Search results for 'Transplant' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Need A. Transplant (1984). "[Supplying Organs for Transplantation Jesse Dukeminier,] R." the Transplantation of Organs Will Be Assimilated Into Ordinary Clinical Practice... And There is No Need to Be Philosophical About It. This Will Come About for the Single and Suficient Reason That. [REVIEW] Bioethics Reporter 1 (1):22.
     
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  2.  4
    Benita Padilla, Gabriel M. Danovitch & Jacob Lavee (2013). Impact of Legal Measures Prevent Transplant Tourism: The Interrelated Experience of The Philippines and Israel. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):915-919.
    We describe the parallel changes that have taken place in recent years in two countries, Israel and The Philippines, the former once an “exporter” of transplant tourists and the latter once an “importer” of transplant tourists. These changes were in response to progressive legislation in both countries under the influence of the Declaration of Istanbul. The annual number of Israeli patients who underwent kidney transplantation abroad decreased from a peak of 155 in 2006 to an all-time low of (...)
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  3.  13
    Alireza Bagheri & Francis L. Delmonico (2013). Global Initiatives to Tackle Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):887-895.
    The increasing gap between organ supply and demand has opened the door for illegal organ sale, trafficking of human organs, tissues and cells, as well as transplant tourism. Currently, underprivileged and vulnerable populations in resource-poor countries are a major source of organs for rich patient-tourists who can afford to purchase organs at home or abroad. This paper presents a summary of international initiatives, such as World Health Organization’s Principle Guidelines, The Declaration of Istanbul, Asian Task Force Recommendations, as well (...)
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  4.  6
    L. Wright, J. S. Zaltzman, J. Gill & G. V. R. Prasad (2013). Kidney Transplant Tourism: Cases From Canada. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):921-924.
    Canada has a marked shortfall between the supply and demand for kidneys for transplantation. Median wait times for deceased donor kidney transplantation vary from 5.8 years in British Columbia, 5.2 years in Manitoba and 4.5 years in Ontario to a little over 2 years in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Living donation provides a viable option for some, but not all people. Consequently, a small number of people travel abroad to undergo kidney transplantation by commercial means. The extent to which they (...)
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    Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai (2006). Public, Experts, and Acceptance of Advanced Medical Technologies: The Case of Organ Transplant and Gene Therapy in Japan. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):203-214.
    In 1997, after long social debates, the Japanese government enacted a law on organ transplantation from brain-dead bodies. Since 1993, on gene therapy, administrative agencies have issued a series of guidelines. This study seeks to elucidate when people became aware of the issues and when they formed their opinions on organ transplant and gene therapy. At the same time, it aims to examine at which point in time experts, those in university ethical committees and in academic societies, consider these (...)
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  6.  2
    David Shafran, Martin L. Smith, Barbara J. Daly & David Goldfarb (2016). Transplant Ethics: Let’s Begin the Conversation Anew. HEC Forum 28 (2):141-152.
    Standardizing consultation processes is increasingly important as clinical ethics consultation becomes more utilized in and vital to medical practice. Solid organ transplant represents a relatively nascent field replete with complex ethical issues that, while explored, have not been systematically classified. In this paper, we offer a proposed taxonomy that divides issues of resource allocation from viable solutions to the issue of organ shortage in transplant and then further distinguishes between policy and bedside level issues. We then identify all (...)
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  7.  2
    Leonardo D. De Castro (2013). The Declaration of Istanbul in the Philippines: Success with Foreigners but a Continuing Challenge for Local Transplant Tourism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):929-932.
    The Philippine government officially responded to the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and the related WHO Guidelines on organ transplantation by prohibiting all transplants to foreigners using Filipino organs. However, local tourists have escaped the regulatory radar, leaving a very wide gap in efforts against human trafficking and transplant tourism. Authorities need to deal with the situation seriously, at a minimum, by issuing clear procedures for verifying declarations of kinship or emotional bonds between donors and recipients. Foreigners who (...)
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  8.  4
    Scott E. Wilks, Christina A. Spivey & Marie A. Chisholm‐Burns (2010). Psychometric Re‐Evaluation of the Immunosuppressant Therapy Adherence Scale Among Solid‐Organ Transplant Recipients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):64-68.
