Search results for 'Traditional farming' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rajiv K. Sinha (1997). Embarking on the Second Green Revolution for Sustainable Agriculture in India: A Judicious Mix of Traditional Wisdom and Modern Knowledge in Ecological Farming. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (2):183-197.score: 144.0
    The Green Revolution in India which was heralded in the 1960‘s was a mixed blessing. Ambitious use of agro-chemicals boosted food production but also destroyed the agricultural ecosystem. Of late Indian farmers and agricultural scientists have realized this and are anxious to find alternatives – perhaps a non-chemical agriculture – and have even revived their age-old traditional techniques of natural farming. Scientists are working to find economically cheaper and ecologically safer alternatives to agro-chemicals. Blue-Green Algae Biofertilizers, Earthworm (...)
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  2. Sameer K. Alhamidi, Mats Gustafsson, Hans Larsson & Per Hillbur (2003). The Cultural Background of the Sustainability of the Traditional Farming System in the Ghouta the Oasis of Damascus, Syria. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):231-240.score: 114.0
    This paper discusses thepractical impact of a non-materialistic cultureon sustainable farm management.Two elements are discussed: first, how deeplyrooted religion is in this culture; second,the feasibility of using both human knowledgeand experience, so-called tradition and divineguidance in management. Finally, theimplications of the fusion of these twoelements are drawn. The outcome is thecapability of man to integrate ethical valuesinto decisions and actions. This integration,when applied by skilled farmers, leads to amanagement of natural resources in analtruistic fashion and not merely to economicends. Moreover, (...)
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  3. A. Arunachalam & K. Arunachalam (eds.) (2010). Natural Resources Management in North-East India: Linking Ecology, Economics & Ethics. Dvs Publishers.score: 90.0
    section 1. Natural resources management -- section 2. Biodiversity and ecosystems -- section 3. Traditional farming and its management -- section 4. Conservation and sustainable development.
     
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  4. Promila Sharma & Sucheta Singh (2008). Domestification of Medicinal Plants and Eco-Friendly Traditional Farming in Kumaon Hills: An Overview. In Kuruvila Pandikattu (ed.), Dancing to Diversity: Science-Religion Dialogue in India. Serials Publications. 135.score: 90.0
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  5. Birgit Boogaard, Bettina Bock, Simon Oosting, Johannes Wiskerke & Akke van der Zijpp (2011). Social Acceptance of Dairy Farming: The Ambivalence Between the Two Faces of Modernity. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):259-282.score: 54.0
    Society’s relationship with modern animal farming is an ambivalent one: on the one hand there is rising criticism about modern animal farming; on the other hand people appreciate certain aspects of it, such as increased food safety and low food prices. This ambivalence reflects the two faces of modernity: the negative (exploitation of nature and loss of traditions) and the positive (progress, convenience, and efficiency). This article draws on a national survey carried out in the Netherlands that aimed (...)
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  6. Peggy F. Barlett, Linda Lobao & Katherine Meyer (1999). Diversity in Attitudes Toward Farming and Patterns of Work Among Farm Women: A Regional Comparison. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (4):343-354.score: 46.0
    Attention to diversity in women's attitudes toward farming and in women's patterns of farm work activity expands our understanding of the linkage between agrarian structure, regional history, and the behavior and values of individual farm women. We combine several disciplinary and methodological approaches to reveal patterns in work and values in a Southern case and then verify the existence of similar patterns in the Midwest. Two divergent conceptions of women's relationship to farm and marital partnership were found in a (...)
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  7. Ryunosuke Kikuchi (2012). Captive Bears in Human–Animal Welfare Conflict: A Case Study of Bile Extraction on Asia's Bear Farms. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):55-77.score: 42.0
    Bear bile has long been used in the Asian traditional pharmacopoeia. Bear farming first started in China ~30 years ago in terms of reducing the number of poached bears and ensuring the supply of bear bile. Approximately 13,000 bears are today captivated on Asia’s bear farms: their teeth are broken and the claws are also pulled out for the sake of human safety; the bears are imprisoned in squeeze cages for years; and a catheter is daily inserted into (...)
