Search results for 'Touch History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael J. Morgan (1977). Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch, and the Philosophy of Perception. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
     
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  2. Marjorie O'Rourke Boyle (1998). Senses of Touch: Human Dignity and Deformity From Michelangelo to Calvin. Brill.score: 72.0
    From posture to piety, from manicure to magic, the book discovers touch in a critical period of its historical development, in anatomy and society.
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  3. A. L. Macfie (ed.) (2007). The Philosophy of History: Talks Given at the Ihr, London, 2000-2006. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 54.0
    The Philosophy of History contains a selection of the talks given at the Philosophy of History seminar in the Institute of Historical Research, London, in the period 2000-6. It puts students of the Philosophy of History, historians, teachers of History and anyone else interested in the subject in touch with what is being researched and discussed today at the cutting edge of Philosophy of History studies. With contributions from, among others, Robert Burns, Keith Jenkins, (...)
     
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  4. A. L. Macfie (ed.) (2006). The Philosophy of History: Talks Given at the Institute of Historical Research, London, 2000-2006. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 54.0
    The Philosophy of History contains a selection of the talks given at the Philosophy of History seminar in the Institute of Historical Research, London, in the period 2000-6. It puts students of the Philosophy of History, historians, teachers of History and anyone else interested in the subject in touch with what is being researched and discussed today at the cutting edge of Philosophy of History studies. With contributions from, among others, Robert Burns, Keith Jenkins, (...)
     
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  5. Thomas Junker (1996). Factors Shaping Ernst Mayr's Concepts in the History of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):29 - 77.score: 48.0
    As frequently pointed out in this discussion, one of the most characteristic features of Mayr's approach to the history of biology stems from the fact that he is dealing to a considerable degree with his own professional history. Furthermore, his main criterion for the selection of historical episodes is their relevance for modern biological theory. As W. F. Bynum and others have noted, the general impression of his reviewers is that “one of the towering figures of evolutionary biology (...)
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  6. Natalie Binczek (2007). Kontakt: Der Tastsinn in Texten der Aufklärung. Niemeyer.score: 48.0
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  7. Fawn M. McNeil-Haber (2004). Ethical Considerations in the Use of Nonerotic Touch in Psychotherapy with Children. Ethics and Behavior 14 (2):123 – 140.score: 42.0
    Although touch frequently occurs in psychotherapy with children, there is little written on the ethical considerations of therapeutic touch. Because physical contact does occur, therapists must consider if, how, and when it is used, for both their clients' safety and their own. In this review, I further develop the issues suggested by Aquino and Lee (2000) in the use of nurturing touch in therapy by considering many types of touch that occur in psychotherapy with children; the (...)
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  8. Stephen Barker (2009). Threshold (Pro-)Positions: Touch, Techné, Technics. Derrida Today 2 (1):44-65.score: 42.0
    Touching on Nancy and Derrida offers a glimpse not only into the thesis both of Jean-Luc Nancy's critique of touch and of Derrida's Le Toucher, but also into the threshold of a technology of (the) sense to come. This glimpse is an interrogation, and one that is both historic and historical, in the sense that Derrida, in addressing Jean-Luc Nancy's work, has presented us with an encyclopedic history of touch in the philosophic tradition from Aristotle to Nancy, (...)
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  9. Margaret Boden (2008). Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    The development of cognitive science is one of the most remarkable and fascinating intellectual achievements of the modern era. The quest to understand the mind is as old as recorded human thought; but the progress of modern science has offered new methods and techniques which have revolutionized this enquiry. Oxford University Press now presents a masterful history of cognitive science, told by one of its most eminent practitioners. -/- Cognitive science is the project of understanding the mind by modelling (...)
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  10. Eduardo Cadava (1998). Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History. Princeton University Press.score: 42.0
    Focusing on Walter Benjamin's discussions of the flashes and images of history, this book argues that the questions raised by this link between photography and history touch on issues that belong to the entire trajectory of Benjamin's ...
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  11. Roger I. Simon (2005). The Touch of the Past: Remembrance, Learning, and Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
    Based on ten years of research, The Touch of the Past considers how historically traumatic events uniquely summon forgetting and remembrance. Within a specific focus on events of systemic mass violence, Roger Simon examines how testimonies of historic events influence learning as communities struggle with "difficult histories." The Touch of the Past is a serious and compelling contribution to research in education, historical consciousness, and memory/trauma studies.