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  9. Simon Beck (2014). Transplant Thought-Experiments: Two Costly Mistakes in Discounting Them. South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):189-199.
    Transplant’ thought-experiments, in which the cerebrum is moved from one body to another, have featured in a number of recent discussions in the personal identity literature. Once taken as offering confirmation of some form of psychological continuity theory of identity, arguments from Marya Schechtman and Kathleen Wilkes have contended that this is not the case. Any such apparent support is due to a lack of detail in their description or a reliance on predictions that we are in no position (...)
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  10.  19
    Rosamond Rhodes & Thomas Schiano (2010). Transplant Tourism in China: A Tale of Two Transplants. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):3-11.
    The use of organs obtained from executed prisoners in China has recently been condemned by every major transplant organization. The government of the People's Republic of China has also recently made it illegal to provide transplant organs from executed prisoners to foreigners transplant tourists. Nevertheless, the extreme shortage of transplant organs in the U.S. continues to make organ transplantation in China an appealing option for some patients with end-stage disease. Their choice of traveling to China for (...)
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  11.  50
    I. Glenn Cohen (2013). Transplant Tourism: The Ethics and Regulation of International Markets for Organs. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (1):269-285.
    “Medical Tourism” is the travel of residents of one country to another country for treatment. In this article I focus on travel abroad to purchase organs for transplant, what I will call “Transplant Tourism.” With the exception of Iran, organ sale is illegal across the globe, but many destination countries have thriving black markets, either due to their willful failure to police the practice or more good faith lack of resources to detect it. I focus on the sale (...)
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  12.  5
    Fumie Arie (2008). Ethical Issues of Transplant Coordinators in Japan and the Uk. Nursing Ethics 15 (5):656-669.
    Ethical problems surrounding organ donation have been discussed since before technologies supported the procedure. In addition to issues on a societal level (e.g. brain-stem death, resource allocation), ethical concerns permeate the clinical practice of health care staff. These latter have been little studied. Using qualitative methods, this study, focused on transplant co-ordinators and their descriptions of dilemmas, ethical concerns and actions in response to them. Interviews with three co-ordinators in Japan and two in the UK revealed five areas in (...)
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  13.  29
    V. Thornton (2009). Who Gets the Liver Transplant? The Use of Responsibility as the Tie Breaker. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):739-742.
    Is it possible to invoke the use of moral responsibility as part of the selection criteria in the allocation of livers for transplant? Criticism has been applied to the difficulties inherent in including such a criterion and also the effect that employing such a judgement might have upon the relationship between the physician and patient. However, these criticisms rely on speculation and conjecture and do not relate to all the arguments put forward in favour of applying moral responsibility. None (...)
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  14.  55
    Mark T. Nelson (1991). The Morality of a Free Market for Transplant Organs. Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (1):63-79.
    There is a world-wide shortage of kidneys for transplantation. Many people will have to endure lengthy and unpleasant dialysis treatments, or die before an organ becomes available. Given this chronic shortage, some doctors and health economists have proposed offering financial incentives to potential donors to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, I explore objections to the practice of buying and selling organs from the point of view 1) justice, 2) beneficence and 3) Commodification. Regarding objection to the (...)
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  15.  1
    C. L. Cummings, K. A. Diefenbach & M. R. Mercurio (2014). Counselling Variation Among Physicians Regarding Intestinal Transplant for Short Bowel Syndrome. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):665-670.
    Background Intestinal transplant in infants with severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is an emerging therapy, yet without sufficient long-term data or established guidelines, resulting in possible variation in practice. Objectives To assess current attitudes and counselling practices among physicians regarding intestinal transplant in infants with SBS, and to determine whether counselling and management vary between subspecialists or centres. Methods A national sample of practicing paediatric surgeons and neonatologists was surveyed via the American Academy of Paediatrics listserves. Results were (...)
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  16.  10
    Tia Powell (2006). Face Transplant: Real and Imagined Ethical Challenges. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (1):111-115.
    Ethical lapses associated with the first facial transplant included breaches of confidentiality, bending of research rules, and film deals. However, discussions of the risk-benefit ratio for face transplantation are often deficient in that they ignore the needs, experience, and decision-making capability of potential recipients.
