Search results for 'Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David W. Meyers (1990). The Human Body and the Law. Stanford University Press.score: 2220.0
    Mother and Fetus: Rights in Conflict A. INTRODUCTION After fertilization of the female egg (ovum) with male sperm the resulting zygote may implant ...
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  2. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.score: 2199.0
     
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  3. Juliana Rangel de Alvarenga Paes (2005). Le Corps Humain Et le Droit International. Anrt, Atelier National de Reproduction des Thèses.score: 2094.0
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  4. Francis E. Camps & Edward Shotter (eds.) (1970). Matters of Life and Death. London,Darton, Longman & Todd.score: 846.4
     
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  5. Nancy Scheper-Hughes & Loïc J. D. Wacquant (eds.) (2002). Commodifying Bodies. Sage Publications.score: 840.3
    Increasingly the body is a possession that does not belong to us. It is bought and sold, bartered and stolen, marketed wholesale or in parts. The professions - especially reproductive medicine, transplant surgery, and bioethics but also journalism and other cultural specialists - have been pliant partners in this accelerating commodification of live and dead human organisms. Under the guise of healing or research, they have contributed to a new 'ethic of parts' for which the divisible body is severed from (...)
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  6. Dominik Gross, Brigitte Tag & Christoph Schweikardt (eds.) (2011). Who Wants to Live Forever?: Postmoderne Formen des Weiterwirkens Nach Dem Tod. Campus-Verlag.score: 771.4
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  7. Bunki Kimura (2007). Shōji No Bukkyōgaku: "Ningen No Songen" to Sono Ōyō. Hōzōkan.score: 771.4
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  8. Maria Nowacka (2004). Selected Bioethical Questions: The Polish Perspective. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu W Białymstoku.score: 771.4
     
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  9. Tom Koch (1998). The Limits of Principle: Deciding Who Lives and What Dies. Praeger.score: 457.7
     
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  10. I. Kennedy (1979). The Donation and Transplantation of Kidneys: Should the Law Be Changed? Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (1):13-21.score: 365.7
    It is now eighteen years on since the Human Tissue Act 1961, but this legislation is still unchanged in England, Scotland and Wales. Ian Kennedy, in this paper, lays before us the law as it is, the problems of its interpretation and his opinion of what government should be doing to help clarify the situation and remove some of the problems which exist daily for the doctors who face the dilemma of seeking consent for transplants at the moment of (...)
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  11. J. F. Douglas, M. L. Rose, J. H. Dark & A. J. Cronin (2011). Transplant Research and Deceased Donors: Laws, Licences and Fear of Liability. Clinical Ethics 6 (3):140-145.score: 358.6
    Transplantation research on samples and organs from deceased donors in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is under threat. The key problems relate to difficulties encountered in gaining consent for research projects, as distinct from consent to donation for clinical transplantation. They are due partly to the terms of the Human Tissue Act 2004 (the 2004 Act), and partly to its interpretation by the Human Tissue Authority (HTA). They include excessive interaction with donor representatives regarding ‘informed consent’ to research (...)
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  12. J. Mahoney (1975). Ethical Aspects of Donor Consent in Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):67-70.score: 330.0
    Two recent events have caused renewed anxiety concerning the ethics of donor transplantation. The first is the report of the British Transplantation Society and the second is the Bill introduced by Mr Tam Dalyell MP (see page 61 of this issue) in which he seeks to establish by law that unless an individual in his life time has expressly contracted out his organs may after death be used for transplantation. Dr Mahoney in this paper therefore examines from (...)
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  13. T. Dalyell (1975). Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):61-62.score: 288.0
    In this article Mr Tam Dalyell mp uses extracts from the speech1 he made in the House of Commons on 11 December 1974 to reiterate his reasons for persisting in his attempts to have formulated in law the right of hospitals to take such organs from a dead person as might be useful unless before death potential donors (all of us) had stated that they did not consent. Details of those objecting would be registered on a central computer.
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  14. Angela Potochnik & Brian McGill (2012). The Limitations of Hierarchical Organization. Philosophy of Science 79 (1):120-140.score: 264.0
    The concept of hierarchical organization is commonplace in science. Subatomic particles compose atoms, which compose molecules; cells compose tissues, which compose organs, which compose organisms; etc. Hierarchical organization is particularly prominent in ecology, a field of research explicitly arranged around levels of ecological organization. The concept of levels of organization is also central to a variety of debates in philosophy of science. Yet many difficulties plague the concept of discrete hierarchical levels. In this paper, we show how these difficulties undermine (...)
