Search results for 'Trinity' (try it on Scholar)

692 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Kathleen L. Trinity (College of the Canyons)
  1. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2003). Trinity Monotheism. Philosophia Christi 5 (2):375 - 403.score: 24.0
    Reprinted in Philosophical and Theological Essays on the Trinity, Oxford, 2009, eds Michael Rea and Thomas McCall. In this essay, I assess a certain version of ’social Trinitarianism’ put forward by J. P. Moreland and William Lane Craig, ’trinity monotheism’. I first show how their response to a familiar anti-Trinitarian argument arguably implies polytheism. I then show how they invoke three tenets central to their trinity monotheism in order to avoid that implication. After displaying these tenets more (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Daniel Howard-Snyder, Trinity. The Routledge Online Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    This 9,000+ word entry briefly assesses five models of the Trinity, those espoused by (i) Richard Swinburne, (ii) William Lane Craig, (iii) Brian Leftow, (iv) Jeff Brower and Michael Rea, and (v) Peter van Inwagen.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard Rice (2007). Trinity, Temporality, and Open Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):321-328.score: 24.0
    A number of thinkers today, including open theists, find reasons to attribute temporality to God. According to Robert W. Jenson, the Trinity is indispensable to a Christian concept of God, and divine temporality is essential to the meaning of the Trinity. Following the lead of early Christian thought, Jenson argues that the persons of the Trinity are relations, and these relations are temporal. Jenson’s insights are obscured, however, by problematic references to time as a sphere to which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Einar Duenger Bohn (2011). The Logic of the Trinity. Sophia 50 (3):363-374.score: 24.0
    Roughly, the problem of the Trinity is the problem of how God can be one and yet be the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, which are three, not one. That one thing is identical with three distinct things seems to violate traditional laws of identity. I propose a solution to this problem according to which it is just an ordinary claim of one-many identity. For example, one pair of shoes is identical with two shoes; and my one (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. H. E. Baber (2008). Trinity, Filioque and Semantic Ascent. Sophia 47 (2):149 - 160.score: 24.0
    It is difficult to reconcile claims about the Father's role as the progenitor of Trinitarian Persons with commitment to the equality of the persons, a problem that is especially acute for Social Trinitarians. I propose a metatheological account of the doctrine of the Trinity that facilitates the reconciliation of these two claims. On the proposed account, ‘Father’ is systematically ambiguous. Within economic contexts, those which characterize God's relation to the world, ‘Father’ refers to the First Person of the (...); within theological contexts, which purport to describe intra-Trinitarian relations, it refers to the Trinity in toto-thus in holding that the Son and Holy Spirit proceed from the Father we affirm that the Trinity is the source and unifying principle of Trinitarian Persons. While this account is solves a nagging problem for Social Trinitarians it is theologically minimalist to the extent that it is compatible with both Social Trinitarianism and Latin Trinitarianism, and with heterodox Modalist and Tri-theist doctrines as well. Its only theological cost is incompatibility with the Filioque Clause, the doctrine that the Holy Spirit proceeds from both the Father and the Son—and arguably that may be a benefit. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Paolo Diego Bubbio (2014). Hegel, the Trinity, and the 'I'. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (2):129-150.score: 24.0
    The main goal of this paper is to argue the relevance of Hegel’s notion of the Trinity with respect to two aspects of Hegel’s idealism: the overcoming of subjectivism and his conception of the ‘I’. I contend that these two aspects are interconnected and that the Trinity is important to Hegel’s strategy for addressing these questions. I first address the problem of subjectivism by considering Hegel’s thought against the background of modern philosophy. I argue that the recognitive structure (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael C. Rea (2009). The Trinity. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press. 403--429.score: 24.0
    This paper provides an overview of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, with special attention to the most influential solutions to the so-called "threeness-oneness problem".