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  8. Christine Leeb (2011). The Concept of Animal Welfare at the Interface Between Producers and Scientists: The Example of Organic Pig Farming. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):173-183.score: 42.0
    In organic farming animal welfare is one important aspect included in the internationally agreed organic principles of health, ecology, fairness and care (IFOAM 2006), reflecting expectation of consumers and farmers. The definition of organic animal welfare includes—besides traditional terms of animal welfare—‘regeneration’ and ‘naturalness’. Organic animal welfare assessment needs to reflect this and use complex parameters, include natural behaviour and a systemic view. Furthermore, various parties with seemingly conflicting interests are involved, causing ethical dilemmas, such as the use (...)
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  9. K. Boogaard Birgit, B. Bock Bettina, J. Oosting Simon, S. C. Wiskerke Johannes & J. der Zijpp Akkvane (forthcoming). Social Acceptance of Dairy Farming: The Ambivalence Between the Two Faces of Modernity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.score: 42.0
    Society’s relationship with modern animal farming is an ambivalent one: on the one hand there is rising criticism about modern animal farming; on the other hand people appreciate certain aspects of it, such as increased food safety and low food prices. This ambivalence reflects the two faces of modernity: the negative (exploitation of nature and loss of traditions) and the positive (progress, convenience, and efficiency). This article draws on a national survey carried out in the Netherlands that aimed (...)
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  10. Judith Carney (1991). Indigenous Soil and Water Management in Senegambian Rice Farming Systems. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):37-48.score: 42.0
    Considerable attention has focussed on the potential of indigenous agricultural knowledge for sustainable development. Drawing upon fieldwork on the soil and water management principles of rice farming systems in Senegambia, this paper examines the potential of the traditional system for a sustainable food security strategy. Problems with pumpirrigation are reviewed as well as previous efforts in swamp rice development. It is argued that sustainability depends on more than ecological factors and in particular, requires sensitivity to socio-economic parameters such (...)
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  11. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). Decent Conduct Toward Animals: A Traditional Approach. Teorema 18 (3):61-83.score: 42.0
    The Bishop of Questoriana has recently asked for a pontifical document ‘furnishing a doctrinal foundation of love and respect for life existing on the earth’. Mainstream moralists have urged, since the Axial Era, that it is human life that most demands love and respect. We realize and perfect our own humanity by recognizing humanity in every other, of whatever creed or race. Realizing that biological species are not natural kinds, more recent moralists have hoped to found moral decency either on (...)
     
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  12. K. Tybirk, H. F. Alrøe & P. Frederiksen (2004). Nature Quality in Organic Farming: A Conceptual Analysis of Considerations and Criteria in a European Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):249-274.score: 42.0
    Nature quality in relation to farming is a complex field. It involves different traditions and interests, different views of what nature is, and different ways of valuing nature. Furthermore there is a general lack of empirical data on many aspects of nature quality in the farmed landscape. In this paper we discuss nature quality from the perspective of organic farming, which has its own values and goals in relation to nature – the Ecologist View of Nature. This is (...)
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  13. Jesper Rasmussen, Vibeke Langer & Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe (2006). Bias in Peer Review of Organic Farming Grant Applications. Agriculture and Human Values 23 (2):181-188.score: 42.0
    Peer reviews of 84 organic farming grant applications from Sweden were analyzed to determine whether the reviewers’ affiliation to one of two types of agriculture (i.e., organic and conventional) influenced their reviews. Fifteen reviewers were divided into three groups: (1) scientists with experience in organic farming research; (2) scientists with no experience in organic farming research; and (3) users of organic farming research. The two groups of scientists assessed the societal relevance and scientific quality of the (...)
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  14. David A. Cleveland, Fred Bowannie Jr, Donald F. Eriacho, Andrew Laahty & Eric Perramond (1995). Zuni Farming and United States Government Policy: The Politics of Biological and Cultural Diversity in Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 12 (3):2-18.score: 42.0
    Indigenous Zuni farming, including cultural values, ecological and biological diversity, and land distribution and tenure, appears to have been quite productive and sustainable for at least 2000 before United States influence began in the later half of the 18th century. United States Government Indian agriculture policy has been based on assimilation of Indians and taking of their resources, and continues in more subtle ways today. At Zuni this policy has resulted in the degradation and loss of natural resources for (...)