     
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  12. Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces (...)
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  13. Stefan Hopmann (1999). The Curriculum as a Standard of Public Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):89-105.score: 36.0
    This contribution first searches for historical and empirical evidence for whether and how curricula act or acted as a measure of public education. The problem is explicated on account of a short history of curriculum work and distinguished in a analytical, a political, programmatical and practical discourse of curriculum work. Curriculum work always underlies premises of planning, learning and effects. Three models are finally developed and brought in touch with the different discourses. Curriculum work proves to be an (...)
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  14. Anna Hartmann Cavalcanti (2013). Nietzsche, a memória E a história; reflexões sobre a segunda consideração extemporânea. Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 17 (2):77-105.score: 36.0
    As of 1869, and throughout the entire period during which he wrote the essay “On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life”, published in 1874, Nietzsche was a classical philology professor at the University of Basel. During this period, he reflected critically on theoretical and methodological questions in his field, emphasizing that if the study of Antiquity is to be linked to the analysis and critique of the sources, it loses, through this, contact with its own time, becoming (...)
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  15. Klaus Gahl (1999). Über Die Einheit des Menschen Aus Ärztlicher Sicht. Ethik in der Medizin 11 (1):2-11.score: 36.0
    Definition of the problem: Discussions of “holistic” medical practice confine themselves to the treatment of so-called “psychosomatic disorders”. This paper traces ways in which the patient's personal unity may become apparent to medical practitioners during three critical steps of everyday practice: physical examination, “medical history” (anamnesis) and treatment. Physical examination touches on the patient's “Leiblichkeit” (his “organ” of bodily self-awareness of being a person). Objectifying of the “Leiblichkeit” may constitute an infringement upon the patient's personal unity and is only (...)
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  16. Joseph Margolis (2013). Pragmatism Ascendent: A Yard of Narrative, a Touch of Prophecy. Stanford University Press.score: 36.0
    The point of Hegel's dissatisfaction with Kant -- Rethinking Peirce's fallibilism -- Pragmatism's future : a touch of prophecy.
     
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  17. William Lane Craig (2009). 'Noli Me Tangere': Why John Meier Won't Touch the Risen Lord. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):91-97.score: 30.0
    John Meier distinguishes ‘the real Jesus’ from ‘the historical Jesus’. Meier claims that whatever happened to the real Jesus after his death, his resurrection cannot belong to the historical Jesus because that event is in principle not open to the observation of any observer. But why think that the resurrection is not observable in this way? Meier finds justification in Gerald O'Collins' view that although the resurrection of Jesus is a real event, it is not an event in space and (...)
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  18. Rebecca Steiner Goldner (2011). Touch and Flesh in Aristotle's de Anima. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):435-446.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue for the sense of touch as primary in Aristotle’s account of sensation. Touch, as the identifying and inaugurating distinction of sensate beings, is both of utmost importance to Aristotle as well as highly aporetic on his explanation. The issue of touch and the problematic of flesh, in particular, bring us to Merleau-Ponty’s account of flesh as the chiasmic fold and overlap of subject and object, of self and other, and to an incipient (...)
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  19. Uljana Feest & Thomas Sturm (2011). What (Good) is Historical Epistemology? Editors' Introduction. Erkenntnis 75 (3):285-302.score: 24.0
    We provide an overview of three ways in which the expression “Historical epistemology” (HE) is often understood: (1) HE as a study of the history of higher-order epistemic concepts such as objectivity, observation, experimentation, or probability; (2) HE as a study of the historical trajectories of the objects of research, such as the electron, DNA, or phlogiston; (3) HE as the long-term study of scientific developments. After laying out various ways in which these agendas touch on current debates (...)
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  20. Christine James (1997). Feminism and Masculinity: Reconceptualizing the Dichotomy of Reason and Emotion. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 17 (1/2):129-152.score: 24.0
    In the context of feminist and postmodern thought, traditional conceptions of masculinity and what it means to be a “Real Man” have been critiqued. In Genevieve Lloyd's The Man of Reason, this critique takes the form of exposing the effect that the distinctive masculinity of the “man of reason” has had on the history of philosophy. One major feature of the masculine-feminine dichotomy will emerge as a key notion for understanding the rest of the paper: the dichotomy of reason-feeling, (...)
