Search results for 'Trauma' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Globalizing Disaster Trauma (2000). Science, Culture and Psychiatry After the Kobe Earthquake. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 28 (2):174-197.
  2.  5
    Debra Jackson (2016). Answering the Call: Crisis Intervention and Rape Survivor Advocacy as Witnessing Trauma. In Monica Casper & Eric Wertheimer (eds.), Critical Trauma Studies: Understanding Violence, Conflict and Memory in Everyday Life. New York University Press 205-226.
    This chapter focuses on the practice of witnessing from the perspective of a crisis counselor and rape survivor advocate. Weaving together threads of practice and theory, it describes the experience of witnessing others’ trauma, and the asymmetrical process of being an empathic and ethical participant in the recovery of others’ subjectivity. The chapter explores the impact of trauma on a person’s embodied, autonomous, and narrative self, including loss of speech, symptoms recognized in psychiatric literature as PTSD, and anxiety. (...)
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  3. Robin S. Brown (2015). An Opening: Trauma and Transcendence. Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches 7 (1):72-80.
    With reference to the intergenerational theorizing of trauma, this article considersthe role of transcendence in the substance of our theoretical ideas about psycho-sis. Arguing against an emphasis on notions of developmental de fi cit, the author considers the recent work of Davoine and Gaudilliere as a means of questioningsome of the paradigmatic assumptions of clinical psychology. It is suggested that the relationship between psychosis and spirituality has often been conceived insuch a way as to depreciate both, and that a (...)
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  4.  30
    Yochai Ataria (2015). Dissociation During Trauma: The Ownership-Agency Tradeoff Model. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):1037-1053.
    Dissociation during trauma lacks an adequate definition. Using data obtained from interviews with 36 posttraumatic individuals conducted according to the phenomenological approach, this paper seeks to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In particular, it suggesting a trade off model depicting the balance between the sense of agency and the sense of ownership : a reciprocal relationship appears to exist between these two, and in order to enable control of the body during trauma the sense of ownership must (...)
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  5. Karyn L. Freedman (2006). The Epistemological Significance of Psychic Trauma. Hypatia 21 (2):104-125.
    This essay explores the epistemological significance of the kinds of beliefs that grow out of traumatic experiences, such as the rape survivor's belief that she is never safe. On current theories of justification, beliefs like this one are generally dismissed due to either insufficient evidence or insufficient propositional content. Here, Freedman distinguishes two discrete sides of the aftermath of psychic trauma, the shattered self and the shattered worldview. This move enables us to see these beliefs as beliefs; in other (...)
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  6.  16
    Gretchen Gusich (2012). A Phenomenology of Emotional Trauma: Around and About the Things Themselves. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (4):505-518.
    This paper seeks to provide a noetic analysis of emotional trauma. It highlights three essential features of trauma, as well as one non-essential feature, and attempts to make sense of them phenomenologically. The first essential feature of trauma that the paper considers is the disbelief that pervades traumatic experience. When traumatized, we cannot believe that the traumatic event has taken place. This is because we will, not for the event not to have happened—we cannot will something that (...)
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  7.  13
    Mark Cresswell & Zulfia Karimova (2013). 'Misfortune's Image': The Cinematic Representation of Trauma in Robert Bresson's Mouchette (1967). Film-Philosophy 17 (1):154-176.
    This paper asks questions about 'trauma' and its cultural representation specifically, trauma's representation in the cinema. In this respect, it compares and contrasts the work of Robert Bresson, in particular his 1967 masterpiece, Mouchette , with contemporary Hollywood film. James Mangold's 1999 'Oscar-winning' Girl, Interrupted offers an interesting example for cultural comparison. In both Mouchette and Girl, Interrupted the subject matter includes, amongst other traumatic experiences, rape, childhood abuse and suicide. The paper ponders the question of whether such (...)
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  8.  19
    Fred Ribkoff & Paul Tyndall (2011). On the Dialectics of Trauma in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):325-337.
    Blanche DuBois, the tragic heroine of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire , has always been read as either “mad” from the start of the play or as a character who descends into “madness.” We argue that Streetcar adumbrates elements of trauma theory, specifically symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder such as involuntary reliving of traumatic events, dissociation, guilt, shame, denial, the shattering of the self, the compulsion to repeat the story of trauma, as well as the early stages (...)
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  9.  17
    Victoria Bates (2012). 'Misery Loves Company': Sexual Trauma, Psychoanalysis and the Market for Misery. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):61-81.
