann according to which Nazi Germany is a ‘non-state’ and that this thesis as well as its presuppositions are discernible in her overall approach, developed in The Origins of Totalitarianism.
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  10. Lucian W. Pye (2000). Traumatized Political Cultures: The After Effects of Totalitarianism in China and Russia. Japanese Journal of Political Science 1 (1):113-128.score: 18.0
    Developments in both China and Russia are a challenge to political science, and more particularly to theories of political culture. Both countries are engaged in profound processes of transition involving the abandonment of totalitarianism and the adoption of market-based economies. It is, however, far from clear what form their political systems will eventually take. They are currently following strikingly different paths. Are the differences a reflection of their distinctive cultures? Or, are the differences more structural, a manifestation of their (...)
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  11. Alfons Söllner (2004). Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism in its Original Context. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (2):219-238.score: 18.0
    The objective of this article is to contribute to an understanding of Hannah Arendt’s special place in present-day political theory by means of a contrast between her Origins of Totalitarianism and four important political science studies of National Socialism and totalitarianism, three written by authors who shared the status of involuntary emigrant with Arendt, that are offered as constituting the original context of her work. A critical appreciation of the seminal works by Ernst Fraenkel, Franz L. Neumann, Sigmund (...)
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  12. Peter Beilharz (2002). Modernity and Communism: Zygmunt Bauman and the Other Totalitarianism. Thesis Eleven 70 (1):88-99.score: 18.0
    Bauman's work can be understood as a critical theory, but its east European context needs to be established alongside the west European sensibilities of the Frankfurt School. The question of Soviet modernity and the status of the Polish experience of which Bauman was part need to be placed alongside the more famous critique of the Holocaust, which can be more readily aligned with Horkheimer and Adorno's views in Dialectic of Enlightenment. To this end, some of Bauman's essays and arguments on (...)
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  13. James Chappel (2011). The Catholic Origins of Totalitarianism Theory in Interwar Europe. Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):561-590.score: 18.0
    Totalitarianism theory was one of the ratifying principles of the Cold War, and remains an important component of contemporary political discourse. Its origins, however, are little understood. Although widely seen as a secular product of anticommunist socialism, it was originally a theological notion, rooted in the political theory of Catholic personalism. Specifically, totalitarianism theory was forged by Catholic intellectuals in the mid-1930s, responding to Carl Schmitt's turn to the in 1931. In this essay I explore the notion's formation (...)
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  14. Sigrid Meuschel (2000). Theories of Totalitarianism and Modern Dictatorships: A Tentative Approach. Thesis Eleven 61 (1):87-98.score: 18.0
    This essay discusses totalitarian theories with regard to their capacity to interpret in a normatively plausible way such different dictatorships as Nazism, Stalinism and post-Stalinism. In contrast to theoretical approaches which subsume all these regimes under a single concept (totalitarianism as total control), it argues in favor of discerning terror and ideology as main characteristics (totalitarianism as extermination). The focus on National Socialism and Stalinism needs further differentiation. Theories of bureaucratic structures and charismatic domination may help in distinguishing (...)
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  15. Peter Baehr (2010). China the Anomaly Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Maoist Regime. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (3):267-286.score: 18.0
    During the autumn of 1949, Hannah Arendt completed the manuscript of The Origins of Totalitarianism. On 1 October of the same year, the People’s Republic of China was founded under the leadership of Mao Zedong. This article documents Arendt’s claim in 1949 that the prospects of totalitarianism in China were ‘frighteningly good’, and yet her ambivalent judgment, on the eve of the Cultural Revolution, about the totalitarian character of the Maoist regime. Despite being the premier theorist of totalitarian (...)
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  16. Jeffrey Herf (2006). Narratives of Totalitarianism: Nazism's Anti-Semitic Propaganda During World War II and the Holocaust. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (135):32-60.score: 18.0
    In recent decades, historians have probed the kinds of narratives that they tell in constructing the past. In the process, we have devoted too little attention to the ways that historical actors themselves translate beliefs and ideologies into narratives of events, which themselves become causal factors of great importance. In this essay, and the longer work from which it is drawn, I examine this translation as it emerged in Nazi Germany's anti-Semitic propaganda campaigns during World War II and the Holocaust. (...)