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  15. V. Moises Serrano-Delgado, Barbara Novello-Garza & Edith Valdez-Martinez (2009). Ethical Issues Relating the the Banking of Umbilical Cord Blood in Mexico. BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):12-.score: 255.4
    BackgroundUmbilical cord banks are a central component, as umbilical cord tissue providers, in both medical treatment and scientific research with stem cells. But, whereas the creation of umbilical cord banks is seen as successful practice, it is perceived as a risky style of play by others. This article examines and discusses the ethical, medical and legal considerations that arise from the operation of umbilical cord banks in Mexico.DiscussionA number of experts have stated that the use of umbilical cord goes beyond (...)
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  16. Christopher M. Tedeschi (1995). Foetal Tissue Transplantation Research: Scientific Progress and the Role of Special Interest Groups. [REVIEW] Minerva 33 (1):45-66.score: 245.1
    As the debate about research on foetal tissue transplantation progressed, medical scientists learned more about the procedure and its potential for helping persons with degenerative brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Increased scientific knowledge significantly influenced the political process, yet it did not by any means resolve the debate. Rather, increased medical evidence served as a lens which focused discourse on particular issues related to foetal research, such as the details of obtaining informed consent, as well as technical matters (...)
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  17. J. Coggon (2013). Elective Ventilation for Organ Donation: Law, Policy and Public Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):130-134.score: 240.0
    This paper examines questions concerning elective ventilation, contextualised within English law and policy. It presents the general debate with reference both to the Exeter Protocol on elective ventilation, and the considerable developments in legal principle since the time that that protocol was declared to be unlawful. I distinguish different aspects of what might be labelled elective ventilation policies under the following four headings: ‘basic elective ventilation’; ‘epistemically complex elective ventilation’; ‘practically complex elective ventilation’; and ‘epistemically and practically complex elective ventilation’. (...)
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  18. Eric Meslin (1994). The Give and Take of Organ Procurement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (1):61-78.score: 238.6
    Scientific developments of the last 20 years have made the transplantation of cadaveric solid organs a viable and expected treatment alternative for patients suffering from various forms of End Stage Organ Disease. Of the number of organs that could be utilized for this, only a small percentage of them are actually made available. North American legislation explicitly categorizes the transfer of cadaveric organs as an anatomical or tissue "gift". The concept of the gift is mediated by transculturally consistent (...)
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  19. D. K. Martin & E. Meslin (1994). The Give and Take of Organ Procurement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (1):61-78.score: 238.6
    Scientific developments of the last 20 years have made the transplantation of cadaveric solid organs a viable and expected treatment alternative for patients suffering from various forms of End Stage Organ Disease. Of the number of organs that could be utilized for this, only a small percentage of them are actually made available. North American legislation explicitly categorizes the transfer of cadaveric organs as an anatomical or tissue “gift”. The concept of the gift is mediated by transculturally consistent (...)
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  20. J. Sandor, P. Bard, C. Tamburrini & T. Tannsjo (2012). The Case of Biobank with the Law: Between a Legal and Scientific Fiction. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):347-350.score: 237.9
    According to estimates more than 400 biobanks currently operate across Europe. The term ‘biobank’ indicates a specific field of genetic study that has quietly developed without any significant critical reflection across European societies. Although scientists now routinely use this phrase, the wider public is still confused when the word ‘bank’ is being connected with the collection of their biological samples. There is a striking lack of knowledge of this field. In the recent Eurobarometer survey it was demonstrated that even in (...)
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  21. Christoph Gradmann (2001). Isolation, Contamination, and Pure Culture: Monomorphism and Polymorphism of Pathogenic Micro-Organisms as Research Problem 1860-1880. Perspectives on Science 9 (2):147-172.score: 228.0
    : This article analyzes German debates on the microbiology of infectious diseases from 1865 to 1875 and asks how and when organic pollution in tissues became noteworthy for aetiology and pathogenesis. It was with Ernst Hallier's pleomorphistic microbiology that the organic character of alien material in tissues came to be regarded as important for pathology. The process that followed saw both vigorous biological critique and a number of medical applications of Hallier's work. Around 1874 contemporaries reached the conclusion that pleomorphous (...)
