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Search results for 'Totalitarianism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Baehr (2010). Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    A study of Hannah Arendt's indictment of social science, approaches to totalitarianism (Bolshevism and National Socialism), and of the robust responses of her ...
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  2. Skaidra Trilupaityte (2007). Totalitarianism and the Problem of Soviet Art Evaluation: The Lithuanian Case. Studies in East European Thought 59 (4):261 - 280.score: 18.0
    By taking into account dissident/political and art historical interpretations of Soviet art, I analyze how polemics about totalitarianism in the West, which generally corresponded with Cold War debates and Eastern European dissident thought, shaped the post-Soviet evaluations of national artistic legacies. It is argued that the political relationship with the totalitarian past, like in many post-socialist areas where the immediate past was subjected to radical re-evaluation, affected Lithuanian artists’ and critics’ attitude towards local Soviet art. Because of an obvious (...)
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  3. Peter Baehr & Gordon C. Wells (2012). Debating Totalitarianism: An Exchange of Letters Between Hannah Arendt and Eric Voegelin. History and Theory 51 (3):364-380.score: 15.0
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  4. Gerhard Besier, Katarzyna Stokłosa & Andrew C. Wisely (eds.) (2008). Totalitarianism and Liberty: Hannah Arendt in the 21st Century. Księgarnia Akademicka.score: 15.0
     
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  5. Sumner Mac Lean (1987). Man, God, and State: The Interrelationships of Myth, Religion, and Totalitarianism. Athabascan Academic Pub..score: 15.0
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  6. Gershon Weiler (1994). From Absolutism to Totalitarianism: Carl Schmitt on Thomas Hobbes. Hollowbrook Pub..score: 15.0
  7. Marc De Kesel (2004). Act Without Denial: Slavoj Žižek on Totalitarianism, Revolution and Political Act. Studies in East European Thought 56 (4):299-334.score: 12.0
    iek's thinking departs from the Lacanian claim that we live in a symbolic order, not a real world, and that the Real is what we desire, but can never know or grasp. There is a fundamental virtuality of reality that points to the lie in every truth-claim, and there are two ways of dealing with this:repression and denial. An ideology, a system or a regime becomes totalitarian when it denies the virtual character of both its world and its subject (democracy (...)
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  8. Vicky Iakovou (2009). Totalitarianism as a Non-State On Hannah Arendt's Debt to Franz Neumann. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (4):429-447.score: 12.0
    The objective of this article is to show that Hannah Arendt’s understanding of totalitarianism is indebted to the analysis of National Socialism elaborated by Franz Neumann in Behemoth: The Structure and Practice of National Socialism . It is argued that Arendt adopted the central thesis of Neumann according to which Nazi Germany is a ‘non-state’ and that this thesis as well as its presuppositions are discernible in her overall approach, developed in The Origins of Totalitarianism.
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  9. Peter Baehr (2004). Of Politics and Social Science 'Totalitarianism' in the Dialogue of David Riesman and Hannah Arendt. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (2):191-217.score: 12.0
    During the late 1940s and early 1950s, David Riesman and Hannah Arendt were engaged in an animated discussion about the meaning and character of totalitarianism. Their disagreement reflected, in part, different experiences and dissonant intellectual backgrounds. Arendt abhorred the social sciences, finding them pretentious and obfuscating. Riesman, in contrast, abandoned a career in law to take up the sociological vocation, which he combined with his own heterodox brand of humanistic psychology. This article delineates the stakes of the Arendt Riesman (...)
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  10. Lucian W. Pye (2000). Traumatized Political Cultures: The After Effects of Totalitarianism in China and Russia. Japanese Journal of Political Science 1 (1):113-128.score: 12.0
    Developments in both China and Russia are a challenge to political science, and more particularly to theories of political culture. Both countries are engaged in profound processes of transition involving the abandonment of totalitarianism and the adoption of market-based economies. It is, however, far from clear what form their political systems will eventually take. They are currently following strikingly different paths. Are the differences a reflection of their distinctive cultures? Or, are the differences more structural, a manifestation of their (...)
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  11. Peter Baehr (2010). China the Anomaly Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Maoist Regime. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (3):267-286.score: 12.0
    During the autumn of 1949, Hannah Arendt completed the manuscript of The Origins of Totalitarianism. On 1 October of the same year, the People’s Republic of China was founded under the leadership of Mao Zedong. This article documents Arendt’s claim in 1949 that the prospects of totalitarianism in China were ‘frighteningly good’, and yet her ambivalent judgment, on the eve of the Cultural Revolution, about the totalitarian character of the Maoist regime. Despite being the premier theorist of totalitarian (...)
