Search results for 'Touch History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael J. Morgan (1977). Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch, and the Philosophy of Perception. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
     
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  2. Marjorie O'Rourke Boyle (1998). Senses of Touch: Human Dignity and Deformity From Michelangelo to Calvin. Brill.score: 84.0
    From posture to piety, from manicure to magic, the book discovers touch in a critical period of its historical development, in anatomy and society.
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  3. A. L. Macfie (ed.) (2007). The Philosophy of History: Talks Given at the Ihr, London, 2000-2006. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 66.0
    The Philosophy of History contains a selection of the talks given at the Philosophy of History seminar in the Institute of Historical Research, London, in the period 2000-6. It puts students of the Philosophy of History, historians, teachers of History and anyone else interested in the subject in touch with what is being researched and discussed today at the cutting edge of Philosophy of History studies. With contributions from, among others, Robert Burns, Keith Jenkins, (...)
     
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  4. A. L. Macfie (ed.) (2006). The Philosophy of History: Talks Given at the Institute of Historical Research, London, 2000-2006. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 66.0
    The Philosophy of History contains a selection of the talks given at the Philosophy of History seminar in the Institute of Historical Research, London, in the period 2000-6. It puts students of the Philosophy of History, historians, teachers of History and anyone else interested in the subject in touch with what is being researched and discussed today at the cutting edge of Philosophy of History studies. With contributions from, among others, Robert Burns, Keith Jenkins, (...)
     
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  5. Thomas Junker (1996). Factors Shaping Ernst Mayr's Concepts in the History of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):29 - 77.score: 60.0
    As frequently pointed out in this discussion, one of the most characteristic features of Mayr's approach to the history of biology stems from the fact that he is dealing to a considerable degree with his own professional history. Furthermore, his main criterion for the selection of historical episodes is their relevance for modern biological theory. As W. F. Bynum and others have noted, the general impression of his reviewers is that “one of the towering figures of evolutionary biology (...)
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  6. Stephen Barker (2009). Threshold (Pro-)Positions: Touch, Techné, Technics. Derrida Today 2 (1):44-65.score: 54.0
    Touching on Nancy and Derrida offers a glimpse not only into the thesis both of Jean-Luc Nancy's critique of touch and of Derrida's Le Toucher, but also into the threshold of a technology of (the) sense to come. This glimpse is an interrogation, and one that is both historic and historical, in the sense that Derrida, in addressing Jean-Luc Nancy's work, has presented us with an encyclopedic history of touch in the philosophic tradition from Aristotle to Nancy, (...)
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  7. Fawn M. McNeil-Haber (2004). Ethical Considerations in the Use of Nonerotic Touch in Psychotherapy with Children. Ethics and Behavior 14 (2):123 – 140.score: 54.0
    Although touch frequently occurs in psychotherapy with children, there is little written on the ethical considerations of therapeutic touch. Because physical contact does occur, therapists must consider if, how, and when it is used, for both their clients' safety and their own. In this review, I further develop the issues suggested by Aquino and Lee (2000) in the use of nurturing touch in therapy by considering many types of touch that occur in psychotherapy with children; the (...)
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  8. Margaret Boden (2008). Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    The development of cognitive science is one of the most remarkable and fascinating intellectual achievements of the modern era. The quest to understand the mind is as old as recorded human thought; but the progress of modern science has offered new methods and techniques which have revolutionized this enquiry. Oxford University Press now presents a masterful history of cognitive science, told by one of its most eminent practitioners. -/- Cognitive science is the project of understanding the mind by modelling (...)
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  9. Eduardo Cadava (1998). Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    Focusing on Walter Benjamin's discussions of the flashes and images of history, this book argues that the questions raised by this link between photography and history touch on issues that belong to the entire trajectory of Benjamin's ...
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  10. Roger I. Simon (2005). The Touch of the Past: Remembrance, Learning, and Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 54.0
    Based on ten years of research, The Touch of the Past considers how historically traumatic events uniquely summon forgetting and remembrance. Within a specific focus on events of systemic mass violence, Roger Simon examines how testimonies of historic events influence learning as communities struggle with "difficult histories." The Touch of the Past is a serious and compelling contribution to research in education, historical consciousness, and memory/trauma studies.
