1. Tracey Bretag & Margaret Green (forthcoming). The Role of Virtue Ethics Principles in Academic Integrity Breach Decision-Making. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-13.
    This paper contends that principles of virtue ethics have the potential to both supplement and complement academic integrity policy in the adjudication of undergraduate student academic integrity breaches. The paper uses elements of grounded theory to explore responses from 15 Academic Integrity Breach Decision Makers (AIBDMs) at an Australian university, and in particular, the process they use to determine outcomes for student breaches of academic integrity. The findings indicate that AIBDMs often use principles of virtue ethics to help provide nuanced (...)
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  2. Holly Randell-Moon, Nicole Anderson, Tracey Bretag, Anthony Burke, Sue Grieshaber, Anthony Lambert, David Saltmarsh & Nicola Yelland (2011). Journal Editing and Ethical Research Practice: Perspectives of Journal Editors. Ethics and Education 6 (3):225 - 238.
    This article offers perspectives from academics with recent journal editing experience on a range of ethical issues and dilemmas that regularly pose challenges for those in editorial roles. Each contributing author has provided commentary and reflection on a select topic that was identified in the research literature concerning academic publishing and journal editing. Topics discussed include the ethical responsibilities of working with international and early career contributors to develop work for publication, balancing influence and responsibility to a journal's disciplinary field (...)
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  3. Tracey Bretag & Saadia Mahmud (2009). Self-Plagiarism or Appropriate Textual Re-Use? Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):193-205.
    Self-plagiarism requires clear definition within an environment that places integrity at the heart of the research enterprise. This paper explores the whole notion of self-plagiarism by academics and distinguishes between appropriate and inappropriate textual re-use in academic publications, while considering research on other forms of plagiarism such as student plagiarism. Based on the practical experience of the authors in identifying academics’ self-plagiarism using both electronic detection and manual analysis, a simple model is proposed for identifying self-plagiarism by academics.
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