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Thomas H. McCall (2010). Which Trinity? Whose Monotheism?: Philosophical and Systematic Theologians on the Metaphysics of Trinitarian Theology. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 24.0
    Which Trinity? : the doctrine of the Trinity -- In contemporary philosophical theology -- Whose monotheism? : Jesus and his Abba -- Doctrine and analysis -- "Whoever raised Jesus from the dead" : Robert Jenson on the identity of the Triune God -- Moltmann's perichoresis : either too much or not enough -- "Eternal functional subordination" : considering a recent evangelical proposal -- Holy love and divine aseity in the theology of John Zizioulas -- Moving forward : theses (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Andrew Robinson (2010). God and the World of Signs: Trinity, Evolution, and the Metaphysical Semiotics of C.S. Peirce. Brill.score: 24.0
    Drawing on the philosophy of C. S. Peirce, Robinson develops a ‘semiotic model’ of the Trinity and proposes a new theology of nature according to which the evolving cosmos may be understood as bearing ‘vestiges of the Trinity in ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2007). Leibniz on the Trinity and the Incarnation: Reason and Revelation in the Seventeenth Century. Yale University Press.score: 24.0
    Throughout his long intellectual life, Leibniz penned his reflections on Christian theology, yet this wealth of material has never been systematically gathered or studied. This book addresses an important and central aspect of these neglected materials—Leibniz’s writings on two mysteries central to Christian thought, the Trinity and the Incarnation. -/- From Antognazza’s study emerges a portrait of a thinker surprisingly receptive to traditional Christian theology and profoundly committed to defending the legitimacy of truths beyond the full grasp of human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Brandon Gallaher (2012). Antinomism, Trinity and the Challenge of Solov'ëvan Pantheism in the Theology of Sergij Bulgakov. Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4):205-225.score: 24.0
    The paper argues that Sergej Bulgakov's sophiology was an attempt, via antinomism or the philosophy of antinomies, to overcome the rationalism, monism, and determinism (in a word, "pantheism") of Vladimir Solov'ëv's philosophy of the Absolute understood as an abstract Trinitarianism. After detailing Solov'ëv's thought on the Trinity and Bulgakov's criticisms of it, the study then describes Bulgakov's antinomism and its application to the doctrine of God. However, it is contended that Bulgakov's antinomism ultimately falls into the same problems with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Shieva Kleinschmidt (2012). Many-One Identity and the Trinity. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 4:84-96.score: 21.0
  13. Scott M. Williams (2012). Henry of Ghent on Real Relations and the Trinity: The Case for Numerical Sameness Without Identity. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 79 (1):109-148.score: 21.0
    I argue that there is a hitherto unrecognized connection between Henry of Ghent’s general theory of real relations and his Trinitarian theology, namely the notion of numerical sameness without identity. A real relation (relatio) is numerically the same thing (res) as its absolute (non-relative) foundation, without being identical to its foundation. This not only holds for creaturely real relations but also for the divine persons’ distinguishing real relations. A divine person who is constituted by a real relation (relatio) and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Dennis Schulting, Review of The Cambridge Companion to the Trinity. [REVIEW]score: 21.0
  15. John Gwyn Griffiths (1996). Triads and Trinity. University of Wales Press.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John J. O'Donnell (1983). Trinity and Temporality: The Christian Doctrine of God in the Light of Process Theology and the Theology of Hope. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gloria L. Schaab (2012). Trinity in Relation: Creation, Incarnation, and Grace in an Evolving Cosmos. Anselm Academic.score: 21.0
    1. To be is to be-in-relation -- 2. Cosmic being as relation -- 3. Human being as relation -- 4. Divine being as relation -- 5. Divine and cosmic being in relation -- 6. Creation as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 7. Incarnation as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 8. Grace as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 9. Living in trinitarian relation.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jeffrey E. Brower & Michael Rea (2005). Material Constitution and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):57-76.score: 18.0
    As is well known, the Christian doctrine of the Trinity poses a serious philosophical problem. On the one hand, it affirms that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—each of whom is God. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. The doctrine therefore pulls us in two directions at once—in the direction of saying that there is exactly one divine being and in the direction of saying that there is more (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jeffrey Brower & Michael Rea, Understanding the Trinity.score: 18.0