     
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  11. Natalie Binczek (2007). Kontakt: Der Tastsinn in Texten der Aufklärung. Niemeyer.score: 48.0
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  12. Joseph Margolis (2013). Pragmatism Ascendent: A Yard of Narrative, a Touch of Prophecy. Stanford University Press.score: 48.0
    The point of Hegel's dissatisfaction with Kant -- Rethinking Peirce's fallibilism -- Pragmatism's future : a touch of prophecy.
     
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  13. William Lane Craig (2009). 'Noli Me Tangere': Why John Meier Won't Touch the Risen Lord. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):91-97.score: 42.0
    John Meier distinguishes ‘the real Jesus’ from ‘the historical Jesus’. Meier claims that whatever happened to the real Jesus after his death, his resurrection cannot belong to the historical Jesus because that event is in principle not open to the observation of any observer. But why think that the resurrection is not observable in this way? Meier finds justification in Gerald O'Collins' view that although the resurrection of Jesus is a real event, it is not an event in space and (...)
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  14. Rebecca Steiner Goldner (2011). Touch and Flesh in Aristotle's de Anima. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):435-446.score: 42.0
    In this paper, I argue for the sense of touch as primary in Aristotle’s account of sensation. Touch, as the identifying and inaugurating distinction of sensate beings, is both of utmost importance to Aristotle as well as highly aporetic on his explanation. The issue of touch and the problematic of flesh, in particular, bring us to Merleau-Ponty’s account of flesh as the chiasmic fold and overlap of subject and object, of self and other, and to an incipient (...)
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  15. Josh Benton (2011). Art/Porn: A History of Seeing and Touching by Dennis, Kelly. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):340-342.score: 40.0
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  16. Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces (...)
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  17. Sara Shute (1981). Molyneux's Question: Vision, Touch, and the Philosophy of Perception. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):255-257.score: 36.0
  18. Stefan Hopmann (1999). The Curriculum as a Standard of Public Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):89-105.score: 36.0
    This contribution first searches for historical and empirical evidence for whether and how curricula act or acted as a measure of public education. The problem is explicated on account of a short history of curriculum work and distinguished in a analytical, a political, programmatical and practical discourse of curriculum work. Curriculum work always underlies premises of planning, learning and effects. Three models are finally developed and brought in touch with the different discourses. Curriculum work proves to be an (...)
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  19. Mical Raz (forthcoming). Deprived of Touch: How Maternal and Sensory Deprivation Theory Converged in Shaping Early Debates Over Autism. History of the Human Sciences.score: 36.0
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  20. Anna Hartmann Cavalcanti (2013). Nietzsche, a memória E a história; reflexões sobre a segunda consideração extemporânea. Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 17 (2):77-105.score: 36.0
    As of 1869, and throughout the entire period during which he wrote the essay “On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life”, published in 1874, Nietzsche was a classical philology professor at the University of Basel. During this period, he reflected critically on theoretical and methodological questions in his field, emphasizing that if the study of Antiquity is to be linked to the analysis and critique of the sources, it loses, through this, contact with its own time, becoming (...)
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  21. Michael Cournoyea (2010). Steven Shapin. The Scientific Life: A Moral History of a Late Modern Vocation. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):273-275.score: 36.0
    In The Scientific Life, Steven Shapin argues that people and their virtues matter in late modern science. While scientists struggle to remain objective and impersonal, it is the personal, familiar, and charismatic—the traits once swept aside as vices by the scientifically virtuous—that have come to embody the “truth-speakers” of late modernity. With an enormous and sometimes daunting wealth of primary sources (from technical commentaries to his own sociological fieldwork), Steven Shapin breathes life back into these quotidian virtues. The Scientific Life (...)
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  22. Klaus Gahl (1999). Über Die Einheit des Menschen Aus Ärztlicher Sicht. Ethik in der Medizin 11 (1):2-11.score: 36.0
    Definition of the problem: Discussions of “holistic” medical practice confine themselves to the treatment of so-called “psychosomatic disorders”. This paper traces ways in which the patient's personal unity may become apparent to medical practitioners during three critical steps of everyday practice: physical examination, “medical history” (anamnesis) and treatment. Physical examination touches on the patient's “Leiblichkeit” (his “organ” of bodily self-awareness of being a person). Objectifying of the “Leiblichkeit” may constitute an infringement upon the patient's personal unity and is only (...)