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  22. Safia Mahomed, Melodie Nöthling-Slabbert & Michael S. Pepper (2013). The Legal Position on the Classification of Human Tissue in South Africa: Can Tissues Be Owned? South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 6 (1):14.score: 220.3
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  23. M. Brazier & S. Fovargue (2006). A Brief Guide to the Human Tissue Act 2004. Clinical Ethics 1 (1):26-32.score: 215.4
    The Human Tissue Act 2004 is designed to regulate the storage and use of organs and tissues from the living, and the removal, storage and use of the same material from the deceased. It repeals much criticized legislation, including the Human Tissue Act 1961, and establishes a Human Tissue Authority to ensure compliance with the Act via a licensing and monitoring regime. When the Act comes into force, probably in April 2006, it will be a criminal offence not to (...)
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  24. Timothy Morton (2011). Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones. Continent 1 (3):149-155.score: 192.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  25. Christoph Schmidt-Petri (2012). Der mutmaßliche Wille im deutschen Transplantationsgesetz. In M. G. Weiss & H. Greif (eds.), Ethics-Society-Politics. ALWS.score: 166.4
    This paper discusses (in German) an idea enshrined in the recent (2012) revision of the German transplantation law. The law allows family members to make claims about what the deceased would have wanted to happen to his/her organs/tissue even though he/she never has voiced any relevant opinions. I argue that this is illegitimate.
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  26. Shawn H. E. Harmon (2010). Yearworth V. North Bristol NHS Trust: A Property Case of Uncertain Significance? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):343-350.score: 153.0
    It has long been the position in law that, subject to some minor but important exceptions, property cannot be held in the human body, whether living or dead. In the recent case of Yearworth and Others v North Bristol NHS Trust, however, the Court of Appeal for England and Wales revisited the property debate and threw into doubt a number of doctrines with respect to property and the body. This brief article analyses Yearworth, (1) reviewing the facts and the Court’s (...)
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  27. Jacqueline A. Laing (2005). The Right to Live: Reply to the Chief Executive of the Law Society. Law Society Gazette 102:11.score: 152.0
    The chief executive of the Law Society proposes that the Mental Capacity Bill is a progressive initiative enhancing personal autonomy. Laing replies to this by showing that the Bill, for from enhancinging personal autonomy explodes it by inviting homicide by unaccountable third parties, allowing non-therapeutic research and organ-removal without consent and creating a secret and unaccountable court with a lethal power over the vulnerable incapacitated.
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  28. F. Anderson, A. Glasier, J. Ross & D. T. Baird (1994). Attitudes of Women to Fetal Tissue Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):36-40.score: 148.0
    The use of human fetal tissue for scientific research has enormous potential but is subject to government legislation. In the United Kingdom the Polkinghorne Committee's guidelines were accepted by the Department of Health in 1990. These guidelines set out to protect women undergoing termination of pregnancy from exploitation but in so doing may significantly restrict potential research. Although the committee took evidence from a wide variety of experts they did not seek the views of the general public. We asked (...)
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  29. Patricia Roche (2010). The Property/Privacy Conundrum Over Human Tissue. HEC Forum 22 (3):197-209.score: 143.1
    This paper analyzes court rulings on tissue samples as property and critiques objections that have been raised to the recognition of DNA samples as personal property. The cases are: Moore v. Regents of the University of California (1988, 1990), Greenberg v. Miami Children’s Research Institute (2003), and Washington University v.Catalona (2007). The paper argues that it is possible for the law to support both individual privacy and property rights in DNA, recognizing nevertheless that some unresolved questions remain, including what exercising (...)
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  30. Helena Melo, Cristina Brandao, Guilhermina Rego & Rui Nunes (2001). Ethical and Legal Issues in Xenotransplantation. Bioethics 15 (5-6):427-442.score: 126.4
    In most western countries, there is a 'human organ shortage' with waiting lists for the performance of transplantation. In a recent report of the UNOS Ethics Committee it is stated that there are approximately 31,000 potential recipients on waiting lists, but only one fourth of potential donors give their specific consent. Xenotransplantation--defined as the transplantation of animal cells, tissues or organs into human beings--is associated with particular ethical dilemmas, namely the problems of efficiency and safety of this medical (...)
