Search results for 'Trevon Fuller' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Trevon Fuller (2003). The Integrative Biology of Phenotypic Plasticity. Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):381-389.score: 240.0
  2. Sahotra Sarkar & Trevon Fuller, Generalized Norms of Reaction for Ecological Developmental Biology.score: 240.0
    A standard norm of reaction (NoR) is a graphical depiction of the phenotypic value of some trait of an individual genotype in a population as a function of an environmental parameter. NoRs thus depict the phenotypic plasticity of a trait. The topological properties of NoRs for sets of different genotypes can be used to infer the presence of (non-linear) genotype-environment interactions. While it is clear that many NoRs are adaptive, it is not yet settled whether their evolutionary etiology should be (...)
     
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  3. Steve Fuller (2001). A Fuller Vision of Thomas Kuhn: Response to Roth and Mirowski. History of the Human Sciences 14 (2):111-117.score: 180.0
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  4. Steve Fuller (2009). Book Reviews: Dissent Over Dissent: Reply to Richards Steve Fuller, Dissent Over Descent: Intelligent Design's Challenge to Darwinism. Thriplow, Cambs: Icon Books, 2008. V + 272 Pp. ISBN: 978-1840468-04-5. £12.99. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):117-122.score: 180.0
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  5. Steve Fuller (2009). In Search of Sociological Foundations for the Project of Humanity Steve Fuller, The New Sociological Imagination. London: Sage Publications, 2006. History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):138-145.score: 180.0
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  6. Steve Fuller (2004). The Case of Fuller Vs Kuhn. Social Epistemology 18 (1):3 – 49.score: 180.0
  7. David Mercer, Jerry Ravetz, Stephen P. Turner & Steve Fuller (2005). A Parting Shot at Misunderstanding: Fuller Vs. Kuhn. [REVIEW] Metascience 14 (1):3-152.score: 180.0
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  8. R. Buckminster Fuller (1979). R. Buckminster Fuller on Education. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 180.0
     
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  9. R. Buckminster Fuller (1973). R. Buckminster Fuller. Minnesota Public Radio.score: 180.0
     
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  10. R. Buckminster Fuller (1967). R. Buckminster Fuller Thinks Aloud, Part. Credo.score: 180.0
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  11. Thomas Fuller (1938). Thomas Fuller's the Holy State and the Profane State. New York, Columbia University Press.score: 180.0
    I. Introduction, notes, and appendix -- II. A facsimile of the first edition, 1642, reduced in size.
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  12. Lon L. Fuller (2001). The Principles of Social Order: Selected Essays of Lon L. Fuller. Hart Pub..score: 180.0
     
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  13. Lon L. Fuller (1966/1999). The Law in Quest of Itself. Lawbook Exchange.score: 60.0
    Fuller, Lon L. The Law in Quest of Itself.
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  14. Steve Fuller (2006). The Philosophy of Science and Technology Studies. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Science and Technology Studies (STS) is a broad, interdisciplinary, and rapidly growing field that explores the relationship between science, technology and the ways they shape society and our understanding of the world. But as the field has become more established, it has increasingly hidden its philosophical roots. While the trend is typical of disciplines striving for maturity, Steve Fuller, a leading figure in the field, argues that STS has much to lose if it abandons philosophy. He argues that the (...)
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  15. Steve Fuller (2011). A Response to Mike Thike (2011). Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):75-78.score: 60.0
    First, I would like to thank Mike Thicke (2011) for his very perceptive and civil review of Science: The Art of Living. He himself alludes to the difficulty that reviewers have had with my previous books defending intelligent design as a necessary condition for the possibility of science, a point I have discussed in this journal (Fuller 2008b). Fuller (2010) has no less polarised reviewers. Here readers are invited to contrast the rather sophisticated critical review of Science that (...)
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  16. Steve Fuller, Review of Intellectual Impostures. [REVIEW]score: 60.0
    This is the follow-up book to the notorious Sokal Hoax. It includes the original article that appeared in the Spring 1996 issue of Social Text, along with an explication of all the relatively minor errors and jokes planted in the article that would have been caught by the cognoscenti in physics. That alone has been sufficient to attract global media attention about the alleged lack of quality control in cultural studies scholarship. However, Sokal and Bricmont are out for bigger game. (...)