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  23. Pauline Kleingeld (1999). Kant, History, and the Idea of Moral Development. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):59-80.score: 27.0
    I examine the consistency of Kant's notion of moral progress as found in his philosophy of history. To many commentators, Kant's very idea of moral development has seemed inconsistent with basic tenets of his critical philosophy. This idea has seemed incompatible with his claims that the moral law is unconditionally and universally valid, that moral agency is noumenal and atemporal, and that all humans are equally free. Against these charges, I argue not only that Kant's notion of moral development (...)
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  24. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 27.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and original arguments (...)
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  25. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.score: 27.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features entailing (...)
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  26. Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.score: 27.0
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity of the (...)
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  27. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 27.0
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection of history by formalists like Clive Bell. I then attempt to show how the arguments of people like Morris Weitz and Arthur Danto led to a re-appreciation of history by philosophers of art such as Richard Wollheim, Jerrold Levinson, Robert Stecker and others.
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  28. Carl Hammer (2008). Explication, Explanation, and History. History and Theory 47 (2):183–199.score: 27.0
    To date, no satisfactory account of the connection between natural-scientific and historical explanation has been given, and philosophers seem to have largely given up on the problem. This paper is an attempt to resolve this old issue and to sort out and clarify some areas of historical explanation by developing and applying a method that will be called “pragmatic explication” involving the construction of definitions that are justified on pragmatic grounds. Explanations in general can be divided into “dynamic” and “static” (...)
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  29. Jeff Malpas (2011). Truth, Narrative, and the Materiality of Memory: An Externalist Approach in the Philosophy of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):328-353.score: 27.0
    One of the most influential and significant developments in the philosophy of language over the last thirty years has been the rise of externalist conceptions of content. This essay aims to explore the implications of a form of externalism, largely derived from the work of Donald Davidson, for thinking about history, and in so doing to suggest one way in which contemporary philosophy of language may engage with contemporary philosophy of history. Much of the discussion focuses on the (...)
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  30. David Carr (2009). Experience, Temporality and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (4):335-354.score: 27.0
    Philosophers' reflections on history have been dominated for decades by two themes: representation and memory. On both of these accounts, historical inquiry is divided by a certain gap from what it seeks to find or wants to know, and its activity is seen by philosophers as that of bridging this gap. Against this background, the concept of experience, in spite of its apparent rootedness in the present, can be revived as a means of thinking about our connection to the (...)
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  31. Jari Kaukua & Vili Lähteenmäki (2010). Subjectivity as a Non-Textual Standard of Interpretation in the History of Philosophical Psychology. History & Theory 48 (1):21-37.score: 27.0
    Contemporary caution against anachronism in intellectual history, and the currently momentous theoretical emphasis on subjectivity in the philosophy of mind, are two prevailing conditions that set puzzling constraints for studies in the history of philosophical psychology. The former urges against assuming ideas, motives, and concepts that are alien to the historical intellectual setting under study, and combined with the latter suggests caution in relying on our intuitions regarding subjectivity due to the historically contingent characterizations it has attained in (...)
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  32. Stephen Gaukroger (2012). What Does History Matter to the History of Philosophy? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):406-424.score: 27.0
    Abstract Contrary to most modern interpretations, in the early modern period, history was an indispensable resource for many philosophers. The different uses of history by Bacon, Gassendi, Locke, and Hume are explored to establish the role of history as a resource in early-modern philosophy.
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  33. Anthony Burns (2011). Conceptual History and the Philosophy of the Later Wittgenstein: A Critique of Quentin Skinners Contextualist Method. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):54-83.score: 27.0
    Although first published in 1969, the methodological views advanced in Quentin Skinner's “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas” remain relevant today. In his article Skinner suggests that it would be inappropriate to even attempt to write the history of any idea or concept. In support of this view, Skinner advances two arguments, one derived from the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein and the other from that of J. L. Austin. In this paper I focus on the (...)