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  31. H. Melo, C. Brandao, G. Rego & R. Nunes (2002). Legal and Ethical Issues in Xenotransplantation. Bioethics 15 (5-6):427-442.score: 126.4
    In most western countries, there is a 'human organ shortage' with waiting lists for the performance of transplantation. In a recent report of the UNOS Ethics Committee it is stated that there are approximately 31,000 potential recipients on waiting lists, but only one fourth of potential donors give their specific consent. Xenotransplantation-defined as the transplantation of animal cells, tissues or organs into human beings-is associated with particular ethical dilemmas, namely the problems of efficiency and safety of this medical (...)
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  32. O. P. Norkowski (2012). Koncepcja śmierci mózgowej w świetle analiz: czy da się ją obronić? Filo-Sofija 12 (19).score: 125.0
    The Brain Death Reconsidered – Is It a Tenable Concept? Since 1968 it has been recognized in the medical practice that irreversible coma connected with apnea can serve as a criterion of human death. This approach was first introduced in the so called Harvard Protocol. As a result of the work of this commission, the brain-based criteria of human death were quickly legally introduced in America and in most countries in the world. The only symptom on which death can be (...)
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  33. Carla Truyers, Eliane Kellen, Marc Arbyn, Leen Trommelmans, Herman Nys, Karen Hensen, Bert Aertgeerts, Stefaan Bartholomeeusen, Mats Hansson & Frank Buntinx (2010). The Use of Human Tissue in Epidemiological Research; Ethical and Legal Considerations in Two Biobanks in Belgium. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):169-175.score: 98.1
    This paper discusses the legal implications of setting up two new biobanks in Belgium. The first is hospital-based and will archive tissue from patients with haematologic cancer, whereas the second is linked to a general practice based morbidity registry and will involve storage of blood samples. To date, Belgium has no specific legislation that regulates storage of human tissue and related databases. Several issues concerning the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal medical data are discussed (...)
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  34. Crystal K. Liu (2007). 'Saviour Siblings'? The Distinction Between PGD with HLA Tissue Typing and Preimplantation HLA Tissue Typing. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):65-70.score: 93.1
    One of the more controversial uses of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) involves selecting embryos with a specific tissue type so that the child to be born can act as a donor to an existing sibling who requires a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. PGD with HLA tissue typing is used to select embryos that are free of a familial genetic disease and that are also a tissue match for an existing sibling who requires a transplant. Preimplantation HLA tissue typing occurs when (...)
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  35. Loane Skene (2007). Legal Rights in Human Bodies, Body Parts and Tissue. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (2):129-133.score: 93.0
    This paper outlines the current common law principles that protect people’s interests in their bodies, excised body parts and tissue without conferring the rights of full legal ownership. It does not include the recent statutory amendments in jurisdictions such as New South Wales and the United Kingdom. It argues that at common law, people do not own their own bodies or excised bodily material. People can authorise the removal of their bodily material and its use, either during life or after (...)
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  36. Catherine Waldby, Ian Kerridge & Loane Skene (2012). Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):15-17.score: 90.0
    Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 15-17 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9351-x Authors Catherine Waldby, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Ian Kerridge, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Medical Foundation Building (K25), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Loane Skene, Faculty of Law and Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Studies, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VA, Australia Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (...)
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  37. R. Harries (2005). Delivering Public Policy: The Status of the Embryo and Tissue Typing. Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (1):57-74.score: 87.0
    The author draws on his own experience of helping to make and deliver public policy to indicate the wider context in which ethical decisions have to be made: the law, contested interpretations of the law which have to be settled in the courts, and wider political and economic factors. He argues that the concept of respect for the early embryo does have substance because of the strict regulatory regime of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA). He considers the arguments (...)
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  38. Michelle A. Mullen & Frederick H. Lowy (1993). Physician Attitudes Toward the Regulation of Fetal Tissue Therapies: Empirical Findings and Implications for Public Policy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (2):241-250.score: 76.3
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  39. Lesley Jean Burgess & Deodanda Pretorius (2013). The South African Clinical Trial Industry: Implications of Problems with the Issuing of Human Tissue Export Permits. South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 6 (1):11.score: 76.3
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  40. J. Savulescu (2013). Elective Ventilation and Interests. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):129-129.score: 76.0
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  41. Donna L. Dickenson (2006). The Lady Vanishes: What's Missing From the Stem Cell Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):43-54.score: 72.0
    Most opponents of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cell technologies base their arguments on the twin assertions that the embryo is either a human being or a potential human being, and that it is wrong to destroy a human being or potential human being in order to produce stem cell lines. Proponents’ justifications of stem cell research are more varied, but not enough to escape the charge of obsession with the status of the embryo. What unites the two (...)