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  15. Sheron L. Randolph & Rickie Sanders (1992). Female Farmers in the Rwandan Farming System: A Study of the Ruhengeri Prefecture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 9 (1):59-66.score: 42.0
    The purpose of this paper has been to focus on two aspects of development—agricultural production in the small central African country of Rwanda, and the role of 1890 Land-Grant institutions in international development. While a discussion of female farmers in the Ruhengeri Prefecture of Rwanda represents the primary focus of this paper, the second focus is the means by which this and other such research is possible. The findings from the Rwandan study are in keeping with those found in other (...)
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  16. Arindam Samaddar & Prabir Kumar Das (2008). Changes in Transition: Technology Adoption and Rice Farming in Two Indian Villages. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):541-553.score: 42.0
    The economic impacts of the Green Revolution have been studied widely, but not its social-cultural effects on different farming communities. The adoption of high yielding varieties (HYVs) of rice changed the nature of rice farming in the two West Bengal villages of Padulara and Naigachi. The villages present an interesting contrast of socio-economic and cultural change due to the differences in the level of adoption of agricultural technologies. This study documents the social and cultural impacts of agricultural technology (...)
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  17. Daniel Martin Varisco (1991). The Future of Terrace Farming in Yemen: A Development Dilemma. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):166-172.score: 42.0
    The country of Yemen, on the southwestern corner of the Arabian Peninsula, is one of the most extensively terraced areas in the world. There is a well-documented tradition of both dryland and irrigated farming over the past three millennia and much of the indigenous agricultural knowledge survives. Development efforts over the past two decades in the north of Yemen have focused on expansion of tubewell irrigation at the expense of the major land use on dryland terraces and traditional (...)
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  18. James R. Veteto (2008). The History and Survival of Traditional Heirloom Vegetable Varieties in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of Western North Carolina. Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):121-134.score: 42.0
    Southern Appalachia is unique among agroecological regions of the American South because of the diverse environmental conditions caused by its mountain ecology, the geographic and commercial isolation of the region, and the relative cultural autonomy of the people that live there. Those three criteria, combined with a rich agricultural history and the continuance of the homegardening tradition, make southern Appalachia an area of relatively high crop biodiversity in America. This study investigated the history and survival of traditional heirloom vegetable (...)
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  19. M. B. M. Bracke, K. H. De Greef & H. Hopster (2005). Qualitative Stakeholder Analysis for the Development of Sustainable Monitoring Systems for Farm Animal Welfare. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (1):27-56.score: 40.0
    Continued concern for animal welfare may be alleviated when welfare would be monitored on farms. Monitoring can be characterized as an information system where various stakeholders periodically exchange relevant information. Stakeholders include producers, consumers, retailers, the government, scientists, and others. Valuating animal welfare in the animal-product market chain is regarded as a key challenge to further improve the welfare of farm animals and information on the welfare of animals must, therefore, be assessed objectively, for instance, through monitoring. Interviews with Dutch (...)
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  20. Margaret Alston & Kerri Whittenbury (2013). Does Climatic Crisis in Australia's Food Bowl Create a Basis for Change in Agricultural Gender Relations? Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):115-128.score: 38.0
    An ongoing crisis in Australian agriculture resulting from climate crises including drought, decreasing irrigation water, more recent catastrophic flooding, and an uncertain policy environment is reshaping gender relations in the intimate sphere of the farm family. Drawing on research conducted in the Murray-Darling Basin area of Australia we ask the question: Does extreme hardship/climate crises change highly inequitable gender relations in agriculture? As farm income declines, Australian farm women are more likely to be working off farm for critical family income (...)
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  21. G. O. Anoliefo, O. S. Isikhuemhen & N. R. Ochije (2003). Environmental Implications of the Erosion of Cultural Taboo Practices in Awka-South Local Government Area of Anambra State, Nigeria: 1. Forests, Trees, and Water Resource Preservation. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (3):281-296.score: 36.0
    Cultural taboos and their sanctionshave helped to check abuse of the environmentat least among the local people. The disregardfor these traditional checks and balancesespecially among Christians has adverselyaffected their enforcement at this time. Theenvironment and culture preservation inAwka-South were investigated. The faithfulobservance of the traditional laws in the studyarea was attributed to the fact that Awka-Southarea had remained occupied by the same peoplefor centuries. The study showed that thepreserved forests and their shrines in Nibotown have largely remained intact. (...)
