Search results for 'Transplantation legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Mahoney (1975). Ethical Aspects of Donor Consent in Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):67-70.score: 84.0
    Two recent events have caused renewed anxiety concerning the ethics of donor transplantation. The first is the report of the British Transplantation Society and the second is the Bill introduced by Mr Tam Dalyell MP (see page 61 of this issue) in which he seeks to establish by law that unless an individual in his life time has expressly contracted out his organs may after death be used for transplantation. Dr Mahoney in this paper therefore examines from (...)
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  2. T. Dalyell (1975). Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):61-62.score: 78.0
    In this article Mr Tam Dalyell mp uses extracts from the speech1 he made in the House of Commons on 11 December 1974 to reiterate his reasons for persisting in his attempts to have formulated in law the right of hospitals to take such organs from a dead person as might be useful unless before death potential donors (all of us) had stated that they did not consent. Details of those objecting would be registered on a central computer.
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  3. Jürgen in der Schmitten (2002). Organtransplantation Ohne „Hirntod”-Konzept? Ethik in der Medizin 14 (2):60-70.score: 66.0
    Definition of the problem:Truog’s critique of the ”brain death” concept outlines inconsistencies well understood in the U.S. ethical debate, while he is one of the first to suggest returning to the traditional, coherent concept of death, thus breaking with the ”dead-donorrule.” The German transplantation law of 1996 endorses equating ”brain death” with death. A defeated draft, however, had acknowledged that irreversible total brain failure is a death-near state with a zero prognosis; organ harvesting, then, was to be allowed only (...)
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  4. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.score: 60.0
     
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  5. Crystal K. Liu (2007). 'Saviour Siblings'? The Distinction Between PGD with HLA Tissue Typing and Preimplantation HLA Tissue Typing. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):65-70.score: 50.0
    One of the more controversial uses of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) involves selecting embryos with a specific tissue type so that the child to be born can act as a donor to an existing sibling who requires a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. PGD with HLA tissue typing is used to select embryos that are free of a familial genetic disease and that are also a tissue match for an existing sibling who requires a transplant. Preimplantation HLA tissue typing occurs when (...)
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  6. Akira Akabayashi (1995). To Those Diet Members Responsible for Legislating on Japanese Organ Transplantation. Health Care Analysis 3 (4):358-360.score: 50.0
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  7. David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.score: 48.0
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  8. Juliana Rangel de Alvarenga Paes (2005). Le Corps Humain Et le Droit International. Anrt, Atelier National de Reproduction des Thèses.score: 48.0
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  9. Amel Alghrani (2013). Womb Transplantation and the Interplay of Islam and the West. Zygon 48 (3):618-634.score: 42.0
    In Saudi Arabia in 2000 the world's first human uterus transplant was attempted with some success. In 2011 the second successful human uterus transplant took place in Turkey. Doctors in the United Kingdom have recently announced that uterus transplants will be carried out in the UK if doctors can raise enough funds to complete their research. As scientists continue to make progress in this domain this is anticipated to be the next breakthrough in the arena of assisted reproductive technologies. The (...)
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  10. I. Kennedy (1979). The Donation and Transplantation of Kidneys: Should the Law Be Changed? Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (1):13-21.score: 42.0
    It is now eighteen years on since the Human Tissue Act 1961, but this legislation is still unchanged in England, Scotland and Wales. Ian Kennedy, in this paper, lays before us the law as it is, the problems of its interpretation and his opinion of what government should be doing to help clarify the situation and remove some of the problems which exist daily for the doctors who face the dilemma of seeking consent for transplants at the moment of (...)
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  11. Cristina Gavriluta & Mihaela Frunza (2012). Transplantation Debates in Romania Between Bioethics and Religion. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):49-71.score: 38.0
    In this paper, we thoroughly investigate the various solutions proposed to solve the problems of transplantation system in Romania. Three types of solutions are especially envisaged: legislative ones, institutional ones and cultural/religious ones. We carefully analyze the main ethical and logistical arguments on presumed consent and its alternatives in Romania: family consent provided by the relatives and mandated choice. Special attention is dedicated both to institutional solutions (organizational, educational and information issues) and to religious arguments and motivations, for there (...)
