Search results for 'Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  2. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.
     
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  3. Juliana Rangel de Alvarenga Paes (2005). Le Corps Humain Et le Droit International. Anrt, Atelier National de Reproduction des Thèses.
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  4. Jay Katz & Alexander Morgan Capron (1975). Catastrophic Diseases Who Decides What? : A Psychosocial and Legal Analysis of the Problems Posed by Hemodialysis and Organ Transplantation.
     
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  5. Renée C. Fox & Judith P. Swazey (1974). The Courage to Fail a Social View of Organ Transplants and Dialysis. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  6. Francis E. Camps & Edward Shotter (eds.) (1970). Matters of Life and Death. London,Darton, Longman & Todd.
     
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  7. Robert M. Veatch (1989). Medical Ethics.
     
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  8.  2
    Dominik Gross, Brigitte Tag & Christoph Schweikardt (eds.) (2011). Who Wants to Live Forever?: Postmoderne Formen des Weiterwirkens Nach Dem Tod. Campus-Verlag.
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  9. Bunki Kimura (2007). Shōji No Bukkyōgaku: "Ningen No Songen" to Sono Ōyō. Hōzōkan.
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  10. Maria Nowacka (2004). Selected Bioethical Questions: The Polish Perspective. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu W Białymstoku.
     
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  11.  4
    Timothy F. Murphy & Robert M. Veatch (2005). Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):50-59.
    In the United States, people may donate organs and tissues to a family member, friend, or anyone whose specific need becomes known to them. For example, in late 2003 dozens of people came forward to donate a kidney to a professional basketball player known to them only through his sports performances. People may also donate a kidney to no one in particular through a process known as nondirected donation. In nondirected donation, people donate a kidney to the organ (...)
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  12.  13
    Nancy Scheper-Hughes & Loïc J. D. Wacquant (eds.) (2002). Commodifying Bodies. Sage Publications.
    Increasingly the body is a possession that does not belong to us. It is bought and sold, bartered and stolen, marketed wholesale or in parts. The professions - especially reproductive medicine, transplant surgery, and bioethics but also journalism and other cultural specialists - have been pliant partners in this accelerating commodification of live and dead human organisms. Under the guise of healing or research, they have contributed to a new 'ethic of parts' for which the divisible body is severed from (...)
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  13.  5
    I. Kennedy (1979). The Donation and Transplantation of Kidneys: Should the Law Be Changed? Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (1):13-21.
    It is now eighteen years on since the Human Tissue Act 1961, but this legislation is still unchanged in England, Scotland and Wales. Ian Kennedy, in this paper, lays before us the law as it is, the problems of its interpretation and his opinion of what government should be doing to help clarify the situation and remove some of the problems which exist daily for the doctors who face the dilemma of seeking consent for transplants at the moment (...)
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  14.  50
    J. Mahoney (1975). Ethical Aspects of Donor Consent in Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):67-70.
    Two recent events have caused renewed anxiety concerning the ethics of donor transplantation. The first is the report of the British Transplantation Society and the second is the Bill introduced by Mr Tam Dalyell MP (see page 61 of this issue) in which he seeks to establish by law that unless an individual in his life time has expressly contracted out his organs may after death be used for transplantation. Dr Mahoney in this paper therefore examines from (...)
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  15.  9
    H. D. C. Roscam Abbing (1993). Transplantation of Organs: A European Perspective. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 21 (1):54-58.
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  16. H. D. C. Roscam Abbing (1993). Transplantation of Organs: A European Perspective. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (1):54-58.
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  17.  4
    Daniel Luke Geyser (2000). Organ Transplantation: New Regulations to Alter Distribution of Organs. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):95-98.
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  18. Daniel Luke Geyser (2000). Organ Transplantation: New Regulations to Alter Distribution of Organs. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):95-98.
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  19.  18
    Peter Westen (2007). Two Rules of Legality in Criminal Law. Law and Philosophy 26 (3):229-305.
    Criminal law scholars approach legality in various ways. Some scholars eschew over-arching principles and proceed directly to one or more distinct “rules”: (1) the rule against retroactive criminalization; (2) the rule that criminal statutes be construed narrowly; (3) the rule against the judicial creation of common-law offenses; and (4) the rule that vague criminal statutes are void. Other scholars seek a single principle, i.e., the “principle of legality,” that they claim underlies the four rules. In contrast, I believe that both (...)
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  20.  74
    Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu (2012). Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation. Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of (...)
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  21.  1
    Viktoras Justickis & Vidmantas Egidijus Kurapka (2009). Criminogenic Security of Law in the EU and Lithuanian Legislation. Jurisprudence 117 (3):217-238.