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  17.  11
    Rachel Ankeny Majeske (1996). Transforming Objectivity to Promote Equity in Transplant Candidate Selection. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    It is necessary to recognize the variety of levels at which values and norms may inappropriately affect the equity of the transplantation process, including candidate selection. Using a revised, richer concept of objectivity, adopted from Longino's work in the philosophy of science and empirical studies of candidate selection, this paper examines what sort of objectivity can be obtained in the transplant candidate selection process, and the closely related question of how selection can occur in an equitable manner. This concept (...)
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  18.  12
    Lesley A. Sharp (2002). Denying Culture in the Transplant Arena: Technocratic Medicine's Myth of Democratization. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (2):142-150.
    In the United States, organ transfer has generated a highly selective and overly specialized approach to bioethics. A dominant assumption is the myth of medical democracy: whereas professionals involved in this highly technocratic arena publicly embrace notions of medical equality, particularized practices expose another reality. The more specific ideological tenets of medical democracy read as follows: First, all potential transplant patients are equally deserving of replacement organs. Further, all citizens are entitled to equal access to these unusual commodities, which (...)
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  19.  17
    L. Cherkassky (2011). A Fair Trial? Assessment of Liver Transplant Candidates with Psychiatric Illnesses. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):739-742.
    Allocating scarce organs to transplant candidates is only one stage in the long process of organ transplantation. Before being listed, all candidates must undergo a rigorous assessment by a multidisciplinary transplant team. The Department of Health and NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) are responsible for the development of detailed strategies to ensure a fair and objective assessment experience for all transplant candidates. Difficulties arise when particularly vulnerable candidates, such as candidates with psychiatric illnesses, are assessed. NHSBT (...)
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  20.  4
    Manuel Nieto-Sampedro (1995). CNS Transplant Utility May Surive Even Their Hasty Clinical Application. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):65-65.
    Neural cell transplants have been introduced in clinical practice during the last decade with mixed results, encouraged by success with simple animal models. This commentary is a reminder that although the ideas and techniques of transplantation appear simple, the variables involved in host-transplant integration still require further study. The field may benefit from a concerted, multidisciplinary approach.
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  21.  15
    Volker H. Schmidt (1998). Selection of Recipients for Donor Organs in Transplant Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (1):50 – 74.
    This paper deals with a problem which has received a great deal of attention in the ethical literature, but about which very little is known empirically: the selection of recipients for organs in transplant medicine. Based on a larger study, it is shown how this problem is practically resolved in one European country, Germany. It is demonstrated that most of the criteria used to determine recipients are non-medical in nature, even though they generally tend to be rationalized in medical (...)
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  22.  12
    J. F. Douglas, M. L. Rose, J. H. Dark & A. J. Cronin (2011). Transplant Research and Deceased Donors: Laws, Licences and Fear of Liability. Clinical Ethics 6 (3):140-145.
    Transplantation research on samples and organs from deceased donors in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is under threat. The key problems relate to difficulties encountered in gaining consent for research projects, as distinct from consent to donation for clinical transplantation. They are due partly to the terms of the Human Tissue Act 2004 (the 2004 Act), and partly to its interpretation by the Human Tissue Authority (HTA). They include excessive interaction with donor representatives regarding ‘informed consent’ to research projects, uncertainty (...)
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  23.  1
    Clark Wolf, Commodification, Exploitation, and the Market for Transplant Organs: A Discussion of Dirty Pretty Things.
    In the film Dirty Pretty Things, one of the main characters, Okwe, discovers that his employer, "Sneaky", is running a peculiar business. During the day Sneaky seems an ordinary hotelier. But on the side he runs a service to provide counterfeit passports for illegal immigrants who wish to remain in Britain. He arranges for poor immigrants to "donate" one of their kidneys, which he sells to people in need of a transplant. In return, he provides the "donors" with forged (...)
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  24.  12
    Marjorie Kruvand & Bastiaan Vanacker (2011). Facing the Future: Media Ethics, Bioethics, and the World's First Face Transplant. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (2):135 - 157.
    When the world's first face transplant was performed in France in 2005, the complex medical procedure and accompanying worldwide media attention sparked many ethical issues, including how the media covered the story. This study uses framing theory to examine what happens when media ethics intersect with bioethics by analyzing French, American, and British media coverage on the transplant and its aftermath. This study looks at how this story was framed and which bioethical issues were focused upon. The media (...)