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  12. Benita Padilla, Gabriel M. Danovitch & Jacob Lavee (forthcoming). Impact of Legal Measures Prevent Transplant Tourism: The Interrelated Experience of The Philippines and Israel. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-5.score: 38.0
    We describe the parallel changes that have taken place in recent years in two countries, Israel and The Philippines, the former once an “exporter” of transplant tourists and the latter once an “importer” of transplant tourists. These changes were in response to progressive legislation in both countries under the influence of the Declaration of Istanbul. The annual number of Israeli patients who underwent kidney transplantation abroad decreased from a peak of 155 in 2006 to an all-time low of (...)
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  13. H. E. Emson (1987). The Ethics of Human Cadaver Organ Transplantation: A Biologist's Viewpoint. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):124-126.score: 36.0
    The rights of the various individuals involved in decision-making in cadaver organ donation are considered, and there is discussion of the relation of human cadavers to the planetary biomass. I conclude that the rights of the potential recipient should outweigh those of the other parties concerned and that education and legislation should recognise and promote this.
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  14. Wolfgang Greiner (1998). Organverteilungssysteme Im Transplantationswesen Aus Ökonomischer Sicht. Ethik in der Medizin 10 (2):64-73.score: 36.0
    Definition of the problem: Even after the new German legislation about organ donors and transplantation (“information solution”), the question of criteria for distributing the organs is still not solved. The various alternatives to solve this problem face different social acceptance and economic efficiency.Arguments: Medical criteria (e.g. HLA compatibility) and non-medical criteria (e.g. willingness to pay of the patients) are valued on the basis of generally accepted objectives (e.g. equal access to health services or low costs). As an innovative (...)
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  15. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Ethical and Legal Aspects of Unrelated Living Donors in Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (22):3-23.score: 30.0
    In this paper I investigate, from an ethical perspective, the legal prospects of unrelated living donors from Romania. In the present-day shortage of organs necessary for transplantation, the organs from living donors represent an alternative to the organs from deceased ones. Worldwide, unrelated living donors begin to be considered as a promising category among overall living donors. However, their situation raises many ethical questions that need to be addressed by adequate regulations and protections. The paper analyzes the case of (...)
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  16. David Lewis (2008). Ten Years of Public Interest Disclosure Legislation in the UK: Are Whistleblowers Adequately Protected? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):497 - 507.score: 24.0
    Purpose The purpose of this article is to assess the operation of the UK’s Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA 1998) during its first 10 years and to consider its implications for the whistleblowing process. Method The article sets the legislation into context by discussing the common law background. It then gives detailed consideration to the statutory provisions and how they have been interpreted by the courts and tribunals. Results In assessing the impact of the legislation’s approach to (...)
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  17. Fredrik Svenaeus (2010). The Body as Gift, Resource or Commodity? Heidegger and the Ethics of Organ Transplantation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):163-172.score: 24.0
    Three metaphors appear to guide contemporary thinking about organ transplantation. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating organs, the underlying perspective from the side of the state, authorities and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall rather be understood as a resource . The acute scarcity of organs, which generates a desperate demand in relation to a group of potential suppliers who are desperate to an equal extent, leads easily to the gift’s becoming, (...)
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  18. Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation. Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.score: 24.0
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of (...)
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  19. Jeremy Waldron (1999). The Dignity of Legislation. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    0n a lucid, concise volume, Jeremy Waldron defends the role of legislation, presenting it as an important mode of governance. Aristotle, Locke and Kant emerge as proponents of the dignity of legislation. Waldron's arguments are of obvious importance and topicality, especially in countries that are considering the introduction of a Bill of Rights. The Dignity of Legislation is original in conception, trenchantly argued and very clearly presented, and will be of interest to a wide range of scholars (...)