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  22. Jason Shaw Parker (2013). Integrating Culture and Community Into Environmental Policy: Community Tradition and Farm Size in Conservation Decision Making. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):159-178.score: 36.0
    Community research by anthropologists and sociologists details the effects that centralization of decision making has on local communities. As governance and regulation move toward global scales, conservation policy has devolved to the local levels, creating tensions in resource management and protection. Centralization without local participation can place communities at risk by eroding the environmental knowledge and decision making capacity of local people. Environmental problems such as water quality impairments require perception, interpretation, and ability to act locally. Through a presentation of (...)
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  23. Bert Theunissen (2008). Breeding Without Mendelism: Theory and Practice of Dairy Cattle Breeding in the Netherlands 1900-1950. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (4):637 - 676.score: 36.0
    In the 1940s and 1950s, Dutch scientists became increasingly critical of the practices of commercial dairy cattle breeders. Milk yields had hardly increased for decades, and the scientists believed this to be due to the fact that breeders still judged the hereditary potential of their animals on the basis of outward characteristics. An objective verdict on the qualities of breeding stock could only be obtained by progeny testing, the scientists contended: the best animals were those that produced the most productive (...)
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  24. Rafael Caballero (2009). Stakeholder Interactions in Castile-La Mancha, Spain's Cereal-Sheep System. Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):219-231.score: 36.0
    Large tracts of European rural land, mostly in the less favored areas (LFA), are devoted to low-inputs and large scale grazing systems (LSGS) with potential environmental and social functions. Although these LSGS may provide harbor for a good part of European nature values, their continuity is facing contrasting threats of intensification and abandonment. These areas, however, may be characterized by particular grazing structures and social dynamics of change that should be unveiled prior to attempts to devise rural development strategies or (...)
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  25. Mark Moritz (2010). Crop–Livestock Interactions in Agricultural and Pastoral Systems in West Africa. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):119-128.score: 36.0
    Driven by population pressures on natural resources, peri-urban pastoralists in the Far North Province of Cameroon have recently intensified livestock production in their traditional pastoral system by feeding their cattle cottonseed cakes and other agricultural byproducts to cope with the disappearance of rangelands typically available through the dry season. Although the crop–livestock interactions in this altered intensive pastoral system seem similar to alterations recently named in mixed-farming systems in West Africa, they are distinctly different and would require a (...)
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  26. Alfred Wolf (1987). Saving the Small Farm: Agriculture in Roman Literature. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 4 (2-3):65-75.score: 32.0
    Roman agriculture suffered traumatic changes during the 2nd century B.C. The traditional farmers who tilled their few acres and served family, gods and community were being squeezed out by large estate owners using slaves for investment farming. Politicians, scholars and poets tried to revive the ancestoral rustic life.In 133 B.C. the Gracchi legislated land reform to relieve the distress of the farmer soldiers who had won the empire. Although their efforts led to political confrontation that deteriorated into civil (...)
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  27. Emily Brady (2006). The Aesthetics of Agricultural Landscapes and the Relationship Between Humans and Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):1 – 19.score: 30.0
    The continuum between nature and artefact is occupied by objects and environments that embody a relationship between natural processes and human activity. In this paper, I explore the relationship that emerges through human interaction with the land in the generation and aesthetic appreciation of industrial farming in contrast to more traditional agricultural practices. I consider the concept of a dialectical relationship and develop it in order to characterise the distinctive synthesising activity of humans and nature which underlies cultivated (...)
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  28. Stuart Rachels, Essays by Stuart Rachels.score: 30.0
    Over the last fifty years, traditional farming has been replaced by industrial farming. Unlike traditional farming, industrial farming is abhorrently cruel to animals, environmentally destructive, awful for rural America, and wretched for human health. In this essay, I document those facts, explain why the industrial system has become dominant, and argue that we should boycott industrially produced meat. Also, I argue that we should not even kill animals humanely for food, given our uncertainty about (...)
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  29. Jeffrey Burkhardt (1988). Crisis, Argument, and Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (2):123-138.score: 30.0
    Scholarly critics such as Wendell Berry, as well as the popular media, frequently refer to problems associated with agriculture as the agricultural crisis or the farm crisis. Despite the identification of a problem or problems as symptomatic of this crisis, scant attention is paid to why the situation is a social crisis as opposed to a problem, tragedy, trend, or simple change in the structure of agriculture. This paper analyzes the use of social crisis as applied to the state of (...)
