Search results for 'Transcendence (Philosophy) in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Regina M. Schwartz (ed.) (2004). Transcendence: Philosophy, Literature, and Theology Approach the Beyond. Routledge.score: 1026.0
    In Transcendence , thinkers from John Milbank, Graham Ward, and Kevin Hart, to Thomas Carlson, Slavoj Zizek, and Jean-Luc Marion have come together to create the definitive analysis of this key concept in modern theological and philosophical thought.
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  2. Phyllis Carey (ed.) (1997). Wagering on Transcendence: The Search for Meaning in Literature. Sheed & Ward.score: 990.0
    Through essays, Mount Mary College professors from various disciplines analyze several pieces of literature from a variety of genres and authors to show how ...
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  3. Joakim Sigvardson (2002). Immanence and Transcendence in Thomas Pynchon's Mason & Dixon: A Phenomenological Study. Almquist & Wiksell International.score: 648.0
     
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  4. A. Lichtigfeld (1953). Jaspers' Concept of Transcendence (God) in Recent Literature. Philosophy 28 (106):255 - 259.score: 582.0
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  5. Shiling Xiang (2010). Inquiry Into the Transcendence of Tang Dynasty Confucians to Han Dynasty Confucians and the Transformation of Traditional Confucianism in Terms of Lunyu Bijie. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):471-485.score: 426.0
    Neo-Confucianism of the Han and Tang dynasties is an indispensable part of the history of Chinese philosophy. From Han dynasty Confucians to Tang dynasty Confucians, the study of Confucian classics evolved progressively from textual research to conceptual explanation. A significant sign of this transformation is the book Lunyu Bijie 论语笔解 (A Written Explanation of the Analects), co-authored by Han Yu and Li Ao. Making use of the tremendous room for interpretation within the Analects, the book studied and reorganized the relationship (...)
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  6. Bo Gustavsson (2010). Det Stora Okända: Kulturkritiska Essäer. Brutus Östlings Bokförlag Symposium.score: 408.0
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  7. Xiang Shiling (2010). Inquiry Into the Transcendence of Tang Dynasty Confucians to Han Dynasty Confucians and the Transformation of Traditional Confucianism in Terms of Lunyu Bijie. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):471-485.score: 318.0
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  8. Robert A. Martin (1977). The Romantic Sublime: Studies in the Structure and Psychology of Transcendence (Review). Philosophy and Literature 1 (3):360-361.score: 294.0
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  9. Mark Richard McCulloh (2006). Destruction and Transcendence in W. G. Sebald. Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):395-409.score: 294.0
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  10. Terryl L. Givens (2009). When Souls Had Wings: Pre-Mortal Existence in Western Thought. OUP USA.score: 252.0
    The idea of the pre-existence of the soul has been extremely important, widespread, and persistent throughout Western history - from even before the philosophy of Plato to the poetry of Robert Frost. When Souls Had Wings offers the first systematic history of this little explored feature of Western culture. Terryl Givens describes the tradition of pre-existence as "pre-heaven"--the place where unborn souls wait until they descend to earth to be born. And typically it is seen as a descent--a falling away (...)
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  11. Linnell Secomb (1999). Beauvoir’s Minoritarian Philosophy. Hypatia 14 (4):96-113.score: 252.0
    : Drawing on Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's elaborations of the project of philosophy and styles of minoritarian literature, it becomes possible to reveal new dimensions in Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex. In this work she uses a minoritarian philosophy, which is an accessible and collaborative mode of philosophizing, to create a concept of Woman as an incarnate-becoming. This concept overcomes the dichotomizing of transcendence and immanence, and revalues feminine existence within philosophical discourses.