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  17. Anson Rabinbach (2006). Moments of Totalitarianism. History and Theory 45 (1):72–100.score: 15.0
    Hope and Memory: Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Tzvetan Todorov; David Bellos The Dictators: Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia by Richard Overy Stalinism and Nazism: History and Memory Compared by Henry Rousso; Lucy B. Golsan Stalinism and Nazism: Dictatorships in Comparison by Ian Kershaw; Moshe Lewin Did Somebody Say Totalitarianism? Five Interventions in the use of a Notion by Slavoj Zizek.
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  18. Seyla Benhabib (2009). International Law and Human Plurality in the Shadow of Totalitarianism: Hannah Arendt and Raphael Lemkin. Constellations 16 (2):331-350.score: 15.0
  19. Roy T. Tsao (2002). The Three Phases of Arendt's Theory of Totalitarianism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):579-619.score: 15.0
  20. Anne-Marie Roviello (2007). The Hidden Violence of Totalitarianism: The Loss of the Groundwork of the World. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (3):923-930.score: 15.0
    In the Origins of Totalitarianism, Hannah Arendt makes the unexpected statement that totalitarian violence "is expressed much more frighteningly in the organization of its followers than in the physical liquidation of its opponents." Of course, her intention is not to deny the radical physical violence of totalitarianism but rather to understand the distinctive features of totalitarian terror. In order to fully understand the importance of what Arendt is describing, we should compare this first moment of the analysis with (...)
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  21. Roy T. Tsao (2007). Second Thoughts, New Beginnings: Notes on Arendt's Unmarked Itinerary From the Origins of Totalitarianism to the Human Condition. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (1):7-27.score: 15.0
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  22. Elisabeth Young-Bruehl (2002). On the Origins of a New Totalitarianism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):567-578.score: 15.0
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  23. Richard J. Bernstein (2002). The Origins of Totalitarianism: Not History, but Politics. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):381-401.score: 15.0
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  24. Jerome Kohn (2002). Arendt's Concept and Description of Totalitarianism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):621-656.score: 15.0
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  25. Peter Beilharz (1988). Reviews : Ferenc Feher and Agnes Heller, Eastern Left, Western Left : Totalitarianism, Freedom and Democracy (Polity, 1987). Thesis Eleven 20 (1):138-142.score: 15.0
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  26. Jacques Taminiaux (2002). The Philosophical Stakes in Arendt's Genealogy of Totalitarianism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):423-446.score: 15.0
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  27. Dana Villa (2011). Review Article: Arendt and Totalitarianism: Contexts of Interpretation Richard H. King and Dan Stone (Eds) Hannah Arendt and the Uses of History: Imperialism, Nation, Race, and Genocide. New York: Berghahn Books, 2007. Peter Baehr Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] European Journal of Political Theory 10 (2):287-296.score: 15.0
  28. Domenico Losurdo (2004). Towards a Critique of the Category of Totalitarianism. Historical Materialism 12 (2):25-55.score: 15.0
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  29. David Ingram (1988). The Retreat of the Political in the Modern Age: Jean-Luc Nancy on Totalitarianism and Community. Research in Phenomenology 18 (1):93-124.score: 15.0
  30. Andrew Arato (2002). Dictatorship Before and After Totalitarianism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):473-503.score: 15.0
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  31. Emilio Gentile (2008). Fascism and the Italian Road to Totalitarianism. Constellations 15 (3):291-302.score: 15.0
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  32. Samuel Moyn (2004). The Ghosts of Totalitarianism. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (2):93–98.score: 15.0
    Tzvetan Todorov’s book, originally published in 2000 in French and now available in a superb translation, paused at the end of a violent century to attempt to assess how to remember it and what lessons we might learn.
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  33. Kurt Marko (1986). The Legitimacy of Totalitarianism — a Pseudo-Problem? Studies in East European Thought 31 (3):239-242.score: 15.0
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  34. Nathan Rotenstreich (2000). From Totality Via Totalitarianism to Human Disregard. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):791 - 805.score: 15.0
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  35. Michael Halberstam (1998). Totalitarianism as a Problem for the Modern Conception of Politics. Political Theory 26 (4):459-488.score: 15.0
    By the fourth decade of the twentieth century... the earthly paradise had been discredited at exactly the moment when it became realizable. George OrwellThe subterranean stream of Western history has finally come to the surface and usurped the dignity of our tradition.Hannah Arendt.