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  30. Carolin Demuth (2013). Handling Power-Asymmetry in Interactions with Infants: A Comparative Socio-Cultural Perspective. Interaction Studies 14 (2):212-239.score: 30.0
    Interaction between adults and infants by nature constitutes a strong powerasymmetry relationship. Based on the assumption that communicative practices with infants are inseparably intertwined with broader cultural ideologies of good child care, this paper will contrast how parents in two distinct socio-cultural communities deal with power asymmetry in interactions with 3-months old infants. The study consists of a microanalysis of videotaped free play mother-infant interactions from 20 middle class families in Muenster, Germany and 20 traditional farming Nso families (...)
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  31. Abe Goldman (1991). Tradition and Change in Postharvest Pest Management in Kenya. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):99-113.score: 30.0
    The hazard of postharvest pest losses is ubiquitous in peasant farming systems; as a result, farmers invariably have some response to the threat of these losses. Responses to postharvest pests may be more extensive than to field pests, even when, by statistical measures, the usual levels of losses are comparable. In studies of pest management practices in three contrasting areas in Kenya, it was found that farmers virtually always rely on an array of techniques and strategies, usually including both (...)
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  32. Sam L. J. Page & Helán E. Page (1991). Western Hegemony Over African Agriculture in Southern Rhodesia and its Continuing Threat to Food Security in Independent Zimbabwe. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (4):3-18.score: 30.0
    Zimbabwe's communal farmers are now less food secure than they were two generations ago. The roots of this decline lie not only in the confinement of Africans to marginal land but also in the historic forced replacement of their sustainable, indigenous farming system with one whose productivity now relies on the use of large amounts of expensive chemical inputs. Environmentally-friendly, traditional farming practices such as pyro-culture, minimum tillage, mixed cropping, and bush fallowing were completely wiped out and (...)
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  33. J. Sousa Silva (1988). The Contradictions of the Biorevolution for the Development of Agriculture in the Third World: Biotechnology and Capitalist Interest. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):61-70.score: 30.0
    All biotechnology-related promises are based upon its technological potential; yet, many of these promises assure the solution for chronic socio-economic problems in the Third World through a new technological revolution in agriculture. The forecasting is that such a revolution will start delivering its most profound impact early in the 21st century. However, 11 years before the year 2000, a critical analysis of its promises against its current trends indicates that the future use and impact of biotechnology in the Third World (...)
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  34. Cristian Timmermann, Henk van den Belt & Michiel Korthals (eds.) (2010). Climate-Ready GM Crops, Intellectual Property and Global Justice. Wageningen Academic Publishers.score: 30.0
    So-called climate-ready GM crops can be of great help in adapting to a changing climate. Climate change, caused in great part by anthropogenic greenhouse gases released in the atmosphere since the industrial revolution by the developed world, is felt much stronger in the developing world, causing unexpected droughts and floods that will cause large harvest loss, leading to more hunger and malnutrition, rising death tolls and disease vulnerability. The current intellectual property regime (IPR) strikes an unfair balance between profit oriented (...)
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  35. Marta G. Rivera-Ferre (2009). Can Export-Oriented Aquaculture in Developing Countries Be Sustainable and Promote Sustainable Development? The Shrimp Case. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):301-321.score: 24.0
    Industrial shrimp farming has been promoted by international development and financial institutions in coastal indebted poor countries as a way to obtain foreign exchange earnings, reimburse external debt, and promote development. The promotion of the shrimp industry is a clear example of a more general trend of support of export-oriented primary products, consisting in monocultures of commodities, as opposed to the promotion of more diverse, traditional production directed to feed the local population. In general, it is assumed that (...)
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  36. Mark Battersby & Sharon Bailin (2010). Beyond the Boundaries: Critical Thinking and Differing Cultural Perspectives. Ethics and Education 4 (2):189-200.score: 24.0
    After outlining arguments for the general epistemological presumption in favour of taking into consideration alternative perspectives from other cultures, the article details several examples in which such an examination yields epistemic benefits and challenges. First, our example of alternative conceptions of art demonstrates that a western conception of art as disinterested contemplation cannot be accepted as a general characterization in that it does not adequately characterize the practice of many traditional societies. Second, the case of aboriginal justice reveals assumptions (...)