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  42. Sheelagh McGuinness & Margaret Brazier (2008). Respecting the Living Means Respecting the Dead Too. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (2):297-316.score: 68.0
    Why should we respect the wishes which individuals may have about how their body is treated after death? Reflecting on how and why the law respects the bodies of the living, we argue that we must also respect the ‘dead’. We contest the relevance of the argument ‘the dead have no interests’, rather we think that the pertinent argument is ‘the living have interests in what happens to their dead bodies’. And, we advance arguments why we should also respect the (...)
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  43. Ritva Halila (2007). Assessing the Ethics of Medical Research in Emergency Settings: How Do International Regulations Work in Practice? Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):305-313.score: 64.0
    Different ethical principles conflict in research conducted in emergency research. Clinical care and its development should be based on research. Patients in critical clinical condition are in the greatest need of better medicines. The critical condition of the patient and the absence of a patient representative at the critical time period make it difficult and sometimes impossible to request an informed consent before the beginning of the trial. In an emergency, care decisions must be made in a short period of (...)
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  44. A. V. Campbell, S. A. M. McLean, K. Gutridge & H. Harper (2008). Human Tissue Legislation: Listening to the Professionals. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):104-108.score: 63.0
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  45. Christian Lenk, Nils Hoppe, Katharian Beier & Claudia Wiesemann (eds.) (2011). Human Tissue Research. A European Perspective on the Ethical and Legal Challenges. Oxford University Press.score: 51.9
    It will be of value to medics and social scientists, human tissue researchers, and policy makers who have an interest in ethical and legal issues of human tissue research.
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  46. Murat Aydede (2009). Is Feeling Pain the Perception of Something? Journal of Philosophy 106 (10):531-567.score: 45.0
    According to the increasingly popular perceptual/representational accounts of pain (and other bodily sensations such as itches, tickles, orgasms, etc.), feeling pain in a body region is perceiving a non-mental property or some objective condition of that region, typically equated with some sort of (actual or potential) tissue damage. In what follows I argue that given a natural understanding of what sensory perception requires and how it is integrated with (dedicated) conceptual systems, these accounts are mistaken. I will also examine the (...)
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  47. L. O. Gostin (1980). Ethical Considerations of Psychosurgery: The Unhappy Legacy of the Pre-Frontal Lobotomy. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):149-154.score: 45.0
    There is no subject at the interface of law, psychiatry and medical ethics which is more controversial than psychosurgery. The divergent views of the treatment begin with its definition. The World Health Organisation1 and others2 define psychosurgery as the selective surgical removal or destruction of nerve pathways or normal brain tissue with a view to influencing behaviour. However, proponents of psychosurgery demur on the basis that the `modern' treatment is concerned predominantly with emotional illness, without any specific effect upon behaviour. (...)
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  48. T. F. Murphy (2010). Parents' Choices in Banking Boys' Testicular Tissue. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):806-809.score: 45.0
    Researchers are working to derive sperm from banked testicular tissue taken from pre-pubertal boys who face therapies or injuries that destroy sperm production. Success in deriving sperm from this tissue will help to preserve the option for these boys to have genetically related children later in life. For the twin moral reasons of preserving access and equity in regard to having such children, clinicians and researchers are justified in offering the option to the parents of all affected boys. However, some (...)
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  49. Reinhard Merkel & Holm Putzke (2013). After Cologne: Male Circumcision and the Law. Parental Right, Religious Liberty or Criminal Assault? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):444-449.score: 45.0
    Non-therapeutic circumcision violates boys’ right to bodily integrity as well as to self-determination. There is neither any verifiable medical advantage connected with the intervention nor is it painless nor without significant risks. Possible negative consequences for the psychosexual development of circumcised boys (due to substantial loss of highly erogenous tissue) have not yet been sufficiently explored, but appear to ensue in a significant number of cases. According to standard legal criteria, these considerations would normally entail that the operation be deemed (...)
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