    The study focuses on the phenomenon of crime-causing (criminogenic) law. It includes a review of related studies on such laws and their criminal side-effects, the change in the legislator’s liability for effects of enacted laws, and the effects of the legislator’s afflatus on the potential criminogenic effects of law. Of special concern are cases where the legislator is aware of the potential criminogenic side-effects of a new law but carelessly neglects them. The study evaluates the tool for detection of probable (...)
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  22.  27
    Andrew Sneddon (2009). Consent and the Acquisition of Organs for Transplantation. HEC Forum 21 (1):55-69.
    The two most commonly discussed and implemented rationales for acquiring organs for transplantation give consent a central role. I argue that such centrality is a mistake. The reason is that practices of consent serve only to respect patients as autonomous beings. The primary issue in acquiring organs for transplantation, however, is how it is appropriate to treat a newly non-autonomous being. Once autonomy and consent are dislodged from their central position, considerations of utility and fairness take a more (...)
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  23.  9
    Edward McWhinney, Sienho Yee & Jacques-Yvan Morin (eds.) (2009). Multiculturalism and International Law: Essays in Honour of Edward Mcwhinney. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.
    This volume examines the role and influence of multiculturalism in general theories of international law; in the composition and functioning of international ...
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  24.  49
    Aaron Spital (2003). Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation: Neglected Again. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):169-174.
    : The March 2003 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal was devoted to cadaveric organ procurement. All the discussed proposals for solving the severe organ shortage place a higher value on respecting individual and/or family autonomy than on maximizing recovery of organs. Because of this emphasis on autonomy and historically high refusal rates, I believe that none of the proposals is likely to achieve the goal of ensuring an adequate supply of transplantable organs. An alternative approach, conscription of (...)
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  25.  41
    Walter Glannon (2008). The Case Against Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (3):330-336.
    In a recent set of papers, Aaron Spital has proposed conscription or routine recovery of cadaveric organs without consent as a way of ameliorating the severe shortage of organs for transplantation. Under the existing consent requirement, organs can be taken from the bodies of the deceased if they expressed a wish and intention to donate while alive. Organs may also be taken when families or other substitute decisionmakers decide on behalf of the deceased to allow organ procurement for the (...)
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  26. Sven Arntzen (1988). Kant's Theory of Juridical Duties and Their Legislation: An Examination of the Relationship of Law and Morality According to "Metaphysik der Sitten". Dissertation, The Johns Hopkins University
    Kant has made an attempt in his Doctrine of Law to show that the principles of natural Law are a priori principles of pure practical reason. He considers this a necessary step towards establishing the obligating force of positive legislation within a legal system. It is not obvious, however, that Law, which recognizes external coercion as a possible incentive for the compliance with its duties, can be reconciled with pure practical reason, which through the categorical imperative commands that one (...)
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  27.  9
    Alexander Tabarrok & David J. Undis (2006). Response to “Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups” by Timothy F. Murphy and Robert M. Veatch. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (4):450-456.
    In their paper “Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups,” Timothy Murphy and Robert Veatch question the ethical underpinnings of LifeSharers, a grass-roots effort to increase the supply of organs by giving organ donors preferred access to organs.
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  28.  1
    Simon Whittaker (2001). Public and Private Law-Making: Subordinate Legislation, Contracts and the Status of «Student Rules». Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (1):103-128.
    This article draws analogies between the making of norms by contract, often seen as typical of private law, and by subordinate law-making, often seen as a typically public function and for public bodies. These analogies are set in the context of those rules which govern the relations between universities and their students, as the same types of rule may find their source in a range of legal sources: prescription, royal charter, parliamentary legislation or contract. Of these different sources, the (...)
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  29. Sheila McLean (2010). Autonomy, Consent and the Law. Routledge-Cavendish.
    From Hippocrates to paternalism to autonomy : the new hegemony -- From autonomy to consent -- Consent, autonomy, and the law -- Autonomy at the end of life -- Autonomy and pregnancy -- Autonomy and genetic information -- Autonomy and organ transplantation -- Autonomy, consent, and the law.
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  30.  30
    G. Moorlock, H. Draper & S. R. Bramhall (2011). Liver Transplantation Using 'Donation After Circulatory Death' Donors: The Ethics of Managing the End-of-Life Care of Potential Donors to Achieve Organs Suitable for Transplantation. Clinical Ethics 6 (3):134-139.
    The decline in organs donated after brain death has been countered by an increase in organs donated after circulatory death. Organs donated after circulatory death present an increased risk of complications for their eventual recipients when compared with organs donated after brain death, so the likelihood of successful transplantation is decreased. If organ donation is considered to be in the best interests of the patient, interventions that facilitate successful donation and transplantation might be permissible. This paper seeks to (...)