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  37. Vikram S. Negi & R. K. Maikhuri (2013). Socio-Ecological and Religious Perspective of Agrobiodiversity Conservation: Issues, Concern and Priority for Sustainable Agriculture, Central Himalaya. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):491-512.score: 24.0
    A large section of the population (70%) of Uttarakhand largely depends upon agricultural based activities for their livelihood. Rural community of the mountains has developed several indigenous and traditional methods of farming to conserve the crop diversity and rejoice agrodiversity with religious and cultural vehemence. Traditional food items are prepared during occasion, festivals, weddings, and other religious rituals from diversified agrodiversity are a mean to maintain agrodiversity in the agriculture system. Agrodiversity is an insurance against disease and (...)
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  38. Sarah Ebenreck (1983). A Partnership Farmland Ethic. Environmental Ethics 5 (1):33-45.score: 24.0
    Current facts about soil erosion, groundwater “mining,” and impact of toxic substances suggest a resource crisis in our farming system. Yet traditional checks on the exploitation of farmland, capsulized in the “stewardship ethic,” proceed from too limited a viewpoint to adequately address the root of the exploitation and proffer an alternative. After briefly examining the stewardship ethic, I consider the developmentof a “partnership ethic” to guide the use of land for farming which builds its essential elements out (...)
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  39. Sharon Bailin & Mark Battersby (2010). Beyond the Boundaries: Critical Thinking and Differing Cultural Perspectives. Ethics and Education 4 (2):189-200.score: 24.0
    After outlining arguments for the general epistemological presumption in favour of taking into consideration alternative perspectives from other cultures, the article details several examples in which such an examination yields epistemic benefits and challenges. First, our example of alternative conceptions of art demonstrates that a western conception of art as disinterested contemplation cannot be accepted as a general characterization in that it does not adequately characterize the practice of many traditional societies. Second, the case of aboriginal justice reveals assumptions (...)
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  40. Lawrence Cahoone (2009). Hunting as a Moral Good. Environmental Values 18 (1):67 - 89.score: 24.0
    I argue that hunting is not a sport, but a neo-traditional cultural trophic practice consistent with ecological ethics, including a meliorist concern for animal rights or welfare. Death by hunter is on average less painful than death in wild nature. Hunting achieves goods, including trophic responsibility, ecological expertise and a unique experience of animal inter-dependence. Hunting must then be not only permissible but morally good wherever: a) preservation of ecosystems or species requires hunting as a wildlife management tool; and/or (...)
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  41. Pablo Torres-Lima, Beatriz Canabal-Cristiani & Gilberto Burela-Rueda (1994). Urban Sustainable Agriculture: The Paradox of the Chinampa System in Mexico City. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 11 (1):37-46.score: 24.0
    Although the chinampa agriculture in Mexico City is considered an historical sustainable farming system,there have been few studies on its current status. This paper assesses the relationship between agroecological factors and socioeconomic strategies by analyzing urban forces, regional employment, and environmental concerns. Despite ecological deterioration caused by the urban expansion of Mexico City, the economic viability of this agricultural system is still based on the efficient use of farming technologies and resources management strategies that tend to maintain levels (...)
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  42. Christopher N. Hunte (1992). The African American Experience in Agriculture. Agriculture and Human Values 9 (1):11-14.score: 24.0
    Shrinking enrollments in the agricultural programs of the 1890 schools can be partly explained by negative attitudes of Blacks toward agriculture. This attitude has roots in the historical experiences of African Americans and has negative implications for the agricultural programs of the 1890 schools. A collection of data from a sample of Black Louisiana Farmers lends credence to the claim that Black Farmers are not encouraging their children to go into farming. To counter the impact on the 1890 schools, (...)
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  43. M. S. Lesney & V. B. Smocovitis (1994). Assessing the Human Genome Project: Effects on World Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 11 (1):10-18.score: 24.0
    The Human Genome Project is the attempt to sequence the complement of human DNA. Its ultimate purpose is to understand and control human genetics. The social and ethical concerns raised by this attempt have been much debated, especially fears concerning human genetic engineering and eugenics. An almost completely neglected aspect of the genome project's potential effects is its impact on world agriculture. The Human Genome Project will provide source information to transform commercially and therapeutically valuable segments of the human genetic (...)