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  34. Jens Bartelson (2007). Philosophy and History in the Study of Political Thought. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (1):101-124.score: 27.0
    This article analyzes how the relationship between philosophy and history has been conceived within the study of political thought, and how different ways of conceiving this relationship in turn have affected the definition of the subject matter as well as the choice of methods within this field. My main argument is that the ways in which we conceive this relationship is dependent on the assumptions we make about the ontological status of concepts and their meaning. I start by discussing (...)
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  35. Serge Grigoriev (2012). Dewey: A Pragmatist View of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (2):173-194.score: 27.0
    Despite the centrality of the idea of history to Dewey's overall philosophical outlook, his brief treatment of philosophical issues in history has never attracted much attention, partly because of the dearth of the available material. Nonetheless, as argued in this essay, what we do have provides for the outlines of a comprehensive pragmatist view of history distinguished by an emphasis on methodological pluralism and a principled opposition to thinking of historical knowledge in correspondence terms. The key conceptions (...)
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  36. Eric Schliesser (2012). Four Species of Reflexivity and History of Economics in Economic Policy Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):425-445.score: 27.0
    Abstract This paper argues that history of economics has a fruitful, underappreciated role to play in the development of economics, especially when understood as a policy science. This goes against the grain of the last half century during which economics, which has undergone a formal revolution, has distanced itself from its `literary' past and practices precisely with the aim to be a more successful policy science. The paper motivates the thesis by identifying and distinguishing four kinds of reflexivity in (...)
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  37. John H. Zammito (2008). Kant's "Naturalistic" History of Mankind? Some Reservations. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):29-62.score: 27.0
    Among many important claims, Allen Wood in Kant's Ethical ought proposes that Kant's philosophy of history can be grasped as a "naturalist" approach, grounding human nature in biology. I suggest some reservations. First, I question Kant's conception of biology as (a still emergent) science. Second, I question Kant's extension of his notion of "natural predisposition" to reason and freedom. Third, I question the naturalism of Kant's philosophy of history by suggesting the excessive role providence must play in Kant's (...)
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  38. Simon Evnine (1993). Hume, Conjectural History, and the Uniformity of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):589-606.score: 27.0
    In this paper I argue that, in at least two cases - his discussions of the temporal precedence o f polytheism over monotheism and of the origins of civil society - we see Hume consigning to historical development certain aspects of reason which, as a comparison with Locke will show, have sometimes been held to be uniform. In the first of these cases Hume has recourse to claims about the general historical development of human thought. In the second case, the (...)
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  39. Eugen Zelenak (2011). On Sense, Reference, and Tone in History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):354-374.score: 27.0
    This paper tries to show how the Fregean semantic framework, especially the notions of sense and tone, can be used to explain certain features of history. Following Michael Dummett's interpretation of Gottlob Frege's notion of meaning, it is possible to conceive of historical works as proposing particular modes of presentation of past events. In fact, alternative historical works about the same past events could be viewed as differing in what sense and tone they express. In this paper, I first (...)
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  40. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.score: 27.0
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority (...)
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  41. Geza Kallay (2012). At T-Time, the Inchoative Nick of Time, and Statements About the Past: Time and History in the Analytic Philosophy of Language. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):322-351.score: 27.0
    The paper, drawing on articles by J. M. E. McTaggart, G. E. Moore, D. Davidson, J. L. Austin, B. Russell, A. J. Ayer and G. E. M. Anscombe, argues that the philosophy of language in the analytic tradition has developed an “inchoative“ view of time , and history is a problem as regards the existence of events in the past and how these events can be known. An alternative view is hinted at through the work of L. Wittgenstein and (...)
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  42. Steve Fuller (2012). Why Does History Matter to the Science Studies Disciplines? A Case for Giving the Past Back Its Future. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):562-585.score: 27.0
    Abstract Science and technology studies (STS) has perhaps provided the most ambitious set of challenges to the boundary separating history and philosophy of science since the 19th century idealists and positivists. STS is normally associated with `social constructivism', which when applied to history of science highlights the malleability of the modal structure of reality. Specifically, changes to what is (e.g. by the addition or removal of ideas or things) implies changes to what has been, can be and might (...)