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  17. Robert C. Fuller (2008). Spirituality in the Flesh: Bodily Sources of Religious Experiences. OUP Usa.score: 60.0
    In Spirituality in the Flesh, Robert C. Fuller investigates how our sensory organs, emotional programs, sexual sensibilities, and neural structures shape religious phenomena. Comfortable with the language of scientific analysis and sympathetic to the inherently subjective aspects of religious events, Fuller introduces the biological study of religion by joining our unprecedented understanding of bodily states with an experts knowledge of religious phenomena. Culling insights from scientific observations, historical allusions, and literary references, Spirituality in the Flesh provides fresh understandings (...)
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  18. Robert C. Fuller (1986). Americans and the Unconscious. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Beginning with Emerson and the Transcendentalists, Americans have tended to view the unconscious as the psychological faculty through which individuals might come to experience a higher spiritual realm. On the whole, American psychologists see the unconscious as a symbol of harmony, restoration and revitalization, imbuing it with the capacity to restore peace between the individual and an immanent spiritual power. Americans and the Unconscious studies the symbolic dimensions of American psychology, tracing the historical development of the concept of the unconscious (...)
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  19. Steve Fuller (2013). On Commodification and the Progress of Knowledge in Society: A Defence. Spontaneous Generations 7 (1):12-20.score: 60.0
    In this paper I make more explicit a position that I have being advocating for more than two decades, though its full force does not seem to have been felt. I write in defence of the *commodification* rather than the simple *commercialisation* of knowledge. The two italicised terms are often spoken about in the same breath—and, to be sure, they are related to each other. But they are not the same. Commercialisation refers to the subjection of social life to the (...)
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  20. Steve Fuller (1994). The Social Epistemologist in Search of a Position From Which to Argue. Argumentation 8 (2):163-183.score: 60.0
    The relevance of Fuller's version of social epistemology to argumentation theory is highlighted, in response to critics who claim that I am not sufficiently critical of the social grounds of knowledge production. Responding to Lyne, I first consider the strengths and weaknesses of relying on economic images to capture the social. Then, I tackle two contrary objections: Brian Baigrie claims social epistemology is “not social enough,” while Angelo Corlett wonders whether it may be “too social.” Finally, I counter Malcolm (...)
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  21. Steve Fuller (2014). Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The theory of knowledge, or epistemology, is often regarded as a dry topic that bears little relation to actual knowledge practices. Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History addresses this perception by showing the roots, developments and prospects of modern epistemology from its beginnings in the nineteenth century to the present day. Beginning with an introduction to the central questions and problems in theory of knowledge, Steve Fuller goes on to demonstrate that contemporary epistemology is enriched by its interdisciplinarity, analysing (...)
     
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  22. Lisa L. Fuller (2011). Knowing Their Own Good: Preferences & Liberty in Global Ethics. In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Ethics. Palgrave MacMillan 210--230.score: 30.0
    Citizens of liberal, affluent societies are regularly encouraged to support reforms meant to improve conditions for badly-off people in the developing world. Our economic and political support is solicited for causes such as: banning child labor, implementing universal primary education, closing down sweatshops and brothels, etc. But what if the relevant populations or individuals in the developing world do not support these particular reforms or aid programs? What if they would strongly prefer other reforms and programs, or would rank the (...)
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  23. Lon L. Fuller (1956). I. Human Purpose and Natural Law. Journal of Philosophy 53 (22):697-705.score: 30.0
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  24. Lisa L. Fuller (2012). Priority-Setting in International Non-Governmental Organizations: It is Not as Easy as ABCD. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):5-17.score: 30.0
    Recently theorists have demonstrated a growing interest in the ethical aspects of resource allocation in international non-governmental humanitarian, development and human rights organizations (INGOs). This article provides an analysis of Thomas Pogge's proposal for how international human rights organizations ought to choose which projects to fund. Pogge's allocation principle states that ?an INGO should govern its decision making about candidate projects by such rules and procedures as are expected to maximize its long-run cost-effectiveness, defined as the expected aggregate moral value (...)
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  25. Fred Adams, Gary Fuller & Robert Stecker (1997). The Semantics of Fictional Names. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):128–148.score: 30.0
    In this paper we defend a direct reference theory of names. We maintain that the meaning of a name is its bearer. In the case of vacuous names, there is no bearer and they have no meaning. We develop a unified theory of names such that one theory applies to names whether they occur within or outside fiction. Hence, we apply our theory to sentences containing names within fiction, sentences about fiction or sentences making comparisons across fictions. We then defend (...)