    The doctrine of the Trinity poses a deep and difficult problem. On the one hand, it says that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and that each of these Persons “is God”. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. So it appears to involve a contradiction. It seems to say that there is exactly one divine being, and also that there is more than one. How are we to make sense (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2001). Leibniz de Deo Trino: Philosophical Aspects of Leibniz's Conception of the Trinity. Religious Studies 37 (1):1-13.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses Leibniz's Trinitarian doctrine in the light of his philosophy, as revealed by a set of virtually unstudied texts. The first part of the paper examines Leibniz's defence of the Trinity against the charge of contradiction as a necessary precondition to the development of his own conception of the Trinity. The second part discusses some of the key features of Leibniz's Trinitarian doctrine, notably his conception of person, the analogy between the human mind and the (...), and the problem of Trinitarian relations. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jeffrey Brower (2004). Trinity. In The Cambridge Companion to Abelard. Cambridge Univ Pr.score: 18.0
    This article provides a sympathetic treatment of Abelard’s account of the Christian doctrine of the Trinity. It argues that the key to Abelard’s account lies in his ingenious defense of a form of numerical sameness without identity--a relation whose application to the Trinity he justifies on the grounds that it must be invoked to explain familiar cases of material constitution. The conclusion is that, although Abelard’s discussion provides the resources to establish the coherence of the Trinity, his (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2001). The Defence of the Mysteries of the Trinity and the Incarnation: An Example of Leibniz's 'Other' Reason. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):283 – 309.score: 18.0
    In this paper I will discuss certain aspects of Leibniz's theory and practice of 'soft reasoning' as exemplified by his defence of two central mysteries of the Christian revelation: the Trinity and the Incarnation. By theory and practice of 'soft' or 'broad' reasoning, I mean the development of rational strategies which can successefully be applied to the many areas of human understanding which escape strict demonstration, that is, the 'hard' or 'narrow' reasoning typical of mathematical argumentation. These strategies disclose (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jeffrey E. Brower & Michael Rea (2004). Understanding the Trinity. Logos 8:145-157.score: 18.0
    The doctrine of the Trinity poses a deep and difficult problem. On the one hand, it says that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and that each of these Persons “is God”. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. So it appears to involve a contradiction. It seems to say that there is exactly one divine being, and also that there is more than one. How are we to make sense (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Allan Bäck (1998). Scotus on the Consistency of the Incarnation and the Trinity. Vivarium 36 (1):83-107.score: 18.0
    Medieval theologians discussed the logical structure of reduplicative propositions in the midst of their discussions of the Incarnation and the Trinity. Aquinas has the usual medieval analyzes of reduplicative propositions: the specificative and the strictly reduplicative. But neither analysis resolves successfully the problems of the consistency of the statements about God while avoiding making the Trinity or the Incarnation a merely accidental feature of Him. However, Scotus introduces another analysis: abstractive. I shall conclude that Scotus’s view of reduplication, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Linn Tonstad (2009). »The Ultimate Consequence of His Self-Distinction From the Father. . . «: Difference and Hierarchy in Pannenberg's Trinity. [REVIEW] Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 51 (4):383-399.score: 18.0
    Wolfhart Pannenberg's innovative account of the Trinity, in which the mutual self-distinction of the divine persons is also constitutive for the divinity of each, is an important corrective to one-sided views of Trinitarian relations which reductively account only for relations of origin. However, his account ties relationality to death and self-emptying in such a way that it becomes impossible to escape a hierarchical account of Trinitarian relations in which the differences between the persons collapse into an ordered relation that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Zygmunt Bauman (2005). Freedom From, in and Through the State: T.H. Marshall's Trinity of Rights Revisited. Theoria 44 (108):13-27.score: 18.0
    Each one of T.H. Marshall's trinity of human rights rested on the state as, simultaneously, its birth place, executive manager and guardian. And no wonder. At the time Marshall tied personal, political and social freedoms into a historically determined succession of won/bestowed rights, the boundaries of the sovereign state marked the limits of what humans could contemplate, and what they thought they should jointly do, in order to make their world more user-friendly. The state enclosed territory was the site (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Michael Rea (2005). Material Constitution and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):57-76.score: 18.0
    As is well known, the Christian doctrine of the Trinity poses a serious philosophical problem. On the one hand, it affirms that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—each of whom is God. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. The doctrine therefore pulls us in two directions at once—in the direction of saying that there is exactly one divine being and in the direction of saying that there is more (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Michael Rea (2003). Relative Identity and the Doctrine of the Trinity. Philosophia Christi 5 (2):431 - 445.score: 18.0