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  20. Alireza Bagheri (2003). Criticism of "Brain Death" Policy in Japan. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):359-372.score: 24.0
    : The 1997 Japanese organ transplantation law is the fruit of a long debate on "brain death" and organ transplantation, which involved the general public and experts in the relevant fields. The aim of this paper is to trace the history of the implementation of the law and to critique the law in terms of its consistency and fairness. The paper argues that the legislation adopts a double standard regarding the role of the family. On the one (...)
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  21. Ellen-Marie Forsberg (2011). Inspiring Respect for Animals Through the Law? Current Development in the Norwegian Animal Welfare Legislation. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):351-366.score: 24.0
    Over the last years, Norway has revised its animal welfare legislation. As of January 1, 2010, the Animal Protection Act of 1974 was replaced by a new Animal Welfare Act. This paper describes the developments in the normative structures from the old to the new act, as well as the main traits of the corresponding implementation and governance system. In the Animal Protection Act, the basic animal ethics principles were to avoid suffering, treat animals well, and consider their natural (...)
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  22. Andrew Sneddon (2009). Consent and the Acquisition of Organs for Transplantation. HEC Forum 21 (1):55-69.score: 24.0
    The two most commonly discussed and implemented rationales for acquiring organs for transplantation give consent a central role. I argue that such centrality is a mistake. The reason is that practices of consent serve only to respect patients as autonomous beings. The primary issue in acquiring organs for transplantation, however, is how it is appropriate to treat a newly non-autonomous being. Once autonomy and consent are dislodged from their central position, considerations of utility and fairness take a more (...)
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  23. Eric Meslin (1994). The Give and Take of Organ Procurement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (1):61-78.score: 24.0
    Scientific developments of the last 20 years have made the transplantation of cadaveric solid organs a viable and expected treatment alternative for patients suffering from various forms of End Stage Organ Disease. Of the number of organs that could be utilized for this, only a small percentage of them are actually made available. North American legislation explicitly categorizes the transfer of cadaveric organs as an anatomical or tissue "gift". The concept of the gift is mediated by transculturally consistent (...)
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  24. King Kui Sin (2013). Out of the Fly-Bottle: Conceptual Confusions in Multilingual Legislation. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (4):927-951.score: 24.0
    Conceptual confusions permeate all forms of intellectual pursuit. Many have contended that multilingual legislation, i.e., one law enacted in different languages, is unviable when carried out by means of translation. But not many have realized that the same would also be true of drafting if their contention could be justified. My involvement in the translation of Hong Kong laws into Chinese in the run-up to 1997 exposed me to a whole world of myths and misconceptions about legal translation arising (...)
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  25. Wibren Van der Burg & Frans Brom (2000). Legislation on Ethical Issues: Towards an Interactive Paradigm. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (1):57-75.score: 24.0
    In this article, we sketch a new approach to law and ethics. The traditional paradigm, exemplified in the debate on liberal moralism, becomes increasingly inadequate. Its basic assumptions are that there are clear moral norms of positive or critical morality, and that making statutory norms is an effective method to have citizens conform to those norms. However, for many ethical issues that are on the legislative agenda, e.g. with respect to bioethics and anti-discrimination law, the moral norms are controversial, vague (...)
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  26. Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (1998). Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.score: 24.0
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty (...)
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  27. Luc Wintgens (2012). Legisprudence: Practical Reason in Legislation. Ashgate.score: 24.0
    The metaphysics of legalism -- The individual in context -- Rationality in context -- Freedom in context -- Strong legalism or the absent theory of legislation -- Legitimacy and legitimation : from strong legalism to legisprudence -- From proxy to trading off : the principles of legisprudence -- Legisprudence and the duties of power : a legisprudential assessment of rational legislation.