    This article examines sexual ‘misery memoirs’, focusing on author/reader and genre/market relationships in the context of models of trauma and child sexual abuse. It shows that the success of sexual ‘misery memoirs’ is inextricably bound up with the popular dissemination of a feminist-psychoanalytic model of traumatic memory that has taken place since the 1970s. It also argues that, as the ‘truth’ of recovered and traumatic memories has been fundamental to its success, anxieties about false memory and hoax ‘misery memoirs’ (...)
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  10.  22
    Kiene Brillenburg Wurth (2007). The Musicality of the Past: Sehnsucht, Trauma, and the Sublime. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2):219-247.
    This paper argues that the sublime feeling can only announce itself as a paradoxical mixture of pain and pleasure in an experience of a lost or irrevocable past. Presenting the typical evanescence and inevitable deferral of the past in musical terms, this paper rewrites the sublime feeling as a musical feeling: a suspended feeling wavering in-between apparently opposite intensities of tension and respite. This suspended feeling is analyzed through a juxtaposition of the sublime with Sehnsucht, or the potentially endless longing (...)
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  11.  2
    Mehmet Ozan Asik & Aykan Erdemir (2010). Westernization as Cultural Trauma: Egyptian Radical Islamist Discourse on Religious Education. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):111-132.
    In this article, the relation between the Westernization experience and the radical Islamists reaction in Egypt is examined. It is argued that it is necessary to focus on the historical imagination of Westernization to understand the Egyptian reaction as manifested in Islamist religious educational discourse. The historical imagination appears to be based on a traumatic experience which was triggered by a traumatic event, namely British colonialism. The religious educational discourse in Egypt, an opportune case to observe radical Islamist response to (...)
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  12. Gwen Adshead, Annie Bartlett & Gill Mezey (2009). Reponses to Violence and Trauma: The Case of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. OUP Oxford
    Chapter 9 describes and evaluates the relatively recent mental health models of the impact of trauma, and discusses the ways that traumatic events affect people, the political and cultural effects of understanding these consequences as ‘disorder’, particularly as Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and concludes by looking at the relevance of the concept of PTSD to forensic populations.
     
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  13. Dorota Kubacka-Jasiecka (2016). Kryzys emocjonalny i trauma szansą na rozwój i potęgowanie zdrowia. Wątpliwości i pytania. Rocznik Filozoficzny Ignatianum 22 (1):51-89.
    This study discusses the issue of emotional crisis and trauma in terms of opportunities to develop and grow. The article seeks to show the complex psychological conditions pertaining to emotional crises, a constructive way of dealing with them, and the possibility of growing and developing thanks to having experienced such a crisis. These issues are usually omitted when describing crises; however, as the author postulates, they constitute a foundation for differentiating — as we surely must do — between emotional (...)
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  14. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Aesthetics as Investigation of Self, Subject, and Ethical Agency Under Trauma in Kawabata's Post-War Novel The Sound of the Mountain. Philosophy and Literature.
    Yasunari Kawabata’s 1952 novel The Sound of the Mountain is widely praised for its aesthetic qualities, from its adaptation of aesthetics from the Tale of Genji, through the beauty of its prose and the patterning of its images, to the references to arts and nature within the text. This article, by contrast, shows that Kawabata uses these features to demonstrate the effects of the mass trauma following the Second World War and the complicated grief it induced, on the psychology (...)
     
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  15.  19
    Michael S. Roth (2011). Memory, Trauma, and History: Essays on Living with the Past. Columbia University Press.
    Remembering forgetting : Maladies de la Mémoire in nineteenth-century France -- Dying of the past : medical studies of nostalgia in nineteenth-century France -- Hysterical remembering -- Trauma, representation, and historical consciousness -- Trauma : a dystopia of the spirit -- Falling into history : Freud's case of 'Frau Emmy von N.' -- Why Freud haunts us -- Why Warburg now? -- Classic postmodernism : Keith Jenkins -- Ebb tide : Frank Ankersmit -- The art of losing oneself (...)
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  16.  40
    Yochai Ataria (2015). Sense of Ownership and Sense of Agency During Trauma. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):199-212.
    This paper seeks to describe and analyze the traumatic experience through an examination of the sense of agency—the sense of controlling one’s body, and sense of ownership—the sense that it is my body that undergoes experiences. It appears that there exist two levels of traumatic experience: on the first level one loses the sense of agency but retains the sense of ownership, whilst on the second one loses both of these, with symptoms becoming progressively more severe. A comparison of the (...)