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  12. Canan Şavkay (2013). Ethics and the Third Party in Iris Murdoch's The Green Knight. Philosophy and Literature 36 (2):347-362.score: 222.0
    Arguing that he wants to achieve a better understanding of the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, C. Fred Alford in his article “Emmanuel Levinas and Iris Murdoch: Ethics as Exit?” compares Levinas’s ideas with those of Iris Murdoch and concludes that the major difference between the two philosophers consists in their attitude toward everyday reality. Alford claims that although both philosophers are concerned with one’s relation with the other person, Levinas is “never interested in the concrete reality of the other person, (...)
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  13. Phil Oliver (2001). William James's "Springs of Delight": The Return to Life. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 216.0
    This enterprising book, written in the spirit of William James, urges our appreciation of the intensely personal character of spiritual transcendence. Phil Oliver's work has important implications for specialists concerned with the Jamesian concept of "pure experience," and it illuminates significant interdisciplinary ties among philosophy, literature, and other intellectual domains.
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  14. A. Larson (2003). Gatsby and Us. Critical Horizons 4 (2):281-303.score: 192.0
    What are the practical uses of literature and how can philosophy help in determining these uses? This article attempts to answer these questions by examining Gilles Deleuze's application of Spinoza's ontology in a philosophy of immanence. This examination is carried out through a close and practical reading of F.Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. By showing how Fitzgerald's text invites a double reading, one of both transcendence and immanence, the practical consequences for literature and philosophy are revealed in (...)
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  15. Gary J. Shipley & Nicola Masciandaro (2012). Open Commentary to Eugene Thacker's" Cosmic Pessimism". Continent 2 (2):76-81.score: 192.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 76–81 Comments on Eugene Thacker’s “Cosmic Pessimism” Nicola Masciandaro Anything you look forward to will destroy you, as it already has. —Vernon Howard In pessimism, the first axiom is a long, low, funereal sigh. The cosmicity of the sigh resides in its profound negative singularity. Moving via endless auto-releasement, it achieves the remote. “ Oltre la spera che piú larga gira / passa ’l sospiro ch’esce del mio core ” [Beyond the sphere that circles widest / penetrates (...)
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  16. Mervyn Hartwig & Jamie Morgan (eds.) (2012). Critical Realism and Spirituality: Theism, Atheism, and Meta-Reality / Edited by Mervyn Hartwig and Jamie Morgan. Routledge.score: 192.0
    The rise of neo-integrative worldviews : towards a rational spirituality for the coming planetary civilization -- Beyond fundamentalism : spiritual realism, spiritual literacy and education -- Realism, literature and spirituality -- Judgemental rationality and the equivalence of argument : realism about God, response to Morgan's critique -- Transcendence and God : reflections on critical realism, the "new atheism", and Christian theology -- Human sciences at the edge of panentheism : God and the limits of ontological realism -- Beyond (...)
     
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  17. Edward K. Kaplan (1972). Gaston Bachelard's Philosophy of Imagination: An Introduction. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (1):1-24.score: 186.0
    A psychology, Phenomenology and ontology of creativity developed by this french epistemologist and historian of science (1884-1962) are systematically described. Starting from analysis of image networks in literature, Bachelard presents imagination as autonomous, A power of human transcendence, A force preceding perception and memory. He ultimately surpasses psychological reductionism. Imagination of form is inferior to imagination of matter (depth); yet they both are secondary to dynamic imagination. Bachelard's fundamental method is a phenomenological study of images as origins of (...)
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  18. Daniel M. Hausman (1984). Philosophy and Economic Methodology. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:231 - 249.score: 180.0
    This paper is concerned with the puzzling divorce that exists between writing on economic methodology and work by philosophers of science. After documenting the extent and nature of the separation and making some disparaging comments about the quality of much of the literature on economic methodology, this essay argues that the divorce results from the differences between the aims of philosophers of science, who are concerned to learn about knowledge acquisition in disciplines such as economics, and the more immediately (...)
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  19. Simon Critchley (2004). Very Little-- Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. Routledge.score: 152.0
    Very Little ... Almost Nothing puts the question of the meaning of life back at the center of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. A profound but secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett, in many ways the hero of the book. For this Second (...)