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  25.  11
    K. A. Bramstedt (2006). When Alcohol Abstinence Criteria Create Ethical Dilemmas for the Liver Transplant Team. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (5):263-265.
    In the setting of transplant medicine, decision making needs to take into account the multiple clinical and psychosocial case variables, rather than turn to arbitrary rules that cannot be scientifically supportedThe yearly demand for liver transplants far exceeds the supply of available organs .1 Additionally, alcoholic cirrhosis has been a controversial indication for transplant as these recipients can be viewed as having caused their own illness—an illness that is preventable by abstaining from alcohol . While not categorically denying (...)
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  26.  4
    Harriet Etheredge & Graham Paget (2015). Ethics and Rationing Access to Dialysis in Resource‐Limited Settings: The Consequences of Refusing a Renal Transplant in the South African State Sector. Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):233-240.
    Resource constraints in developing countries compel policy makers to ration the provision of healthcare services. This article examines one such set of Guidelines: A patient dialysing in the state sector in South Africa may not refuse renal transplantation when a kidney becomes available. Refusal of transplantation can lead to exclusion from the state-funded dialysis programme. This Guideline is legally acceptable as related to Constitutional stipulations which allow for rationing healthcare resources in South Africa. Evaluating the ethical merit of the Guideline, (...)
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  27.  3
    Véronique Fournier, Nicolas Foureur & Eirini Rari (2013). The Ethics of Living Donation for Liver Transplant: Beyond Donor Autonomy. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):45-54.
    This paper will present and discuss our conclusions about the ethics of living donation for liver transplant (LDLT) after 8 year of collaboration between our clinical ethics consultation service and liver transplant teams, in the course of which we met with all donor-candidates. We will focus on the results of a follow-up study that was conducted in order to evaluate the long-term consequences for potential donors and to interview them on the ethical aspects of the screening process. This (...)
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  28.  1
    M. Rowe (2002). Transplant: A Non-Fiction Narrative. Medical Humanities 28 (1):23-27.
    This narrative is taken from a memoir about my son, Jesse, who died at age 19 in 1995 after a liver transplant. It covers two periods—from May 5, his admission date at the hospital to wait for a transplant, until May 9, when a perforation, caused by cutting through intestinal adhesions during transplant surgery, was discovered, and from May 20 to May 22, when his condition became extremely critical. Since Jesse was largely unconscious or semi-conscious during a (...)
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  29. Ronald Y. Nakasone (2006). Ethics of Ambiguity : A Buddhist Reflection on the Japanese Organ Transplant Law. In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press
    This chapter examines the structure and role of ambiguity in the Japanese Organ Transplant Law by looking at the Chinese Huayen Buddhist doctrine of dharmadhatu-pratityasamutpada or universal dependent “coarising”, a major interpretation of the Buddha's pratityasamutpada, dependent-coarising or interdependence. Specifically, it will examine the nature of ambiguity through the zhuban yuanming jude men or “the attribute of the complete accommodation of principal and secondary dharmas” that Fazang formulated. The interdependent and evolving Buddhist vision of reality causes ambiguity in decision (...)
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  30.  11
    Eva Feder Kittay (2008). The Global Heart Transplant and Caring Across National Boundaries. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):138-165.
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  31.  43
    William R. LaFleur (2002). From Agape to Organs: Religious Difference Between Japan and America in Judging the Ethics of the Transplant. Zygon 37 (3):623-642.
    This essay argues that Japan's resistance to the practice of transplanting organs from persons deemed “brain dead” may not be the result, as some claim, of that society's religions being not yet sufficiently expressive of love and altruism. The violence to the body necessary for the excision of transplantable organs seems to have been made acceptable to American Christians at a unique historical “window of opportunity” for acceptance of that new form of medical technology. Traditional reserve about corpse mutilation had (...)
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  32. Robert M. Veatch (2000). A New Basis for Allocating Livers for Transplant. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (1):75-80.
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  33.  4
    Benjamin Hippen (2010). Professional Obligation and Supererogation With Reference to the Transplant Tourist. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):14-16.