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  17. Shaun Halovic (2016). Effective Therapeutic Relationships Using Psychodynamic Psychotherapy in the Face of Trauma. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):159-160.
    The case of Xiang as described by Jane Carroll is indeed disconcerting well beyond the immediately apparent factors contained within the article. While Xiang’s direct medical expenses are excessive and his inability to pay for those expenses and further support his noncustodial family seem to be the main issues up for debate, Xiang, however, is likely going to need much more psychosocial support if he is to regain his previous independent functionality or retain any aspect of a quality of life (...)
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  18.  12
    Christopher Mole (2016). A Methodological Flaw in ‘The Neural Basis of Flashback Formation: The Impact of Viewing Trauma’. Psychological Medicine 46 (8):1785-1786.
    In their 2013 study of traumatic flashback formation, Bourne, Mackay and Holmes raise the question of whether the propensity of a traumatic experience to produce flashbacks is determined by the emotions that are felt at the time of that experience. They suggest that it is not, but the grounds on which they make this suggestion are flawed. Further research is required. That research will need to overcome a significant methodological difficulty — one which is hard to avoid when fMRI data (...)
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  19. Jerome A. Miller (2009). The Trauma of Evil and the Traumatological Conception of Forgiveness. Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):401-419.
    In recent years there has been widespread interest in assimilating forgiveness into a rational conception of the moral life. This project usually construes forgiveness as a way of “moving past” evil and resuming the moral narrative it disrupted. But to develop a philosophical sound conception of forgiveness, we must recognize that moral evil is world-shattering and cannot be assimilated into the moral narrative of our lives. It is not an event that happens in one’s world but to one’s world. In (...)
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  20.  13
    Sara E. Lewis (2013). Trauma and the Making of Flexible Minds in the Tibetan Exile Community. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 41 (3):313-336.
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  21.  17
    Birgit Linder (2011). Trauma and Truth: Representations of Madness in Chinese Literature. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):291-303.
    With only a few exceptions, the literary theme of madness has long been a domain of Western cultural studies. Much of Western writing represents madness as an inquiry into the deepest recesses of the mind, while the comparatively scarce Chinese tradition is generally defined by madness as a voice of social truth. This paper looks at five works of twentieth-century Chinese fiction that draw on socio-somatic aspects of madness to reflect upon social truths, suggesting that the inner voice of subjectivity (...)
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  22.  1
    Ezzat Moghazy & Quinette Louw (2012). Validation of a New Outcome Measure for Orthopaedic Trauma Inpatients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):567-571.
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  23. Jody M. Davies (2001). Back to the Future in Psychoanalysis: Trauma, Dissociation, and the Nature of Unconscious Processes. In Muriel Dimen & Adrienne Harris (eds.), Storms in Her Head: Freud and the Construction of Hysteria. Other Press 245-264.
     
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  24. Christian Schneider (2000). Trauma Und Kritik Zur Generationengeschichte der Kritischen Theorie.
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  25.  93
    Jennifer Yusin (2011). Beyond Nationalism: The Border, Trauma and Partition Fiction. Thesis Eleven 105 (1):23-34.
    This article aims to rethink the trauma of the 1947 Partition of British India through the figure of the border. It is at the border that we can see how the present is as much constituted by the concentration of new realities that call for shifting frameworks of understanding as it is by past events that continue to haunt memory. It undertakes this task through a close reading of the trope of borders in Saadat Hasan Manto’s 1953 short story, (...)
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  26. Mara Miller (2013). Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part II: Suggestions for Teaching About the Atomic Bombings, with Particular Attention to Middle School. The Clearing House 86 (05):164-173.
    In a companion article, “Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part I: Japanese Nuclear Trauma And Resistance To The Atomic Bomb” (this issue), I argue that we need to teach about the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, even though the material is difficult emotionally as well as intellectually. Because of the nature of the information, this topic can be as difficult for graduate students (and their professors!) as for younger students. Teaching about the atomic bombings, however, demands special (...)
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  27. Jill Bennett (2005). Empathic Vision: Affect, Trauma, and Contemporary Art. Stanford University Press.
    This book analyzes contemporary visual art produced in the context of conflict and trauma from a range of countries, including Colombia, Northern Ireland, South Africa, and Australia. It focuses on what makes visual language unique, arguing that the "affective" quality of art contributes to a new understanding of the experience of trauma and loss. By extending the concept of empathy, it also demonstrates how we might, through art, make connections with people in different parts of the world whose (...)