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  12. Peter Beilharz (2002). Modernity and Communism: Zygmunt Bauman and the Other Totalitarianism. Thesis Eleven 70 (1):88-99.score: 12.0
    Bauman's work can be understood as a critical theory, but its east European context needs to be established alongside the west European sensibilities of the Frankfurt School. The question of Soviet modernity and the status of the Polish experience of which Bauman was part need to be placed alongside the more famous critique of the Holocaust, which can be more readily aligned with Horkheimer and Adorno's views in Dialectic of Enlightenment. To this end, some of Bauman's essays and arguments on (...)
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  13. James Chappel (2011). The Catholic Origins of Totalitarianism Theory in Interwar Europe. Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):561-590.score: 12.0
    Totalitarianism theory was one of the ratifying principles of the Cold War, and remains an important component of contemporary political discourse. Its origins, however, are little understood. Although widely seen as a secular product of anticommunist socialism, it was originally a theological notion, rooted in the political theory of Catholic personalism. Specifically, totalitarianism theory was forged by Catholic intellectuals in the mid-1930s, responding to Carl Schmitt's turn to the in 1931. In this essay I explore the notion's formation (...)
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  14. Jeffrey Herf (2006). Narratives of Totalitarianism: Nazism's Anti-Semitic Propaganda During World War II and the Holocaust. Telos 2006 (135):32-60.score: 12.0
    In recent decades, historians have probed the kinds of narratives that they tell in constructing the past. In the process, we have devoted too little attention to the ways that historical actors themselves translate beliefs and ideologies into narratives of events, which themselves become causal factors of great importance. In this essay, and the longer work from which it is drawn, I examine this translation as it emerged in Nazi Germany's anti-Semitic propaganda campaigns during World War II and the Holocaust. (...)
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  15. Sigrid Meuschel (2000). Theories of Totalitarianism and Modern Dictatorships: A Tentative Approach. Thesis Eleven 61 (1):87-98.score: 12.0
    This essay discusses totalitarian theories with regard to their capacity to interpret in a normatively plausible way such different dictatorships as Nazism, Stalinism and post-Stalinism. In contrast to theoretical approaches which subsume all these regimes under a single concept (totalitarianism as total control), it argues in favor of discerning terror and ideology as main characteristics (totalitarianism as extermination). The focus on National Socialism and Stalinism needs further differentiation. Theories of bureaucratic structures and charismatic domination may help in distinguishing (...)
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  16. Alfons Söllner (2004). Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism in its Original Context. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (2):219-238.score: 12.0
    The objective of this article is to contribute to an understanding of Hannah Arendt’s special place in present-day political theory by means of a contrast between her Origins of Totalitarianism and four important political science studies of National Socialism and totalitarianism, three written by authors who shared the status of involuntary emigrant with Arendt, that are offered as constituting the original context of her work. A critical appreciation of the seminal works by Ernst Fraenkel, Franz L. Neumann, Sigmund (...)
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  17. Seyla Benhabib (2009). International Law and Human Plurality in the Shadow of Totalitarianism: Hannah Arendt and Raphael Lemkin. Constellations 16 (2):331-350.score: 9.0
  18. Anson Rabinbach (2006). Moments of Totalitarianism. History and Theory 45 (1):72–100.score: 9.0
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  19. David Ingram (1988). The Retreat of the Political in the Modern Age: Jean-Luc Nancy on Totalitarianism and Community. Research in Phenomenology 18 (1):93-124.score: 9.0
  20. Robert Mayhew (1997). Part and Whole in Aristotle's Political Philosophy. Journal of Ethics 1 (4):325-340.score: 9.0
    It is often held that according to Aristotle the city is a natural organism. One major reason for this organic interpretation is no doubt that Aristotle describes the relationship between the individual and the city as a part-whole relationship, seemingly the same relationship that holds between the parts of a natural organism and the organism itself. Moreover, some scholars (most notably Jonathan Barnes) believe this view of the city led Aristotle to accept an implicit totalitarianism. I argue, however, that (...)