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  20. Michael Fagenblat (2002). Il Y a du Quotidien: Levinas and Heidegger on the Self. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (5):578-604.score: 120.0
    Levinas's notion of il y a (there is) existence is shown to be the organizing principle behind his challenge to Being and Time. The two main aspects of that challenge propose an ontology that is not entirely reduced to being-in-the-world and a correlative account of the self that is not entirely reduced to context. In that way Levinas attempts first to restore unconditional value to the self and then to 'produce' a pluralist social ontology based on the independence of persons. (...)
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  21. Kris Sealey (2013). The 'Face' of the Il y A: Levinas and Blanchot on Impersonal Existence. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):431-448.score: 120.0
    This essay argues for a reading of Levinas’ work which prioritizes the significance of the il y a over the personal Other. I buttress this reading by using the well-documented intersections between Levinas’ work and that of Maurice Blanchot. Said otherwise, I argue that Levinas’ relationship with Blanchot (a relationship that is very much across the notion of the il y a) calls scholars of the Levinasian corpus to place the conception of impersonal existence to the forefront. To do so (...)
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  22. Joseph F. Graham (1992). Onomatopoetics: Theory of Language and Literature. Cambridge University Press.score: 116.0
    The relationship of words to the things they represent and to the mind that forms them has long been the subject of linguistic enquiry. Joseph Graham's challenging book takes this debate into the field of literary theory, making a searching enquiry into the nature of literary representation. It reviews the arguments of Plato's Cratylus on how words signify things, and of Chomsky's theory of the innate "natural" status of language (contrasted with Saussure's notion of its essential arbitrariness). In the process, (...)
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  23. Nikky-Guninder Kaur Singh (1993). The Feminine Principle in the Sikh Vision of the Transcendent. Cambridge University Press.score: 116.0
    A critical interpretation of Sikh literature from a feminist perspective.
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  24. Steven Shankman (2010). Other Others: Levinas, Literature, Transcultural Studies. State University of New York Press.score: 114.0
    The promise of language in the depths of hell: Primo Levi's Canto of Ulysses and Inferno -- The difference between difference and otherness: Il milione of Marco Polo and Calvino's Le città invisibili -- Traces of the Confucian/Mencian other: ethical moments in Sima Qian's Records of the historian -- War and the Hellenic splendor of knowing: Euripides, Hölderlin, Celan -- The saying, the said, and the betrayal of mercy in Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice -- Nom de dieu, quelle race: the (...)
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  25. Nigel Rapport (1997). Transcendent Individual: Towards a Literary and Liberal Anthropology. Routledge.score: 112.0
    Transcendent Individual is an anthropological account of individual creativity and its conscious engagement in society. Drawing widely on ethnographic and theoretic material, and bringing into debate a range of voices--Nietzsche, Wilde and Forster, Bateson and Gerald Edelman, George Steiner, Richard Rorty and John Berger, Edmund Leach and Anthony Cohen--the book approaches individuality in terms of a range of issues: biological integrity, consciousness, agency, democracy, discourse, knowledge, consumerism, globalism and play.
     
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  26. Anne Hawkins (1984). Two Pathographies: A Study in Illness and Literature. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (3):231-252.score: 100.0
    This study compares two autobiographical descriptions of illness – the seventeenth-century John Donne's Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and the twentieth-century Cornelius and Kathryn Ryan's A Private Battle . I begin by identifying the basic structure in both narratives as parallel to that of the case history, and then show how each individual's experience is shaped by the conditions of illness appropriate to their respective cultures. Lastly, I discuss the way in which both authors understand and represent sickness, as well as (...)
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  27. John D. Lyons (2005). Before Imagination: Embodied Thought From Montaigne to Rousseau. Stanford University Press.score: 92.0
    Before imagination became the transcendent and creative faculty promoted by the Romantics, it was for something quite different. Not reserved to a privileged few, imagination was instead considered a universal ability that each person could direct in practical ways. To imagine something meant to form in the mind a replica of a thing—its taste, its sound, and other physical attributes. At the end of the Renaissance, there was a movement to encourage individuals to develop their ability to imagine vividly. Within (...)