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  28. Mark Silcox (2014). Psychological Trauma and the Simulated Self. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (3):349-364.
    In the 1980s, there was a significant upsurge in diagnoses of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Ian Hacking suggests that the roots of this tendency lie in the excessive willingness of psychologists past and present to engage in the “psychologization of trauma.” I argue that Hacking makes some philosophically problematic assumptions about the putative threat to human autonomy that is posed by the increasing availability, attractiveness, and plausibility of various forms of simulated experience. I also suggest how a different set of (...)
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  29.  71
    Andrea Nicki (2001). The Abused Mind: Feminist Theory, Psychiatric Disability, and Trauma. Hypatia 16 (4):80-104.
    I show how much psychiatric disability is informed by trauma, marginalization, sexist norms, social inequalities, concepts of irrationality and normalcy, oppositional mind-body dualism, and mainstream moral values. Drawing on feminist discussion of physical disability, I present a feminist theory of psychiatric disability that serves to liberate not only those who are psychiatrically disabled but also the mind and moral consciousness restricted in their ranges of rational possibilities.
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  30.  71
    Mara Miller (2013). Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part I: Teaching About Japanese Nuclear Trauma And Resistance To The Atomic Bomb. The Clearing HouseHouse 86 (05):157-163.
    This article discusses twelve reasons that we must teach about the 1945 American atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As with Holocaust studies, we must teach this material even though it is both emotionally and intellectually difficult—in spite of our feelings of repugnance and/or grief, and our concerns regarding students’ potential distress (“tertiary trauma”). To handle such material effectively, we should keep in mind ten objectives: 1) to expand students' knowledge about the subject along with the victims’ experience of (...)
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  31. Hiro Saito (2006). Reiterated Commemoration: Hiroshima as National Trauma. Sociological Theory 24 (4):353 - 376.
    This article examines historical transformations of Japanese collective memory of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima by utilizing a theoretical framework that combines a model of reiterated problem solving and a theory of cultural trauma. I illustrate how the event of the nuclear fallout in March 1954 allowed actors to consolidate previously fragmented commemorative practices into a master frame to define the postwar Japanese identity in terms of transnational commemoration of "Hiroshima." I also show that nationalization of trauma of (...)
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  32.  8
    Elke Geraerts, Elke Smeets, Marko Jelicic, Jaap van Heerden & Harald Merckelbach (2005). Fantasy Proneness, but Not Self-Reported Trauma is Related to DRM Performance of Women Reporting Recovered Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):602-612.
    Extending a strategy previously used by Clancy, Schacter, McNally, and Pitman , we administered a neutral and a trauma-related version of the Deese–Roediger–McDermott paradigm to a sample of women reporting recovered or repressed memories of childhood sexual abuse , women reporting having always remembered their abuse , and women reporting no history of abuse . We found that individuals reporting recovered memories of CSA are more prone than other participants to falsely recalling and recognizing neutral words that were never (...)
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  33.  9
    Rebecca Collins (2005). Posthumous Reproduction and the Presumption Against Consent in Cases of Death Caused by Sudden Trauma. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):431 – 442.
    The deceased's prior consent to posthumous reproduction is a common requirement in many common law jurisdictions. This paper critically evaluates four arguments advanced to justify the presumption against consent. It is argued that, in situations where death is caused by sudden trauma, not only is there inadequate justification for the presumption against consent, but there are good reasons to reverse the presumption. The article concludes that the precondition of prior consent may be inappropriate in these situations.
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  34.  5
    J. McKinstry (2013). Perpetual Bodily Trauma: Wounding and Memory in the Middle English Romances. Medical Humanities 39 (1):59-64.
    In the 21st century, the concept of trauma is deeply ingrained in psychological discourse despite the term's origins in literal, physical wounding and affecting experience. However, to understand the sources or causes of trauma, psychologists recognise the paramount importance of somatic evidence. The body provides corporeal systems for inputs that might trigger a later remembrance which might be auditory, visual, even tactile. The same body will continue to experience the trauma throughout its life, only alleviated, perhaps, by (...)
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  35.  12
    MaryCatherine McDonald (2012). Trauma, Embodiment, and Narrative. Idealistic Studies 42 (2):247-263.
    We do not always survive trauma. Elie Wiesel said of Primo Levi, a holocaust survivor who committed suicide at age sixty-seven, “[he] died at Auschwitz forty years earlier.” Though Levi physically survived the holocaust, psychically he did not. And yet, there are countless stories of incredible triumph over trauma. What makes survival possible? What seems to separate those who recover from those who do not—at least in part—is the capacity and opportunity for adaptation. Adaptation is the phenomenon whereby (...)