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  21. Fiona Macpherson (ed.) (2011). The Senses: Classic and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The senses, or sensory modalities, constitute the different ways we have of perceiving the world, such as seeing, hearing, touching, tasting and smelling. But how many senses are there? How many could there be? What makes the senses different? What interaction takes place between the senses? This book is a guide to thinking about these questions. Together with an extensive introduction to the topic, the book contains the key classic papers on this subject together with nine newly commissioned essays. -/- (...)
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  22. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  23. John Sutton (2013). Soul and Body in Seventeenth-Century British Philosophy. In Peter Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. 285-307.score: 24.0
    Ideas about soul and body – about thinking or remembering, mind and life, brain and self – remain both diverse and controversial in our neurocentric age. The history of these ideas is significant both in its own right and to aid our understanding of the complex sources and nature of our concepts of mind, cognition, and psychology, which are all terms with puzzling, difficult histories. These topics are not the domain of specialists alone, and studies of emotion, perception, or (...)
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  24. Sara Shute (1981). Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch, and the Philosophy of Perception. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):255-257.score: 24.0
  25. Mical Raz (forthcoming). Deprived of Touch: How Maternal and Sensory Deprivation Theory Converged in Shaping Early Debates Over Autism. History of the Human Sciences.score: 24.0
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  26. Christy Mag Uidhir (2012). The Aesthetics of Actor-Character Race Matching in Film Fictions. Philosophers' Imprint 12 (3).score: 24.0
    Marguerite Clark as Topsy in Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1918). Charlton Heston as Ramon Miguel Vargas in Touch of Evil (1958). Mizuo Peck as Sacagawea in Night at the Museum (2006). From the early days of cinema to its classic-era through to the contemporary Hollywood age, the history of cinema is replete with films in which the racial (or ethnic) background of a principal character does not match the background of the actor or actress portraying that character. I call (...)
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  27. Antonio Zirión (2000). Phenomenology in Mexico: A Historical Profile. Continental Philosophy Review 33 (1):75-92.score: 24.0
    The paper presents a journey along the history of phenomenology (Husserlian Phenomenology or phenomenology derived from Husserl) in Mexico, dealing mainly with its appropriation in the field of philosophy proper. The survey covers almost the whole century, leaving out only the last years and the present situation. Although all those philosophers who came in touch with phenomenology in a significant way in that period are mentioned here, particular attention is laid upon three figures and their meaning in Mexican (...)
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  28. Christopher Norris (2009). Badiou on Set Theory, Ontology and Truth. Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):51-72.score: 24.0
    Alain Badiou is a highly original, indeed decidedly iconoclastic thinker whose work has ranged widely over areas of equal concern to philosophers in the ‘continental’ and mainstream analytic traditions. These areas include ontology, epistemology, ethics, politics, and – above all – philosophy of mathematics. It is unfortunate, and symptomatic of prevailing attitudes, that his work has so far receivedminimal attention from commentators in the analytic line of descent. Here I try to help the process of reception along by describing Badiou’s (...)
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  29. Josh Benton (2011). Art/Porn: A History of Seeing and Touching by Dennis, Kelly. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):340-342.score: 24.0
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  30. C. Stephen Byrum (1983). A Primer on Giordano Bruno. Philosophy Research Archives 9:303-336.score: 24.0
    In a rather obscure moment in James Joyce’s Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, Stephen Dedalus enters into a conversation with an equally obscure character named Ghezzi. The conversation concerns the Nolan, Giordano Bruno. Ghezzi recalls that Bruno was a “terrible heretic,” and expresses “some sorrow” that he was burned at the stake.For the history of philosophy, there may similarly be “some sorrow” that little more is known about Bruno than that which is contained in Joyce’s reference. (...)