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  28. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 86.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  29. Jennifer Anna Gosetti (2002). Tragedy and Truth in Heidegger and Jaspers. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):301-314.score: 86.0
    In this essay, I aim to engage Martin Heidegger’s and Karl Jaspers’s views of the tragic in critical dialogue in order to show that for both of these philosophers tragedy, in literature and in its philosophical interpretation, defines the relationships of thought to transcendence, of history to truth, I begin with an account of Jaspers’s treatment of the tragic, proceed to interpret Heidegger’s account of tragic poetry and his post-tragic notion of Gelassenheit, and finally outline the limitations of (...)
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  30. Yu-lin Lee (2013). Translating Deleuze: On the Uses of Deleuze in a Non-Western Context. Deleuze Studies 7 (3):319-329.score: 86.0
    This paper aims to explore the appropriation of Deleuzian literary theory in the Chinese context and its potential for mapping a new global poetics. The purpose of this treatment is thus twofold: first, it will redefine the East–West literary relationship, and second, it will seek a new ethics of life, as endorsed by Deleuze's philosophy of immanence. One finds an affinity between literature and life in Deleuze's philosophy: in short, literature appears as the passage of life and an (...)
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  31. Lilian Alweiss (2008). Søren Overgaard, Husserl and Heidegger on Being in the World. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 24 (1):65-71.score: 84.0
    It is a study of the phenomenological philosophies of Husserl and Heidegger. Through a critical discussion including practically all previously published English and German literature on the subject, the aim is to present a thorough and evenhanded account of the relation between the two. The book provides a detailed presentation of their respective projects and methods, and examines several of their key phenomenological analyses, centering on the phenomenon of being-in-the-world. It offers new perspectives on Husserlian and Heideggerian phenomenology, e.g. (...)
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  32. Ronny Miron (2004). From Opposition to Reciprocity: Karl Jaspers on Science, Philosophy and What Lies Between Them. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):147-163.score: 84.0
    This article deals with the relationship between philosophy and science in the writings of Karl Jaspers and with its reception in the wider scholarly literature. The problem discussed is how to characterize the relationship that exists between science—defined on pure Kantian grounds as a universally valid knowledge of phenomenal objects—and philosophy—conceived by Jaspers as the transcending mode of thinking of personal Existenz rising towards the totality and unity of Being. Two solutions to that problem arise from Jaspers’s writings. The (...)
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  33. Søren Overgaard (2004). Husserl and Heidegger on Being in the World. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 84.0
    It is a study of the phenomenological philosophies of Husserl and Heidegger. Through a critical discussion including practically all previously published English and German literature on the subject, the aim is to present a thorough and evenhanded account of the relation between the two. The book provides a detailed presentation of their respective projects and methods, and examines several of their key phenomenological analyses, centering on the phenomenon of being-in-the-world. It offers new perspectives on Husserlian and Heideggerian phenomenology, e.g. (...)
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  34. Shyam Ranganathan (2011). An Archimedean Point for Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):479-519.score: 84.0
    According to the orthodox account of meaning and translation in the literature, meaning is a property of expressions of a language, and translation is a matching of synonymous expressions across languages. This linguistic account of translation gives rise to well-known skeptical conclusions about translation, objectivity, meaning and truth, but it does not conform to our best translational practices. In contrast, I argue for a textual account of meaning based on the concept of a TEXT-TYPE that does conform to our (...)
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  35. Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen (2012). Autonomy and Objectivity of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (3):309-334.score: 80.0
    This article deals with the problematic concepts of the rational and the social, which have been typically seen as dichotomous in the history and philosophy of science literature. I argue that this view is mistaken and that the social can be seen as something that enables rationality in science, and further, that a scientific community as well as an individual can be taken as an epistemic subject. Furthermore, I consider how scientific communities could be seen as freely acting and (...)