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  26. Lisa L. Fuller (2005). Poverty Relief, Global Institutions, and the Problem of Compliance. Journal of Moral Philosophy 2 (3):285-297.score: 30.0
    Thomas Pogge and Andrew Kuper suggest that we should promote an ‘institutional’ solution to global poverty. They advocate the institutional solution because they think that non-governmental organizations (NGOs) can never be the primary agents of justice in the long run. They provide several standard criticisms of NGO aid in support of this claim. However, there is a more serious problem for institutional solutions: how to generate enough goodwill among rich nation-states that they would be willing to commit themselves to supranational (...)
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  27. Steve Fuller (1994). The Reflexive Politics of Constructivism. History of the Human Sciences 7 (1):87-93.score: 30.0
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  28. Steve Fuller (1995). On the Motives for the New Sociology of Science. History of the Human Sciences 8 (2):117-124.score: 30.0
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  29. Steve Fuller (1996). Reviews : C. Fox, R. Porter and R. Wokler (Eds), Inventing Human Science: Eighteenth-Century Domains. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. S. L. Star (Ed.), Ecologies of Knowledge: Work and Politics in Science and Technology. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1995. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 9 (1):122-131.score: 30.0
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  30. Steve Fuller (2002). Karmic Darwinism: The Emerging Alliance Between Science and Religion. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 64 (4):697 - 722.score: 30.0
    I argue that the 21st century will be marked by a realignment of science and religion, which I call the “anthropic” versus the “karmic” perspectives. The former is aligned with the major Western religions and was secularized in the 19th century as positivism, with its identification of social science with the religion of humanity. The latter is aligned with the major Eastern religions, but also Epicureanism in the West. It was secularized as the Neo-Darwinian synthesis in the 20th century, since (...)
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  31. Timothy Fuller (2009). Oakeshott on the Character of Religious Experience: Need There Be a Conflict Between Science and Religion? Zygon 44 (1):153-167.score: 30.0
    Michael Oakeshott reflected on the character of religious experience in various writings throughout his life. In Experience and Its Modes (1933) he analyzed science as a distinctive "mode," or account of experience as a whole, identifying those assumptions necessary for science to achieve its coherent account of experience in contrast to other modes of experience whose quests for coherence depend on different assumptions. Religious experience, he thought, was integral to the practical mode. The latter experiences the world as interminable tension (...)
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  32. Steve Fuller (1995). Review Article : A Tale of Two Cultures and Other Higher Superstitions Paul Gross and Norman Levitt, Higher Superstition: The Academic Left and Its Quarrels with Science. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994. History of the Human Sciences 8 (1):115-125.score: 30.0
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  33. Lisa Fuller (forthcoming). International NGO Health Programs in a Non-Ideal World: Imperialism, Respect & Procedural Justice. In E. Emanuel J. Millum (ed.), Global Justice and Bioethics. Oxford University Pressscore: 30.0
    Many people in the developing world access essential health services either partially or primarily through programs run by international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). Given that such programs are typically designed and run by Westerners, and funded by Western countries and their citizens, it is not surprising that such programs are regarded by many as vehicles for Western cultural imperialism. In this chapter, I consider this phenomenon as it emerges in the context of development and humanitarian aid programs, particularly those delivering medical (...)
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  34. Timothy Fuller & Richard Samuels (2011). Overselling the Case Against Normativism. Brain and Behavioral Sciences 34 (5):255.score: 30.0
    Though we are in broad agreement with much of Elqayam & Evans' (E&E's) position, we criticize two aspects of their argument. First, rejecting normativism is unlikely to yield the benefits that E&E seek. Second, their conception of rational norms is overly restrictive and, as a consequence, their arguments at most challenge a relatively restrictive version of normativism.
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  35. Lon L. Fuller (1969/1977). The Morality of Law. Yale University Press.score: 30.0
    Tthis book is likely to receive its warmest reception form advanced students of the philosophy of law, who will welcome the relief provided from the frequently sterile tone of much recent work in the field.
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  36. Frederick R. Adams, David Drebushenko, Gary Fuller & Robert A. Stecker (1990). Narrow Content: Fodor's Folly. Mind and Language 5 (3):213-29.score: 30.0
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  37. Paul Yu & Gary Fuller (1986). A Critique of Dennett. Synthese 66 (March):453-76.score: 30.0
    This essay is intended to be a systematic exposition and critique of Daniel Dennett's general views. It is divided into three main sections. In section 1 we raise the question of the nature of a plausible scientific psychology, and suggest that the question of whether folk psychology will serve as an adequate scientific psychology is of special relevance in a discussion of Dennett. We then characterize folk psychology briefly. We suggest that Dennett's views have undergone at least one major change, (...)