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  31. Martin Golding (1993). Retroactive Legislation And Restoration Of The Rule Of Law. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 1.
    The underlying theme of this article is how a successor state should deal with its past. It considers whether a state that is committed to the rule of law may depart from it in order to deal with problems left to it by its predecessor regime. Specifically, may it use retroactive legislation to punish informers who collaborated with a predecessor police state? Lon Fuller's formulation of the canons of the rule of law as an internal morality of law is (...)
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  32.  58
    Leslie P. Francis & John G. Francis (2010). Stateless Crimes, Legitimacy, and International Criminal Law: The Case of Organ Trafficking. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):283-295.
    Organ trafficking and trafficking in persons for the purpose of organ transplantation are recognized as significant international problems. Yet these forms of trafficking are largely left out of international criminal law regimes and to some extent of domestic criminal law regimes as well. Trafficking of organs or persons for their organs does not come within the jurisdiction of the ICC, except in very special cases such as when conducted in a manner that conforms to the definitions of (...)
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  33.  24
    F. Svenaeus (2012). Organ Transplantation and Personal Identity: How Does Loss and Change of Organs Affect the Self? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):139-158.
    In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation experienced through (...)
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  34.  3
    Muireann Quigley, Margaret Brazier, Ruth Chadwick, Monica Navarro Michel & David Paredes (2008). The Organs Crisis and the Spanish Model: Theoretical Versus Pragmatic Considerations. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):223-224.
    In the United Kingdom, the debate about how best to meet the shortfall of organs for transplantation has persisted on and off for many years. It is often presumed that the answer is simply to alter the law to a system of presumed consent. Acting perhaps on that presumption in his annual report launched in July, the Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson, advocated a system of organ donation based on presumed consent, the so-called “opt-out” system.1 He is calling (...)
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  35.  7
    Barbara Ann Hocking (ed.) (2008). The Nexus of Law and Biology: New Ethical Challenges. Ashgate Pub. Company.
    Featuring an impressive roster of contributors, this book will serve as a bold and irreplaceable source of information for legal scholars, lawyers, and ...
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  36.  5
    M. E. Hodson (2000). Transplantation Using Lung Lobes From Living Donors. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):419-421.
    IntroductionAt present, in the UK, live lobe donation of the lung is generally considered in the context of patients with cystic fibrosis which is a life-threatening, inherited disease.1 However, if this technique is successfully developed it may be applicable to other patients with end stage lung disease. Cystic fibrosis is a disease where the major morbidity and mortality is due to pulmonary infection and respiratory failure.2 In l938 70% of patients born with CF died within one year of birth, but (...)
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  37. M. Quigley, M. Brazier, R. Chadwick, M. N. Michel & D. Paredes (2008). The Organs Crisis and the Spanish Model: Theoretical Versus Pragmatic Considerations. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):223-224.
    In the United Kingdom, the debate about how best to meet the shortfall of organs for transplantation has persisted on and off for many years. It is often presumed that the answer is simply to alter the law to a system of presumed consent. Acting perhaps on that presumption in his annual report launched in July, the Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson, advocated a system of organ donation based on presumed consent, the so-called “opt-out” system.1 He is calling (...)
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  38.  58
    Tom O'Shea (2015). A Law of One's Own: Self‐Legislation and Radical Kantian Constructivism. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):1153-1173.
    Radical constructivists appeal to self-legislation in arguing that rational agents are the ultimate sources of normative authority over themselves. I chart the roots of radical constructivism and argue that its two leading Kantian proponents are unable to defend an account of self-legislation as the fundamental source of practical normativity without this legislation collapsing into a fatal arbitrariness. Christine Korsgaard cannot adequately justify the critical resources which agents use to navigate their practical identities. This leaves her account riven (...)
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  39.  9
    Masahiro Morioka & Tateo Sugimoto (2001). A Proposal For Revision Of The Organ Transplantation Law Based On A Child Donor’s Prior Declaration. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 11 (4):108-109.
    This is the translation of the so-called Morioka&Sugimoto proposal on brain death and transplantation. We proposed that the prior declaration of a brain dead child should be respected, and that when the child does not have a donor card the organ removal should be prohibited. A material for understanding an unprecedented bioethics debate now occurring in Japan.
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  40.  8
    Isabel Karpin (2012). Perfecting Pregnancy: Law, Disability, and the Future of Reproduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Disability; 2. Risk; 3. Terminations; 4. De-selections; 5. Interpretations; 6. Futures.
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  41. Rosamund Scott (2007). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Hart.
  42. Tom Koch (1998). The Limits of Principle: Deciding Who Lives and What Dies. Praeger.
     