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  36. Anne Norton (2011). Democracy, Inc.: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism by Sheldon Wolin. Constellations 18 (2):262-263.score: 15.0
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  37. Christopher Cw Taylor (1986). Plato's Totalitarianism. Polis 5 (2):4-29.score: 15.0
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  38. Paul Cobben (2005). Cosmopolitanism or Totalitarianism. Ethical Perspectives 12 (4):465-479.score: 15.0
    This article argues against the opinion that only the world-state can do justice to the universality of the moral person. The exclusion by the legal order of a nation state does not necessarily contradict the universality of the moral person, but can rather be the presupposition of its validity: namely if this legal order derives its legitimacy from being the historical institutionalisation of universal freedom. It is discussed how nation states, which legitimate themselves accordingly, must support, on penalty of inconsistency, (...)
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  39. Bernard Crick (1977). On Rereading The Origins of Totalitarianism. Social Research 44.score: 15.0
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  40. Kurt Marko (1983). Over Again: The Main Causes of 'Modern' Totalitarianism. Studies in East European Thought 25 (2):113-115.score: 15.0
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  41. J. Fiske (1998). Surveilling the City: Whiteness, the Black Man and Democratic Totalitarianism. Theory, Culture and Society 15 (2):67-88.score: 15.0
    This article details the rapid extension of the video surveillance of downtown `public' spaces. Its main argument is that this surveillance is racially differentiated, and that it zones the city differently for Blacks and whites, eroding the Black freedoms of movement and association, while leaving those of whites intact. It also considers isses of privacy as a political zone of potential social change, and raises concern about its video-electronic erosion. The argument is set within the overall argument that underneath the (...)
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  42. G. Ritter (1954). Direct Democracy and Totalitarianism. Diogenes 2 (7):59-67.score: 15.0
    The following article is an excerpt from Professor Gerhard Ritter's contribution to a Symposium on the origins and methods of National Socialism. This Symposium, whose publication in English translation is forthcoming, was organised under the auspices of the International Council for Philosophy and Humanistic Studies. The International Council for Philosophy and Humanistic Studies has assured complete freedom of expression to all participants while obviously not endorsing any of the opinions expressed in the Symposium.In presenting the material of this Symposium the (...)
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  43. Julia Hell (2006). Remnants of Totalitarianism: Hannah Arendt, Heiner Müller, Slavoj Žižek, and the Re-Invention of Politics. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (136):76-103.score: 15.0
    This article deals with two different but related attempts to reinvent politics as a radical revolutionary act, made by two intellectuals from the former Soviet Bloc, the philosopher Slavoj Žižek and the East German playwright Heiner Müller. I propose to read these reinventions against the foil of Hannah Arendt's passionate plea to rethink politics by breaking with the catastrophic imaginary born in the ruined landscapes of post-fascist Europe.2 Second, I will argue that we need to keep in mind the specific (...)
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  44. Martín Plot (2012). Tlön as Political Form: Democracy and Totalitarianism in Borges and Lefort. Constellations 19 (3):463-479.score: 15.0
  45. David Schultz (2003). Totalitarianism & the Modern Conception of Politics. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):276-277.score: 15.0
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  46. Tobin Siebers (1991). Kant and the Origins of Totalitarianism. Philosophy and Literature 15 (1):19-39.score: 15.0
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  47. François Villa (2014). The Psychoanalytical Method and the Disaster of Totalitarianism: Borderline States as the Psychical Equivalent of the Discontent in Civilization? Critical Inquiry 40 (2):267-287.score: 15.0
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  48. Young-Bruehl Elisabeth (2002). On the Origins of a New Totalitarianism. Social Research 69 (2).score: 15.0
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  49. Joseph P. Maguire (1946). Some Greek Views of Democracy and Totalitarianism. Ethics 56 (2):136-143.score: 15.0
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  50. Zoravko Popov (1990). Totalitarianism and Education. Inquiry 6 (2):3-4.score: 15.0
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