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  31. Christine James (1996). Reconceptualizing Masculinity: Review Essay. disClosure 1996 (Reason Incorporated):74-83.score: 24.0
    Recent feminist and postmodern thought has critiqued traditional conceptions of masculinity, describing the effect that the distinctive masculinity of the "man of reason" has had on the history of philosophy, on consciousness, and on the academy. A common characteristic of the recent literature on masculinity is that it reflects the historical and cultural context in which it is written -- a context of binary, hierarchical dualisms which involve certain symbolic associations. These dualisms, such as Man-Woman, masculine-feminine, and reason-emotion, arguably (...)
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  32. Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1973). Adventures of the Dialectic. Evanston [Ill.]Northwestern University Press.score: 24.0
    Preface WE NEED A PHILOSOPHY of both history and spirit to deal with the problems we touch upon here. Yet we would be unduly rigorous if we were to wait for ...
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  33. Martin Stokhof, The Company of Objects.score: 24.0
    Objects come to us, and we to them, in many different ways: by touch, vision, smell; in thought, language, imagination. We access them directly and manipulate them; or we approach them indirectly and keep our distance. Sometimes we do so at the same time: we pick up an object and ask ourselves where we bought it, or what it is for; we look at an object and admire its shape or colour. But often we simply take the object and (...)
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  34. Frank van Dun, The Science of Law and Legal Studies.score: 24.0
    This paper attempts to clarify some of the logical and conceptual issues in the philosophical dispute about law that has pitted the legal positivists against the adherents of natural law. The first part looks at the basic concepts that are relevant to that discussion and at the methodological implications of studying law either as an order of natural persons (natural law) or as a system of rules or an order of rule-defined artificial persons (legal order). Thus, we find that the (...)
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  35. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Part One Proponent Meets Skeptic. In Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic.score: 24.0
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite (...)
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  36. Rodney Cotterill, English > About Us > Staff.score: 24.0
    The first brief description is given of a project aimed at searching for the neural correlates of consciousness through computer simulation. The underlying model is based on the known circuitry of the mammalian nervous system, the neuronal groups of which are approximated as binary composite units. The simulated nervous system includes just two senses - hearing and touch - and it History..
     
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  37. Laura Duhan Kaplan (2000). Talmud, Totality, and Jewish Pluralism. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (1):47-51.score: 24.0
    Levinas’s conception of listening for the “trace” of the infinite implies that the human spirit grows when it comes into contact with something greater than it had previously known. When Levinas reads the Talmud, sourcebook of Jewish Law, he tries to enter into conversation with it, allowing the meaning of the text to expand to touch his own contemporary concerns. At the flip side of this expansion, however, lies my worry that the text junctions as a “totality,” assimilating all (...)
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  38. Michael Cournoyea (2010). Steven Shapin. The Scientific Life: A Moral History of a Late Modern Vocation. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):273-275.score: 24.0
    In The Scientific Life, Steven Shapin argues that people and their virtues matter in late modern science. While scientists struggle to remain objective and impersonal, it is the personal, familiar, and charismatic—the traits once swept aside as vices by the scientifically virtuous—that have come to embody the “truth-speakers” of late modernity. With an enormous and sometimes daunting wealth of primary sources (from technical commentaries to his own sociological fieldwork), Steven Shapin breathes life back into these quotidian virtues. The Scientific Life (...)
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  39. Han-Liang Chang (2003). Notes Towards a Semiotics of Parasitism. Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):421-438.score: 24.0
    The metaphor of parasites or parasitism has dominated literary critical discourse since the 1970s, prominent examples being Michel Serres in France and J. Hillis Miller in America. In their writings the relationship between text and paratext, literature and criticism, is often likened to that between host and parasite, and can be therefore deconstructed. Their writings, along with those by Derrida, Barthes, and Thom, seem to be suggesting the possibility of a semiotics of parasitism. Unfortunately, none of these writers has drawn (...)
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  40. David A. Jopling (2008). Talking Cures and Placebo Effects. OUP Oxford.score: 24.0
    Psychoanalysis has had to defend itself from a barrage of criticism throughout its history. Nevertheless, there are many who claim to have been helped by this therapy, and who claim to have achieved genuine insight into their condition. But do the psychodynamic or exploratory psychotherapies - the so-called talking cures - really help clients get in touch with their "inner", "real" or "true" selves? Do clients make important discoveries about the real causes of their behaviours, emotions, and personalities? (...)