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  43. Richard W. Burkhardt (1999). Ethology, Natural History, the Life Sciences, and the Problem of Place. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):489 - 508.score: 27.0
    Investigators of animal behavior since the eighteenth century have sought to make their work integral to the enterprises of natural history and/or the life sciences. In their efforts to do so, they have frequently based their claims of authority on the advantages offered by the special places where they have conducted their research. The zoo, the laboratory, and the field have been major settings for animal behavior studies. The issue of the relative advantages of these different sites has been (...)
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  44. J. M. Kuukkanen (2009). Towards a Philosophy of the History of Thought? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):25-54.score: 27.0
    There are a large number of disciplines that are interested in the theoretical aspects of the history of thought. Their perspectives and subjects may vary, but fundamentally they have a common research interest: the history of human thinking and its products. Despite this, they are studied in relative isolation. I argue that having different subjects as specific objects of research, such as political or scientific thinking, is not a valid justification for the separation. I propose the formation of (...)
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  45. Richard Creath (2010). The Role of History in Science. Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):207 - 214.score: 27.0
    The case often made by scientists (and philosophers) against history and the history of science in particular is clear. Insofar as a field of study is historical as opposed to law-based, it is trivial. Insofar as a field attends to the past of science as opposed to current scientific issues, its efforts are derivative and, by diverting attention from acquiring new knowledge, deplorable. This case would be devastating if true, but it has almost everything almost exactly wrong. The (...)
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  46. Leonid Grinin (2007). Production Revolutions and Periodization of History: A Comparative and Theoretic-Mathematical Approach. Social Evolution and History 6 (2).score: 27.0
    There is no doubt that periodization is a rather effective method of data ordering and analysis, but it deals with exceptionally complex types of processual and temporal phenomena and thus it simplifies historical reality. Many scholars emphasize the great importance of periodization for the study of history. In fact, any periodization suffers from one-sidedness and certain deviations from reality. However, the number and significance of such deviations can be radically diminished as the effectiveness of periodization is directly connected with (...)
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  47. Adrian Jones (2011). Historys So It Seems: Heidegger-Ian Phenomenologies and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):1-35.score: 27.0
    This article entitled “History's `So it seems'” explores the potential of phenomenology for the framing of histories which privilege partcipant perspectives. The theory agenda of the article adapts insights drawn from Heidegger's ontological hermeneutic of Da-sein - the human condition of being-there and being-aware (or not aware). The theory agenda also adapts Heidegger's readings of Heraclitus. The practical agenda of the article illustrates this potential of Heidegger's phenomenology for history by contrasting `so it once seemed' senses of the (...)
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  48. Melinda B. Fagan (2007). Wallace, Darwin, and the Practice of Natural History. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (4):601 - 635.score: 27.0
    There is a pervasive contrast in the early natural history writings of the co-discoverers of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin. In his writings from South America and the Malay Archipelago (1848-1852, 1854-1862). Wallace consistently emphasized species and genera, and separated these descriptions from his rarer and briefer discussions of individual organisms. In contrast, Darwin's writings during the Beagle voyage (1831-1836) emphasized individual organisms, and mingled descriptions of individuals and groups. The contrast is explained by the different (...)
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  49. Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). The Benefit to Philosophy of the Study of its History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1).score: 27.0
    This paper advances the view that the history of philosophy is both a kind of history and a kind of philosophy. Through a discussion of some examples from epistemology, metaphysics, and the historiography of philosophy, it explores the benefit to philosophy of a deep and broad engagement with its history. It comes to the conclusion that doing history of philosophy is a way to think outside the box of the current philosophical orthodoxies. Somewhat paradoxically, far from (...)
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  50. James Llana (2000). Natural History and the "Encyclopédie". Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):1 - 25.score: 27.0
    The general popularity of natural history in the eighteenth century is mirrored in the frequency and importance of the more than 4,500 articles on natural history in the "Encyclopédie". The main contributors to natural history were Daubenton, Diderot, Jaucourt and d'Holbach, but some of the key animating principles derive from Buffon, who wrote nothing specifically for the "Encyclopédie". Still, a number of articles reflect his thinking, especially his antipathy toward Linnaeus. There was in principle a natural tie (...)
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