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  36.  37
    Kris Coffield (2012). Terror, Trauma, and the Thing at Ground Zero. Evental Aesthetics 1 (3):23-32.
    Ten years after the assault on the World Trade Center, the National September 11 Memorial and Museum was opened to the public. Built amidst the busy financial corridors of Lower Manhattan, the memorial was designed to provide a tranquil space for honoring those who perished in the terror attacks. Yet reading the 9/11 Memorial in terms of public remembrance fails to account for either the ontopolitical impact of the attacks as an event that continues to unfold or the contingent relationship (...)
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  37.  19
    T. Brennen, R. Dybdahl & A. KApidzic (2007). Trauma-Related and Neutral False Memories in War-Induced Posttraumatic Stress Disorder☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):877-885.
    Recent models of cognition in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder predict that trauma-related, but not neutral, processing should be differentially affected in these patients, compared to trauma-exposed controls. This study compared a group of 50 patients with PTSD related to the war in Bosnia and a group of 50 controls without PTSD but exposed to trauma from the war, using the DRM method to induce false memories for war-related and neutral critical lures. While the groups were equally susceptible to (...)
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  38.  6
    Paul H. Lysaker, Andrew Gumley, Martin Brüne, Stijn Vanheule, Kelly D. Buck & Giancarlo Dimaggio (2011). Deficits in the Ability to Recognize One’s Own Affects and Those of Others: Associations with Neurocognition, Symptoms and Sexual Trauma Among Persons with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1183-1192.
    While many with schizophrenia experience deficits in metacognition it is unclear whether those deficits are related to other features of illness. To explore this issue, the current study classified participants with schizophrenia as possessing a deficit in both awareness of their own emotions and those of others , aware of their own emotions but unaware of the emotions of others and aware of their own emotions and of other’s emotions . Groups were compared on assessments of neurocognitive function, symptoms, and (...)
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  39.  25
    Mary R. Harvey & Judith Lewis Herman (1994). Amnesia, Partial Amnesia, and Delayed Recall Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):295-306.
    Clinical experience suggests that adult survivors of childhood trauma arrive at their memories in a number of ways, with varying degrees of associated distress and uncertainty and, in some cases, after memory lapses of varying duration and extent. Among those patients who enter psychotherapy as a result of early abuse, three general patterns of traumatic recall are identified: relatively continuous and complete recall of childhood abuse experiences coupled with changing interpretations of these experiences, partial amnesia for abuse events, accompanied (...)
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  40.  1
    Jennifer O. Gammage (2016). Trauma and Historical Witnessing: Hope for Malabou's New Wounded. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (3):404-413.
    Catherine Malabou in The New Wounded develops a general theory of trauma by extending her account of destructive plasticity to the realm of post-traumatic stress disorder. “The new wounded,” she claims, “all come together around a single fact: the radical rupture that trauma introduces in the psyche”. This rupture is demonstrated by an affective fissure, which renders traumatized persons emotionally and socially mute, and a temporal fissure, which punctures subjects’ relationships to their pasts, thus tearing them from any (...)
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  41.  30
    Lisa DeMarni Cromer, Jennifer J. Freyd, Angela K. Binder, Anne P. DePrince & Kathryn Becker-Blease (2006). What's the Risk in Asking? Participant Reaction to Trauma History Questions Compared with Reaction to Other Personal Questions. Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):347 – 362.
    Does asking about trauma history create participant distress? If so, how does it compare with reactions to other personal questions? Do participants consider trauma questions important compared to other personal questions? Using 2 undergraduate samples (Ns = 240 and 277), the authors compared participants' reactions to trauma questions with their reactions to other possibly invasive questions through a self-report survey. Trauma questions caused relatively minimal distress and were perceived as having greater importance and greater cost-benefit ratings (...)
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  42.  7
    Jonathan W. Schooler (1994). Seeking the Core: The Issues and Evidence Surrounding Recovered Accounts of Sexual Trauma. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):452-469.
    This review identifies some of the many layers that surround and potentially obscure the emotionally charged topic of recovered accounts of childhood abuse. Consideration of the, admittedly often indirect, evidence provides suggestive support for many of the components of both recovered and fabricated memories of abuse. With respect to recovered memories the available evidence suggests that: although the prior accessibility of a memory may be difficult to determine, recovered memory reports can sometimes be corroborated with respect to their correspondence to (...)