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  44. Amy Trauger, Carolyn Sachs, Mary Barbercheck, Kathy Brasier & Nancy Ellen Kiernan (2010). “Our Market is Our Community”: Women Farmers and Civic Agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):43-55.score: 24.0
    Civic agriculture is characterized in the literature as complementary and embedded social and economic strategies that provide economic benefits to farmers at the same time that they ostensibly provide socio-environmental benefits to the community. This paper presents some ways in which women farmers practice civic agriculture. The data come from in-depth interviews with women practicing agriculture in Pennsylvania. Some of the strategies women farmers use to make a living from the farm have little to do with food or agricultural products, (...)
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  45. Bruce J. Horwith, Phyllis N. Windle, Edward F. MacDonald, J. Kathy Parker, Allen M. Ruby & Chris Elfring (1989). The Role of Technology in Enhancing Low Resource Agriculture in Africa. Agriculture and Human Values 6 (3):68-84.score: 24.0
    Traditional forms of farming, herding, and fishing are remarkably adapted to African conditions but these traditional approaches are being overtaken by modern pressures, particularly population growth. According to a report published by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), a nonpartisan analytical support agency of the U. S. Congress, one promising way to help African farmers and herders would be for development assistance organizations to focus more attention on the various forms of low-resource agriculture that predominate in Africa.In (...)
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  46. Rod MacRae (1999). Not Just What, but How: Creating Agricultural Sustainability and Food Security by Changing Canada's Agricultural Policy Making Process. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):187-202.score: 24.0
    Agriculture has been enormously productive in recent decades. The main problem is that fragmentation of issues, knowledge, and responsibilities has hidden the costs associated with this success. These are mainly environmental, social, and health costs, which have been assigned to other ministries, with their own histories unconnected to agriculture. Now that agricultural policy has achieved its success, its costs are becoming apparent. The current system is preoccupied with traditional views of competitiveness and efficiency. Policies, programs, and regulations are organized (...)
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  47. Joseph J. Molnar & Curtis M. Jolly (1988). Technology Transfer: Institutions, Models, and Impacts on Agriculture and Rural Life in the Developing World. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 5 (1-2):16-23.score: 24.0
    Technology transfer is a multi-level process of communication involving a variety of senders and receivers of ideas and materials. As a response to market failure, or as an effort to accelerate market-driven social change, technology transfer may combine public and private aparatus or rely solely on public institutional mechanisms to identify, develop, and deliver innovations and information. Technology transfer institutions include universities, government ministries, research institutes, and what may be termed the ‘project sector’. Four farm- and village-level change models are (...)
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  48. Andrew Nash (1997). Wine-Farming, Heresy Trials and The'whole Personality': The Emergence of the Stellenbosch Philosophical Tradition, 1916-40. [REVIEW] South African Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):55-65.score: 24.0
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  49. Ulrich Nitsch (1988). The Legitimacy of the Agricultural Extension Service. Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):50-56.score: 24.0
    Traditionally, the Swedish Agricultural Extension Service has delivered technical information to farmers with the aim of increasing productivity and efficiency in farming. Present problems with overproduction of food and the negative social and environmental consequences of present farm practices has brought this traditional mission in question. In a situation of budgetary constraints it has been suggested that the funding of the governmental Agricultural Extension Service should be cut down or even discontinued altogetherThe article argues that this would be (...)
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  50. Colin J. Pilbeam, Sudarshan B. Mathema, Peter J. Gregory & Padma B. Shakya (2005). Soil Fertility Management in the Mid-Hills of Nepal: Practices and Perceptions. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):243-258.score: 24.0
    Sustaining soil fertility is essential to the prosperity of many households in the mid-hills of Nepal, but there are concerns that the breakdown of the traditional linkages between forest, livestock, and cropping systems is adversely affecting fertility. This study used triangulated data from surveys of households, discussion groups, and key informants in 16 wards in eastern and western Nepal to determine the existing practices for soil fertility management, the extent of such practices, and the perception of the direction of (...)
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