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  36. Donald E. Hall (2009). Reading Sexualities: Hermeneutic Theory and the Future of Queer Studies. Routledge.score: 80.0
    Sexual hermeneutics -- Desirably queer futures -- Transcending the self -- Global conversations -- Radical sexuality and ethical responsibility -- Conclusion. How sex changes.
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  37. Paul C. Vitz & Susan M. Felch (eds.) (2006). The Self: Beyond the Postmodern Crisis. Isi Books.score: 74.0
    The peculiar dilemma of the self in our era has been noted by a wide range of writers, even as they have emphasized different aspects of that dilemma, such as the self’s alienation, disorientation, inflation, or fragmentation. In The Self: Beyond the Postmodern Crisis, Paul C. Vitz and Susan M. Felch bring together scholars from the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, theology, literature, biology, and physics to address the inadequacies of modern and postmodern selves and, ultimately, to suggest what an (...)
     
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  38. William Joseph FitzPatrick (2000). Teleology and the Norms of Nature. Garland Pub..score: 64.0
    This work is an examination of teleological attributions (i.e. ascriptions of proper functions and natural ends) to the features and behavior of living things, with a view ultimately to understanding their application to human life and the significance they may or may not have for an understanding of human nature and values. The author argues that such teleological attributions do indeed apply to living things, including human beings, and that this sheds substantial light on what living things are; interestingly, it (...)
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  39. Francisco J. Ayala (2003). Intelligent Design: The Original Version. Theology and Science 1 (1):9-32.score: 64.0
    William Paley ( Natural Theology , 1802) developed the argument-from-design. The complex structure of the human eye evinces that it was designed by an intelligent Creator. The argument is based on the irreducible complexity ("relation") of multiple interacting parts, all necessary for function. Paley adduces a wealth of biological examples leading to the same conclusion; his knowledge of the biology of his time was profound and extensive. Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species is an extended argument demonstrating that the "design" of (...)
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  40. Patrick Slattery (2006). Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era. Routledge.score: 64.0
    Curriculum Development in the Postmodern Era provided the first introduction and analysis of contemporary concepts of curriculum development in relation to postmodernism. It challenged educators to transcend purely traditional approaches to curriculum development and instead incorporate various postmodern discourses into their reflection and action in schools. Since publication in 1995, the curriculum studies field has exploded, the very notion of the postmodern has shifted, and the landscape of American schooling has changed dramatically-federal policies like No Child Left Behind have dramatically (...)
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  41. Grant Hamilton (2011). On Representation: Deleuze and Coetzee on the Colonized Subject. Editions Rodopi.score: 64.0
    In this important new study, Hamilton establishes and develops innovative links between the sites of postcolonial literary theory, the fiction of the South African/Australian academic and Nobel Prize-winning writer J.M. Coetzee, and the work of the French poststructuralist philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Centering on the key postcolonial problematic of representation, Hamilton argues that if one approaches the colonial subject through Gilles Deleuze’s rewriting of subjectivity, then a transcendent configuration of the colonial subject is revealed. Importantly, it is this rendition of the (...)
     
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  42. Janet Landman (1994). Regret: The Persistence of the Possible. OUP USA.score: 64.0
    "We are a people who do not want to keep much of the past in our heads," Lillian Hellman once wrote. "It is considered unhealthy in America to remember mistakes, neurotic to think about them, psychotic to dwell upon them". Yet who in their lifetime has never regretted a lost love, a missed opportunity, a path not taken? Indeed, regret is perhaps a universal experience, but while poets and novelists have long explored its complexities, very little has been written from (...)
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  43. John D. Norton, Canadian Journal of Philosophy.score: 56.0
    Whatever the original intent, the introduction of the term 'thought experiment' has proved to be one of the great public relations coups of science writing, For generations of readers of scientific literature, the term has planted the seed of hope that the fragment of text they have just read is more than mundane. Because it was a thought experiment, does it not tap into that infallible font of all wisdom in empiricist science, the experiment? And because it was conducted (...)