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  38. Fred Adams & Gary Fuller (2007). Empty Names and Pragmatic Implicatures. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):449-461.score: 30.0
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  39. Steve Fuller (2010). Humanity Without Vico Roger Smith, Being Human: Historical Knowledge and the Creation of Human Nature. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2007. Viii + 288 Pp. ISBN 978-0-7190-7498-1. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):202-206.score: 30.0
  40. S. Fuller (1997). Thomas Kuhn: A Personal Judgement. History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):129-131.score: 30.0
    For the last four years I have been working on a book on the origins and\nimpacts of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolution. I have\nsubtitled the book a ’philosophical history’ because one of my aims is to\nrevive the lost art of passing judgement on history, in this case the history\nof our own times. This is not an easy art to practise even in the best of\ntimes, and ours is not one of them. As I delved more deeply into Kuhn’s\nbackground (...)
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  41. Steve Fuller (2004). The Critique of Intellectuals: A Response to Some Critical Intellectuals. History of the Human Sciences 17 (4):123-130.score: 30.0
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  42. Timothy Fuller (1984). The Tradition of Political Hedonism From Hobbes to J. S. Mill. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):499-501.score: 30.0
  43. Steve Fuller (2010). History of Science for its Own Sake? History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):95-99.score: 30.0
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  44. Lisa Fuller (2012). Burdened Societies and Transitional Justice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):369 - 386.score: 30.0
    Following John Rawls, nonideal theory is typically divided into: (1) "partial-compliance theory" and (2) "transitional theory." The former is concerned with those circumstances in which individuals and political regimes do not fully comply with the requirements of justice, such as when people break the law or some individuals do not do their fair share within a distributive scheme. The latter is concerned with circumstances in which background institutions may be unjust or may not exist at all. This paper focuses on (...)
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  45. Lon L. Fuller (1969). Human Interaction and the Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 14 (1):1-36.score: 30.0
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  46. Steve Fuller (2006). Review of Noretta Koertge (Ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).score: 30.0
    The movement of epistemic standards closer to moral virtue reflects a worrisome trend in the recent renascence of naturalism in philosophy that links access to truth with a deepening sense of the knower's history. While it is relatively harmless to insist that mastery of a scientific specialty requires training in certain techniques, it is more problematic (pace Kuhn) to insist that all such specialists share the same disciplinary narrative -- and still more problematic to require that they pledge allegiance to (...)
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  47. Steve Fuller (1987). On Regulating What is Known: A Way to Social Epistemology. Synthese 73 (1):145 - 183.score: 30.0
    This paper lays the groundwork for normative-yet-naturalistic social epistemology. I start by presenting two scenarios for the history of epistemology since Kant, one in which social epistemology is the natural outcome and the other in which it represents a not entirely satisfactory break with classical theories of knowledge. Next I argue that the current trend toward naturalizing epistemology threatens to destroy the distinctiveness of the sociological approach by presuming that it complements standard psychological and historical approaches. I then try to (...)
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  48. Tim Fuller & Richard Samuels (2014). Scientific Inference and Ordinary Cognition: Fodor on Holism and Cognitive Architecture. Mind and Language 29 (2):201-237.score: 30.0
    Do accounts of scientific theory formation and revision have implications for theories of everyday cognition? We maintain that failing to distinguish between importantly different types of theories of scientific inference has led to fundamental misunderstandings of the relationship between science and everyday cognition. In this article, we focus on one influential manifestation of this phenomenon which is found in Fodor's well-known critique of theories of cognitive architecture. We argue that in developing his critique, Fodor confounds a variety of distinct claims (...)
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  49. B. A. G. Fuller (1949). The Messes Animals Make in Metaphysics. Journal of Philosophy 46 (26):829-838.score: 30.0
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  50. Steve Fuller (2014). The Higher Whitewash. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (1):86-101.score: 30.0
    An assessment of Joel Isaac’s recent, well-researched attempt to provide a context for the emergence of Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. That context consisted in the open space for cross-disciplinary projects between the natural and social sciences that existed at Harvard during the presidency of James Bryant Conant, from the early 1930s to the early 1950s. Isaac’s work at the Harvard archives adds interesting detail to a story whose general contours are already known. In particular, he reinforces the view (...)
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