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  28. Richard M. Zaner (1989). Anencephalics as Organ Donors. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):61-78.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews objections to the proposal to allow parents of anencephalics to donate their infant's organs for transplantation and finds them unpersuasive. Instead, interpretations of ‘Baby Doe’ legislation, a ‘higher-brain’ functional conception of death, the idea of ‘viability’ in many abortion statutes, and the wishes of many patients, give strong support for the proposal for organ transplantation using anencephalics. Keywords: anencephalic, definition of death, transplantation CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  29. Prof Dr Phil Christian Erk (2013). Das Eigentliche des Todes. Ein Beitrag zur Be-Lebung der Debatte über Hirntod und Transplantation. Ethik in der Medizin:1-15.score: 24.0
    Der vorliegende Artikel plädiert dafür, die meist auf die Aspekte Todesdefinition, -kriterium und -feststellung fokussierte Diskussion über die moralische (Un-)Zulässigkeit der Spende und Transplantation vitaler Organe aufzubrechen und beim Nachdenken darüber das zum Ausgangspunkt der Überlegungen zu machen, was mit dem Tod eigentlich verloren geht, nämlich das Leben. Nach einer Antwort auf die Frage „Was ist Leben?“ suchend wird hierbei aufgezeigt, dass Leben nicht auf das Vorhandensein gewisser beobachtbarer physiologischer Größen reduzierbar ist, sondern in seinem wesentlichen Kern nur mit (...)
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  30. Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor (2007). The United States Revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (2006): New Challenges to Balancing Patient Rights and Physician Responsibilities. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):19.score: 24.0
    Advance health care directives and informed consent remain the cornerstones of patients' right to self-determination regarding medical care and preferences at the end-of-life. However, the effectiveness and clinical applicability of advance health care directives to decision-making on the use of life support systems at the end-of-life is questionable. The Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (UAGA) has been revised in 2006 to permit the use of life support systems at or near death for the purpose of maximizing procurement opportunities of organs medically (...)
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  31. Céline Durand, Andrée Duplantie, Yves Chabot, Hubert Doucet & Marie-Chantal Fortin (2013). How is Organ Transplantation Depicted in Internal Medicine and Transplantation Journals. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):39.score: 24.0
    In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey’s critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant.
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  32. Hans Lindahl (2008). Collective Self-Legislation as an Actus Impurus : A Response to Heidegger's Critique of European Nihilism. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (3):323-343.score: 24.0
    Heidegger’s critique of European nihilism seeks to expose self-legislation as the governing principle of central manifestations of modernity such as science, technology, and the interpretation of art as aesthetics. Need we accept the conclusion that modern constitutional democracies are intrinsically nihilistic, insofar as they give political and legal form to the principle of collective self-legislation? An answer to this question turns on the concept of power implied in constituent and constituted power. A confrontation of the genealogies of modern (...)
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  33. Oleg Fedosiuk (2012). Criminal Legislation Against Illegal Income and Corruption: Between Good Intentions and Legitimacy. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1215-1233.score: 24.0
    Recently (2010–2011) new criminal legislation to combat illegal income and corruption was passed and publicly discussed in Lithuania. Within the list of the new legal measures, special attention should be paid to criminalisation of illicit enrichment, establishment of a model of extended property confiscation, reinforcement of responsibility for corruption-related offenses, a provision that not only property but also personal benefits may constitute a bribe. It can be seen from the explanatory letters attached to the draft laws and the political (...)
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  34. Nathan Crowe (2013). Cancer, Conflict, and the Development of Nuclear Transplantation Techniques. Journal of the History of Biology 47 (1):1-43.score: 24.0
    The technique of nuclear transplantation – popularly known as cloning – has been integrated into several different histories of twentieth century biology. Historians and science scholars have situated nuclear transplantation within narratives of scientific practice, biotechnology, bioethics, biomedicine, and changing views of life. However, nuclear transplantation has never been the focus of analysis. In this article, I examine the development of nuclear transplantation techniques, focusing on the people, motivations, and institutions associated with the first successful nuclear (...)
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  35. D. K. Martin & E. Meslin (1994). The Give and Take of Organ Procurement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (1):61-78.score: 24.0
    Scientific developments of the last 20 years have made the transplantation of cadaveric solid organs a viable and expected treatment alternative for patients suffering from various forms of End Stage Organ Disease. Of the number of organs that could be utilized for this, only a small percentage of them are actually made available. North American legislation explicitly categorizes the transfer of cadaveric organs as an anatomical or tissue “gift”. The concept of the gift is mediated by transculturally consistent (...)