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  44. Linda Simon (2004). William James's Lost Souls in Ursula le Guin's Utopia. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):89-102.score: 54.0
    : Ursula Le Guin's "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" (1973), a staple of short fiction anthologies, was inspired by James's "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life." In Le Guin's moral tale, a devastating bargain causes some citizens of Omelas to reject their apparently utopian community. Although critics have seen this rejection as a Jamesian act of pragmatism and free will, this essay examines the story in the context of "The Moral Philosopher" and other writings by James on (...)
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  45. Roe Sybylla (2004). Down to Earth with Nietzsche: The Ethical Effects of Attitudes Toward Time and Body. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (3):309-328.score: 52.0
    This paper is about the effects on people''s lives of their attitudes towards time and their own embodiment. People commonly see time as biform; there is the time of bodily life and the eternal time which transcends mortal life. This division is deeply implicated in the dualistic values that pervade western thought. So, when Nietzsche substitutes a monist notion of time, he profoundly unsettles our cherished values (which, of course, are gendered). Nietzsche''s major thrust, I argue, is to elucidate and (...)
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  46. Mario C. Mapote (2013). Christ, the Perfection of Man: A Philosophical-Christological Approach on Christian Anthropology. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).score: 52.0
    The study began with an introduction to Philosophy of Man. This Philosophical-Christological approach started with sense of self-awareness on this seemingly vain technological modern world. In the history of philosophy, there were three objects of study evolving by themselves, world, man and God in orderly fashion and repeating in interval phases. Self-experience shows three objects: first, existential unity (past), second, experiential unity (present) and third, transcendental unity (future). Western Philosophy banked on Aristotle’s notion of man as rational animal that led (...)
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  47. Friedrich Nietzsche (1911/1999). Thus Spake Zarathustra. Dover Publications.score: 48.0
    A 19th-century literary masterpiece, tremendously influential in the arts and in philosophy, uses the Persian religious leader Zarathustra to voice the author’s views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the Ubermensch, or "superman," a term later perverted by Nazi propagandists. A passionate, quasi-biblical style is employed to inspire readers to become more than they have been and to transcend the limitations of conventional morality. A provocative work that remains a fixture of college reading lists.
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  48. George Steiner (1986). Real Presences: The Leslie Stephen Memorial Lecture, Delivered Before the University of Cambridge on 1 November 1985. Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge.score: 44.0
    Professor Steiner addresses the debate between deconstructionism - the 'anarchic' tendency to suppose that 'there are no rational or falsifiable decision-procedures as between a multitude of differing interpretations' of literature - and the established tradition of liberal criticism, which interprets by consensus, by common sense, and by 'a robust and fertile pragmatism'. He argues that if the acts of reading and of aesthetic judgement are to become responsible again to the vital mystery of literature and the arts they (...)
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  49. Samantha Vice (2003). Literature and the Narrative Self. Philosophy 78 (1):93-108.score: 40.0
    Claims that the self and experience in general are narrative in structure are increasingly common, but it is not always clear what such claims come down to. In this paper, I argue that if the view is to be distinctive, the element of narrativity must be taken as literally as possible. If we do so, and explore the consequences of thinking about our selves and our lives in this manner, we shall see that the narrative view fundamentally confusues art and (...)
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  50. Jennifer Gosetti-Ferencei (2012). The World and Image of Poetic Language: Heidegger and Blanchot. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):189-212.score: 40.0
    This essay engages ways in which the manifestation of ‘world’ occurs in poetry specifically through images, and how we can conceive of the imagination in this regard without reducing the imagination to a mimetic faculty of consciousness subordinate to cognition. Continental thought in the last century offers rich resources for this study. The notion of a ‘world’ is related to the poetic image in ways fundamental to the Heidegger’s theory of language, and may be seen in Continental poetics following Heidegger, (...)
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