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  41. Bronwyn Lay (2013). Driftwood. Continent 3 (2):22-27.score: 24.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  42. Hui-Ling Wu (2008). 老子論人與自然. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 51:31-35.score: 24.0
    The relationship between mankind and nature is a precarious one at best; at once seemingly irreconcilable and yet there is still certain interdependency. In discussing this relationship we need not merely touch upon modern science or environmentalism as the ancient Chinese thinker Lao-tzu had something to say on the matter in the pre-Qin period of Chinese history. But Lao-tzu writes not merely about the relationship between mankind and its environment, taking theterm ‘nature’ in a much broader sense. I (...)
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  43. Jeremy Fernando (2011). On Love and Poetry. Or, Where Philosophers Fear to Tread. Continent 1 (1):27-32.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 27-32. “My”—what does this word designate? Not what belongs to me, but what I belong to,what contains my whole being, which is mine insofar as I belong to it. Søren Kierkegaard. The Seducer’s Diary . I can’t sleep till I devour you / And I’ll love you, if you let me… Marilyn Manson “Devour” The role of poetry in the relationalities between people has a long history—from epic poetry recounting tales of yore; to emotive lyric poetry; (...)
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  44. Georg Geismann (2006). “Höchstes politisches Gut” — “höchstes Gut in einer welt”: Zum verhältnis Von moralphilosophie, geschichtsphilosophie und religionsphilosophie bei Kant. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (1):23 - 41.score: 24.0
    Kant's philosophy of history as well as his philosophy of religion are bound to his practical philosophy: both presuppose it and both belong to it as necessary supplementations. This fact, now, has time and again led to the attempt to interpret Kant's philosophy of right and of history on the one hand and his philosophy of morals and of religion on the other hand as being bound together within one and the same doctrine of the highest good. This (...)
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  45. Michał Heller (1994). Początek i koniec wszechświata w zamkniętym modelu Friedmana. Filozofia Nauki 3.score: 24.0
    How to define space-time singularities is a serious problem in general relativity. Schmidt's b-boundary construction was commonly regarded as leading to the best (and very elegant) definition of singularities: space-time is said to be singular if it contains at least one b-incomplete curve. Unfortunately, Bosshard (1976) and Johnson (1977) demonstrated that the b-boundary of the closed Friedman universe consists of the single point. This means that the initial and final singularieties (i.e., the beginning and the end of the Friedman world) (...)
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  46. Lori Jespersen (2010). From This Day On: Preserving Newfound Insight, Change & Growth in the Real-World. Devorss Publications.score: 24.0
    The millennial vision quest -- Who are the changers? -- The great name debate -- How to read this book -- Magicians, manipulators, and muses -- The trouble with generalization -- History speaks -- The world of men and everyday affairs -- First things first -- Coming to your senses -- Hearing -- Smell -- Taste -- Sight -- Touch -- Emotion -- What to do with all of this information -- Activities -- Allies -- The importance of (...)
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  47. Feliz Molina (2011). Investigative Poetics: In (Night)-Light of Akilah Oliver. Continent 1 (2):70-75.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 70-75. cartography of ghosts . . . And as a way to talk . . . of temporality the topography of imagination, this body whose dirty entry into the articulation of history as rapturous becoming & unbecoming, greeted with violence, i take permission to extend this grace —Akilah Oliver from “An Arriving Guard of Angels Thusly Coming To Greet” Our disappearance is already here. —Jacques Derrida, 117 I wrestled with death as a threshold, an aporia, a (...)
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  48. Anthony S. Oberman, Tal Brosh-Nissimov & Nachman Ash (2010). Medicine and the Holocaust: A Visit to the Nazi Death Camps as a Means of Teaching Medical Ethics in the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):821-826.score: 24.0
    A novel method of teaching military medical ethics, medical ethics and military ethics in the Israel Defense Force (IDF) Medical Corps, essential topics for all military medical personnel, is discussed. Very little time is devoted to medical ethics in medical curricula, and even less to military medical ethics. Ninety-five per cent of American students in eight medical schools had less than 1 h of military medical ethics teaching and few knew the basic tenets of the Geneva Convention. Medical ethics differs (...)
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  49. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida (...)
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