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  36. G. de Wert, R. L. P. Berghmans, G. J. Boer, S. Andersen, B. Brambati, A. S. Carvalho, K. Dierickx, S. Elliston, P. Nunez, W. Osswald & M. Vicari (2002). Ethical Guidance on Human Embryonic and Fetal Tissue Transplantation: A European Overview. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (1):79-90.score: 24.0
    This article presents an overview ofregulations, guidelines and societal debates ineight member states of the EC about a)embryonic and fetal tissue transplantation(EFTT), and b) the use of human embryonic stemcells (hES cells) for research into celltherapy, including `therapeutic' cloning. Thereappears to be a broad acceptance of EFTT inthese countries. In most countries guidance hasbeen developed. There is a `strong' consensusabout some of the central conditions for `goodclinical practice' regarding EFTT.International differences concern, amongstothers, some of the informed consent issuesinvolved, and (...)
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  37. Dieter Birnbacher (2009). Neuroethics and Stem Cell Transplantation. Medicine Studies 1 (1):67-76.score: 24.0
    Is there anything special about the ethical problems of intracerebral stem-cell transplantation and other forms of cell or tissue transplantation in the brain that provides neuroethics with a distinctive normative profile, setting it apart from other branches of medical ethics? This is examined with reference to some of the ethical problems associated with interventions in the brain such as potential changes in personal identity and potential changes in personality. It is argued that these problems are not sufficiently specific (...)
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  38. Olena Grebeniuk (2013). Main Challenges and Prospects of Improving Ukrainian Legislation on Criminal Liability for Crimes Related to Drug Testing in the Context of European Integration. Jurisprudence 20 (3):1249-1270.score: 24.0
    The proposed article provides an overview of European and North American states’ legislation, which regulates the procedure for pre-clinical research, clinical trials and state registration of medicinal products, as well as responsibility for its violation, analysis of the problems and prospects of adaptation of the national legislation to European legal space, particularly in the field of criminal and legal regulation of relations in the sphere of pre-clinical trials, clinical trials and state registration of medicine. The emphasis is put (...)
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  39. Matthias Kliegel (1999). Das Verhältnis von Abtreibung Und Transplantation Fetalen Hirngewebes: Eine Mittel-Zweck-Beziehung? [REVIEW] Ethik in der Medizin 11 (3):162-168.score: 24.0
    Definition of the Problem: One of the main ethical arguments against the therapeutic transplantation of fetal tissue in severe cases of Parkinson’s disease is the allegation that the relationship between the abortion and the transplantation is a (bad)-means-to-a-(good)-end-relation.Arguments: This paper differentiates between the actual experimental single-case treatment and a potential mass treatment. In the former case, ethical guidelines seem to guarantee that abortion and transplantation are two distinct actions and therefore abortion is not a means to the (...)
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  40. Herman Nys & Paul Schotsmans (2000). Professional Autonomy in Belgium. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (5):425-439.score: 24.0
    The Belgian health care system has a few features that may havecontributed to the rising costs of health care: patients' freechoice of physicians, large clinical freedom of physicians, essentiallya fee-for-service remuneration for medical specialists in which the feesare agreed between insurance funds and physicians. The increased medicalconsumption and costs have prompted the state and insurance companies totake measures that limit the professional autonomy of the physicians.Access to medical education, free until 1997, is now restricted. Themedical profession is organized in the (...)
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  41. Jacques Quintin (2013). Organ Transplantation and Meaning of Life: The Quest for Self Fulfilment. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):565-574.score: 24.0
    Today, the frequency and the rate of success resulting from advances in medicine have made organ transplantations an everyday occurrence. Still, organ transplantations and donations modify the subjective experience of human beings as regards the image they have of themselves, of body, of life and of death. If the concern of the quality of life and the survival of the patients is a completely human phenomenon, the fact remains that the possibility of organ transplantation and its justification depend a (...)