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  21. Jay Bergman (1998). Was the Soviet Union Totalitarian? The View of Soviet Dissidents and the Reformers of the Gorbachev Era. Studies in East European Thought 50 (4):247-281.score: 9.0
    The article explains why Soviet dissidents and the reformers of the Gorbachev era chose to characterize the Soviet system as totalitarian. The dissidents and the reformers strongly disagreed among themselves about the origins of Soviet totalitarianism. But both groups stressed the effects of totalitarianism on the individual personality; in doing so, they revealed themselves to be the heirs of the tsarist intelligentsia. Although the concept of totalitarianism probably obscures more than it clarifies when it is applied to (...)
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  22. Peg Birmingham (2008). Elated Citizenry: Deception and the Democratic Task of Bearing Witness. Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):198-215.score: 9.0
    It has become nearly a truism for contemporary theorists of democracy to understand the democratic space as agonistic and contested. The shadow that haunts thinkers of democracy today, and out of which this assumption emerges, is the specter of totalitarianism with its claims to a totalizing knowledge in the form of ideology and a totalizing power of a sovereign will that claims to be the embodiment of the law. Caught up in these totalizing claims, the citizenry becomes elated. The (...)
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  23. Domenico Losurdo (2004). Towards a Critique of the Category of Totalitarianism. Historical Materialism 12 (2):25-55.score: 9.0
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  24. Emilio Gentile (2008). Fascism and the Italian Road to Totalitarianism. Constellations 15 (3):291-302.score: 9.0
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  25. Samuel Moyn (2004). The Ghosts of Totalitarianism. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (2):93–98.score: 9.0
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  26. Anne Norton (2011). Democracy, Inc.: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism by Sheldon Wolin. Constellations 18 (2):262-263.score: 9.0
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  27. Roy T. Tsao (2007). Second Thoughts, New Beginnings: Notes on Arendt's Unmarked Itinerary From the Origins of Totalitarianism to the Human Condition. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (1):7-27.score: 9.0
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  28. Martin Shuster (2012). Language and Loneliness: Arendt, Cavell, and Modernity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):473-497.score: 9.0
    Abstract Many have been struck by Hannah Arendt?s remarks on loneliness in the concluding pages of The Origins of Totalitarianism, but very few have attempted to deal with the remarks in any systematic way. What is especially striking about this state of affairs is that the remarks are crucial to the account contained therein, as they betray a view of agency that undergirds the rest of the account. This article develops Arendt?s thinking on loneliness throughout her corpus, showing how (...)
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  29. Paul Cobben (2005). Cosmopolitanism or Totalitarianism. Ethical Perspectives 12 (4):465-479.score: 9.0
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  30. Dana Villa (2008). Political Violence and Terror: Arendtian Reflections. Ethics and Global Politics 1 (3).score: 9.0
    This essay takes a critical look at the rubric “age of terror,” a rubric which has enjoyed a certain amount of theoretical and philosophical cachet in recent years. My argument begins by noting the continuity between this hypostatization and contemporary “war on terror” rhetoric, a continuity that is, in certain respects, ironic given the politics of the “age of terror” theorists. It then moves—via Machiavelli, Max Weber, and Hannah Arendt—to a consideration of the topics of state violence (on the one (...)
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  31. G. Ritter (1954). Direct Democracy and Totalitarianism. Diogenes 2 (7):59-67.score: 9.0
    The following article is an excerpt from Professor Gerhard Ritter's contribution to a Symposium on the origins and methods of National Socialism. This Symposium, whose publication in English translation is forthcoming, was organised under the auspices of the International Council for Philosophy and Humanistic Studies. The International Council for Philosophy and Humanistic Studies has assured complete freedom of expression to all participants while obviously not endorsing any of the opinions expressed in the Symposium.In presenting the material of this Symposium the (...)
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  32. Nathan Rotenstreich (2000). From Totality Via Totalitarianism to Human Disregard. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):791 - 805.score: 9.0
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  33. David Schultz (2003). Totalitarianism & the Modern Conception of Politics. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):276-277.score: 9.0
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  34. François Villa (2014). The Psychoanalytical Method and the Disaster of Totalitarianism: Borderline States as the Psychical Equivalent of the Discontent in Civilization? Critical Inquiry 40 (2):267-287.score: 9.0
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  35. Bernard Crick (forthcoming). On Rereading" The Origins of Totalitarianism". Social Research.score: 9.0
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  36. Michael Halberstam (1998). Totalitarianism as a Problem for the Modern Conception of Politics. Political Theory 26 (4):459-488.score: 9.0
    By the fourth decade of the twentieth century... the earthly paradise had been discredited at exactly the moment when it became realizable. George OrwellThe subterranean stream of Western history has finally come to the surface and usurped the dignity of our tradition.Hannah Arendt.