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  43.  19
    Alberto Bondolfi (2000). Ethics, Law and Legislation: The Institutionalisation of Moral Reflection. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (1):27-37.
    This paper describes the different dimensions of the relation between moral reflection and legislative processes. It discusses some examples of the institutionalisation of moral reflection. It is argued that the relation between ethics and law is still an actual and relevant question. Ethics also has to reflect on its own role in political life. The paper defends the relevance of a theological perspective on the relation between law and ethics. In the last part it is argued that the modality of (...)
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  44. García San José & I. Daniel (2010). International Bio Law: An International Overview of Developments in Human Embryo Research and Experimentation. Ediciones Laborum.
     
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  45.  41
    Aaron Spital (2005). Conscription of Cadaveric Organs for Transplantation: A Stimulating Idea Whose Time Has Not Yet Come. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):107-112.
    Transplantation is now the best therapy for eligible patients with end-stage organ disease. For patients with failed kidneys, successful renal transplantation improves the quality and increases the quantity of their lives. For people with other types of organ failure, transplantation offers the only hope for long-term survival. a.
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  46.  12
    Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor (2009). Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism, minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. Brain death does not disrupt somatic (...)
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  47.  62
    J. Savulescu (1999). Should We Clone Human Beings? Cloning as a Source of Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):87-95.
    The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self-compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo experimentation. I argue that this research is less morally problematic than other embryo research. Indeed, it is not merely morally permissible but morally required that we employ cloning to produce embryos or fetuses for the sake (...)
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  48.  2
    R. C. Cefalo & H. T. Engelhardt (1989). The Use of Fetal and Anencephalic Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):25-43.
    Advances in transplantation have extended the life and relieved the suffering of thousands of individuals. The prospect of being able to use tissues from embryos, as well as from anencephalic newborns, offers the promise of further relief of suffering. However, these possibilities raise significant moral and public policy issues. The question arises of the extent to which those who disapprove of abortion may make use of tissues derived from abortion in order to treat serious diseases. This essay argues that, (...)
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  49.  6
    H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1989). The Use of Fetal and Anencephalic Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):25-43.
    Advances in transplantation have extended the life and relieved the suffering of thousands of individuals. The prospect of being able to use tissues from embryos, as well as from anencephalic newborns, offers the promise of further relief of suffering. However, these possibilities raise significant moral and public policy issues. The question arises of the extent to which those who disapprove of abortion may make use of tissues derived from abortion in order to treat serious diseases. This essay argues that, (...)
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  50. Thomas L. Muinzer (2014). The Law of the Dead: A Critical Review of Burial Law, with a View to its Development. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 34 (4):791-818.
    This article critically reviews the present condition of burial law. Situating burial within the wider context of the ‘law of the dead’, it is observed that contemporary changes to the law have served to clarify and reinforce the individual’s power to determine what will happen to his or her organs and tissues upon death. An equivalent right to posthumous bodily self-determination has not been extended to the neglected area of burial, and it is recommended that burial (...)
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