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  43.  10
    Isabel Gay A. Bradshaw (2004). Not by Bread Alone: Symbolic Loss, Trauma, and Recovery in Elephant Communities. Society and Animals 12 (2):143-158.
    Like many humans in the wake of genocide and war, most wildlife today has sustained trauma. High rates of mortality, habitat destruction, and social breakdown precipitated by human actions are unprecedented in history. Elephants are one of many species dramatically affected by violence. Although elephant communities have processes, rituals, and social structures for responding to trauma—grieving, mourning, and socialization—the scale, nature, and magnitude of human violence have disrupted their ability to use these practices. Absent the cultural, carrier groups (...)
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  44.  27
    Jennifer J. Freyd (1994). Betrayal Trauma: Traumatic Amnesia as an Adaptive Response to Childhood Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):307 – 329.
    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that psychogenic amnesia is an adaptive response to childhood abuse. When a parent or other powerful figure violates a fundamental ethic of human relationships, victims may need to remain unaware of the trauma not to reduce suffering but rather to promote survival. Amnesia enables the child to maintain an attachment with a figure vital to survival, development, and thriving. Analysis of evolutionary pressures, mental modules, social cognitions, and developmental needs suggests that the degree to (...)
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  45.  20
    Amit Pinchevski (2012). The Audiovisual Unconscious: Media and Trauma in the Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies. Critical Inquiry 39 (1):142-166.
    Since its establishment in 1979, the Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University has given rise to numerous studies on history, memory and trauma in the wake of the Holocaust. While acknowledging its audiovisual nature, previous accounts have nevertheless failed to consider the significance of this novel archival formation and how it shapes the production and reception of survivors’ testimonies. This article occasions an unlikely encounter between the trauma and testimony discourse as developed by Dori Laub, Shoshana (...)
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  46.  19
    Howard Zehr (2009). The Intersection of Restorative Justice with Trauma Healing, Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 18 (1/2):20-30.
    Although it originated in criminal justice, restorative justice is essentially a peacebuilding or conflict transformation approach to justice. The crossdisciplinary experience at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding has suggested some important lessons for restorative justice, peacebuilding and related fields. These include the role of trauma and victimization in justice and peacebuilding; the significance of justice questions in trauma and conflict resolution; the importance of addressing responsibilities as well as needs; the role of shame, storytelling and empathy; the (...)
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  47.  30
    Elyse Amend, Linda Kay & Rosemary C. Reilly (2012). Journalism on the Spot: Ethical Dilemmas When Covering Trauma and the Implications for Journalism Education. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (4):235-247.
    When covering traumatic events, novice journalists frequently face situations they are rarely prepared to resolve. This paper highlights ethical dilemmas faced by journalists who participated in a focus group exploring the news media's trauma coverage. Major themes included professional obligations versus ethical responsibilities, journalists' perceived status and roles, permissible harms, and inexperience. Instructional classroom simulations based on experiential learning theory can bridge the gap between the theory of ethical trauma reporting and realities journalists face when covering events that (...)
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  48.  2
    Mara Miller (2016). Aesthetics as Investigation of Self, Subject, and Ethical Agency in Postwar Trauma in Kawabata's The Sound of the Mountain. Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):122-141.
    It is widely assumed that, with a few notable exceptions, Japanese literature, and especially the work of novelist Yasunari Kawabata, focuses on beauty, emotion, and psychology, and that this focus is at the expense of moral or ethical exploration.Kawabata was Japan’s first winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, so to misunderstand his work so fundamentally is not just a matter for aficionados of arcana. The mistake deprives the international reading public of an important philosophical resource for understanding the modern (...)
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  49. Gregg M. Horowitz (2009). A Late Adventure of the Feelings: Loss, Trauma, and the Limits of Psychoanalysis. In Kristen Brown & Bettina Bergo (eds.), The Trauma Controversy: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Dialogues. Suny Press 23--44.
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    Russell Meares (2000). Intimacy and Alienation: Memory, Trauma and Personal Being. Brunner-Routledge.
    Intimacy and Alienation puts forward the author's unique paradigm for psychotherapy and counselling based on the assumption that each patient has suffered a disruption of the `self', and that the goal of the therapist is to identify and work with that disruption. Using many clinical illustrations, and drawing on self psychology, attachment therapy and theories of trauma, Russell Meares looks at the nature of self and how it develops, before going on to explore the form and feeling of experience (...)
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