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  37. Ira Katznelson (forthcoming). Does the End of Totalitarianism Signify the End of Ideology? Social Research.score: 9.0
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  38. Joseph P. Maguire (1946). Some Greek Views of Democracy and Totalitarianism. Ethics 56 (2):136-143.score: 9.0
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  39. Kurt Marko (1986). The Legitimacy of Totalitarianism — a Pseudo-Problem? Studies in East European Thought 31 (3):239-242.score: 9.0
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  40. Martín Plot (2012). Tlön as Political Form: Democracy and Totalitarianism in Borges and Lefort. Constellations 19 (3):463-479.score: 9.0
  41. Sergio Sergio Ortiz Leroux (2012). Democracia y totalitarismo: La dimensión simbólica de lo político según Claude Lefort. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (36).score: 9.0
    El súbito consenso que se ha producido en nuestros días alrededor de la importancia de la noción democracia no se ha acompañado de una reflexión filosófica sobre su sentido moderno. La obra filosófica de Claude Lefort ha contribuido a llenar este vacío teórico. Para Lefort, el sentido de la democracia moderna no puede revelarse, como ha supuesto la ciencia política, a través de la descripción del funcionamiento de sus instituciones, sino puede estudiarse mediante la exploración de su dimensión simbólica. En (...)
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  42. Trudy Govier (1996). Trust and Totalitarianism: Some Suggestive Examples. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (3):149-163.score: 9.0
  43. Roberto Esposito (2008). Totalitarianism or Biopolitics? Concerning a Philosophical Interpretation of the Twentieth Century. Critical Inquiry 34 (4):633-644.score: 9.0
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  44. Clarence J. Karier (1964). Totalitarianism of the Right. Educational Theory 14 (1):40-49.score: 9.0
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  45. Jerome Kohn (2002). Arendt's Concept and Description of Totalitarianism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (2):621-656.score: 9.0
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  46. Zdeněk Konopásek & Zuzana Kusá (2006). Political Screenings as Trials of Strength: Making the Communist Power/Lessness Real. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (3):341 - 362.score: 9.0
    In this paper, we discuss the problem of communist power in so called totalitarian regimes. Inspired by strategies of explanation in contemporary science studies and by the ethnomethodological conception of social order, we suggest that the power of communists is not to be taken as an unproblematic source of explanation; rather, we take this power as something that is itself in need of being explained. We study personal narratives on political screenings that took place in Czechoslovakia in 1970 and analyze (...)
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  47. Tobin Siebers (1991). Kant and the Origins of Totalitarianism. Philosophy and Literature 15 (1):19-39.score: 9.0
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  48. Peter Skagestad (1988). On History's Witness Stand: Rubashov, Bukharin, and the Logic of Totalitarianism. Inquiry 31 (1):3 – 24.score: 9.0
    The replacement, under totalitarian regimes, of multiple sources of information with a single information monopoly confers an indeterminacy on the concepts of truth, fact, objectivity, and reality. From a pragmatist perspective, these words can then no longer mean exactly what they mean to speakers accustomed to freedom of discussion and inquiry. This corruption of discourse is detailed, e.g., in Arthur Koestler's Darkness at Noon, where criteria for belief?formation are ultimately completely divorced from the objects of belief. Like George Orwell, Koestler (...)
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  49. Antonio Y. Vázquez-Arroyo (2011). Inverted Totalitarianism. Telos 2011 (156):167-177.score: 9.0
    ExcerptNow that the Bush administration has left the White House, several questions emerge, not the least of which is the crucial question about its place in the longue durée of the American polity. A corollary of this question, which is perhaps even more vexing, regards the lasting effect of these years on the United States' political form. Not that versions of this question have not been posed. Books on the so-called new American empire, to be sure, have flooded the North (...)
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  50. Matthew Crippen (2007). The Totalitarianism of Therapeutic Philosophy: Reading Wittgenstein Through Critical Theory. Essays in Philosophy 8 (1):3.score: 9.0
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