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  42. David Shaw (forthcoming). Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Legal and Ethical Issues in the UK. In Jörg P. Halter Peter Bürkli (ed.), The Legal and Ethical Challenges of Present and Future Stem-Cell Transplantation. Schwabe Verlag.score: 23.0
    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely accepted practice in the United Kingdom (UK). The relatively liberal UK law permits donation both within families and from strangers, and even allows the creation of “saviour siblings” who are brought into being with the specific intent of having them donate stem cells to save other members of their family. This chapter describes the regulation of HSCT in the UK and highlights some ethical issues related to discrimination against some categories of potential (...)
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  43. Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor (2009). Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.score: 22.0
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea (i.e., brain death) with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism (locked-in syndrome), minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. (1) (...)
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  44. Jean-Pierre Wils (2002). Stammzellen-Transplantation Aus Nabelschnurblut – Ethische Probleme. Ethik in der Medizin 14 (2):71-83.score: 22.0
    Definition of the problem: Stem cell transplantations from umbilical cord blood, especially if from autologous origin, are often treated with distrust. Not only are the therapeutic effects controversial, but the question of ownership is also hard to answer from an ethical point of view. Furthermore, the extraction of umbilical cord blood is already related to information about the factual and potential health condition of the child and its parents. Arguments and conclusion: The three problems will be discussed separately. Despite certain (...)
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  45. Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo, Edith Valdez-Martínez & Miguel Bedolla (2014). Ethical Issues Relating to Renal Transplantation From Prediabetic Living Donor. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):45.score: 22.0
    In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end − stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to health, the ethical considerations (...)
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  46. Viktoras Justickis & Vidmantas Egidijus Kurapka (2009). Criminogenic Security of Law in the EU and Lithuanian Legislation. Jurisprudence 117 (3):217-238.score: 22.0
    The study focuses on the phenomenon of crime-causing (criminogenic) law. It includes a review of related studies on such laws and their criminal side-effects, the change in the legislator’s liability for effects of enacted laws, and the effects of the legislator’s afflatus on the potential criminogenic effects of law. Of special concern are cases where the legislator is aware of the potential criminogenic side-effects of a new law but carelessly neglects them. The study evaluates the tool for detection of probable (...)
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  47. Fredrik Svenaeus (2010). What is an Organ? Heidegger and the Phenomenology of Organ Transplantation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):179-196.score: 21.0
    This paper investigates the question of what an organ is from a phenomenological perspective. Proceeding from the phenomenology of being-in-the-world developed by Heidegger in Being and Time and subsequent works, it compares the being of the organ with the being of the tool. It attempts to display similarities and differences between the embodied nature of the organs and the way tools of the world are handled. It explicates the way tools belong to the totalities of things of the world that (...)
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  48. Jan Deckers (2010). The Right to Life and Abortion Legislation in England and Wales: A Proposal for Change. Diametros 26:1-22.score: 21.0
    In England and Wales, there is significant controversy on the law related to abortion. Recent discussions have focussed predominantly on the health professional's right to conscientious objection. This article argues for a comprehensive overhaul of the law from the perspective of an author who adopts the view that all unborn human beings should be granted the prima facie right to life. It is argued that, should the law be modified in accordance with this stance, it need not imply that health (...)
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  49. Jennifer Moore (2013). Proposed Changes to New Zealand's Medicines Legislation in the Medicines Amendment Bill 2011. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):59-66.score: 21.0
    This article evaluates New Zealand’s Medicines Amendment Bill 2011. This Bill is currently before Parliament and will amend the Medicines Act 1981. On June 20, 2011, the Australian and New Zealand governments announced their decision to proceed with a joint scheme for the regulation of therapeutic products such as medicines, medical devices, and new medical interventions. Eventually, the joint arrangements will be administered by a single regulatory agency: the Australia New Zealand Therapeutic Products Agency. The medicines regulations in Australia and (...)
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  50. Giovanni Boniolo (2007). Death and Transplantation: Let's Try to Get Things Methodologically Straight. Bioethics 21 (1):32–40.score: 21.0
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