  34. Heather Draper, Adam MacDiarmaid-Gordon, Laura Strumidlo, Bea Teuten & Eleanor Updale (2007). Virtual Clinical Ethics Committee, Case 8/Case 4 Vol 2: Should Non-Medical Circumstances Determine Whether a Child is Placed on the Transplant Register When There is a Risk of Wasting a Scarce Organ? [REVIEW] Clinical Ethics 2 (4):166-172.
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  35.  16
    H. Tristram Engelhardt (2007). The Injustice of Enforced Equal Access to Transplant Operations: Rethinking Reckless Claims of Fairness. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (2):256-264.
    The globalizing or totalizing imposition of a particular understanding of justice, fairness, or equality, as seen, for example, in Canada's single health care system, which forbids the sale of private insurance and the purchase of better basic health care, cannot be justified in general secular terms because of the following limitations: the plurality of understandings of justice, fairness, and equality, and the inability to establish one understanding as canonical. The secular state lacks plausible moral authority for the coercive imposition of (...)
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  36.  7
    Misao Fujita, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Akira Akabayashi (2010). Transplant Tourism From Japan. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):24-26.
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  37.  37
    Robert M. Veatch (1998). Egalitarian and Maximin Theories of Justice: Directed Donation of Organs for Transplant. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (5):456 – 476.
    It is common to interpret Rawls's maximin theory of justice as egalitarian. Compared to utilitarian theories, this may be true. However, in special cases practices that distribute resources so as to benefit the worst off actually increase the inequality between the worst off and some who are better off. In these cases the Rawlsian maximin parts company with what is here called true egalitarianism. A policy question requiring a distinction between maximin and "true egalitarian" allocations has arisen in the arena (...)
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  38.  5
    Dominique Martin (2010). Professional and Public Ethics United in Condemnation of Transplant Tourism. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):18-20.
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  39.  3
    Daniel Fu Chang Tsai (2010). Transplant Tourism From Taiwan to China: Some Reflection on Professional Ethics and Regulation. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):22-24.
  40. Sherine Hamdy (2008). Rethinking Islamic Legal Ethics in Egypt's Organ Transplant Debate. In Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.), Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press
  41.  1
    Giuliano Testa & Peter Angelos (2010). The Transplant Surgeon and Transplant Tourists: Ethical and Surgical Issues. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):12-13.
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  42.  13
    Donald Joralemon & Phil Cox (2003). Body Values: The Case Against Compensating for Transplant Organs. Hastings Center Report 33 (1):27-33.
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  43.  25
    Clark Wolf (2009). Commodification, Exploitation, and the Market for Transplant Organs. In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press 170.
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  44.  28
    D. P. Price (1997). Organ Transplant Initiatives: The Twilight Zone. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):170-175.
    Assessments of the acceptability of new transplantation practices require a pinpointing of not only the meaning of death, but also the timing of death. They typically perceive elective ventilation as occurring just prior to death and non-heart-beating donor protocols as operative just after death. However, such practices in fact highlight the general vagueness and ambiguity surrounding these issues in both law and ethics. Supply-side dilemmas in transplantation lend real urgency to this "life or death" debate.
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  45.  7
    Seeiso J. Koali (2015). Organ Transplant Trade: A Moral Examination. Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (5):261-267.
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  46. H. Tristram Engelhardt (2007). The Injustice of Enforced Equal Access to Transplant Operations: Rethinking Reckless Claims of Fairness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):256-264.
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  47.  18
    D. Lamb (1996). Procuring Organs by Transplant: The Debate Over Non-Heart-Beating Cadaver Protocols. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (1):60-61.
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  48.  19
    Helen Hardacre (1994). Response of Buddhism and Shintō to the Issue of Brain Death and Organ Transplant. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):585.
    Japan has no law recognizing the condition of brain death as the standard for determining that an individual has died. Instead, it is customary medical practice to declare a person dead when three conditions have been met: cessation of heart beat, cessation of respiration, and opening of the pupils. Of the developed nations, only Japan and Israel do not recognize brain death as the death of the human person.
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  49.  7
    Volker H. Schmidt (2003). Transplant Medicine as Borderline Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):319-321.
  50.  13
    Pat Milmoe McCarrick (1995). Organ Transplant Allocation. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (4):365-384.
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