    The doctrine of the Trinity maintains that there are exactly three divine Persons (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) but only one God. The philosophical problem raised by this doctrine is well known. On the one hand, the doctrine seems clearly to imply that the divine Persons are numerically distinct. How else could they be ’three’ rather than one? On the other hand, it seems to imply that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are identical. If each Person is divine, how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Richard Swinburne (2013). A Posteriori Arguments for the Trinity. Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):13-27.score: 18.0
    There is a good a priori argument for the doctrine of the Trinity, from the need for any divine being to have another divine being to love suffi ciently to provide for him a third divine being whom to love and by whom to be loved. But most people who have believed the doctrine of the Trinity have believed it on the basis of the teaching of Jesus as interpreted by the church. The only reason for believing this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. William Hasker (2010). Constitution and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 27 (3):321-329.score: 18.0
    Jeffrey Brower and Michael Rea have proposed a model for the Trinity using a particular understanding of the relation of material constitution. I examine this model in detail and conclude that it cannot succeed. I then suggest, but do not fully develop, a model of the Trinity using an alternative notion of constitution.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Brian Leftow (2004). A Latin Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):304-333.score: 18.0
    Latin models of the Trinity begin from the existence of one God, and try to explain how one God can be three Persons. I offer an account of this based on an analogy with time-travel. A time-traveler returning to the same point in time repeatedly might have three successive events in his/her life occurring at that one location in public time. So too, God’s life might be such that three distinct parts of His life are always occurring at once, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Paul D. Molnar (2007). Can the Electing God Be God Without Us? Some Implications of Bruce McCormack's Understanding of Barth's Doctrine of Election for the Doctrine of the Trinity. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 49 (2):199-222.score: 18.0
    This article is the attempt at a dialogue with Bruce McCormack about the position he espoused in The Cambridge Companion to Karl Barth concerning the relation between God's Election of grace and God's Triunity. I had criticized McCormack's position in my book, Divine Freedom and the Doctrine of the Immanent Trinity (2002), but I did not elaborate on it in great detail. To develop the dialogue I will: 1) consider McCormack's claim that in CD II/2 Barth made Jesus Christ (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. William Lane Craig (2005). Does the Problem of Material Constitution Illuminate the Doctrine of the Trinity? Faith and Philosophy 22 (1):77-86.score: 18.0
    Michael Rea and Jeffery Brower have offered a provocative new model of the Trinity on the analogy of the Aristotelian solution to the problem of material constitution. Just as a fist and a hand can be distinct entities composed of a common matter and yet numerically the same object, so the persons of the Trinity can be distinct entities (persons) composed of a common "matter" (the divine essence) and yet numerically the same object (God). I express doubts about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael Rea (2005). 10. Understanding the Trinity. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 8 (1).score: 18.0
    The doctrine of the Trinity poses a deep and difficult problem. On the one hand, it says that there are three distinct Persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—and that each of these Persons “is God”. On the other hand, it says that there is one and only one God. So it appears to involve a contradiction. It seems to say that there is exactly one divine being, and also that there is more than one. How are we to make sense (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Edward Wierenga (2004). Trinity and Polytheism. Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):281-294.score: 18.0
    This paper develops an interpretation of the doctrine of the Trinity, drawn from Augustine and the Athanasian Creed. Such a doctrine includes divinity claims (the persons are divine), diversity claims (the persons are distinct), and a uniqueness claim (there is only one God). I propose and defend an interpretation of these theses according to which they are neither logically incompatible nor do they do entail that there are three (or four) gods.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Oleg V. Bychkov (2008). What Does Beauty Have to Do with the Trinity? From Augustine to Duns Scotus. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):197 - 212.score: 18.0
    The issue of why God, the Trinity and Christ in Christianity can be called "beautiful" has been muddled in literature on theological aesthetics. John Duns Scotus’s detailed discussion of relations within the Trinity helps resolve this issue. The Trinity can be called "beautiful" in at least three senses, depending on whether one considers Trinitarian relations at all, whether one looks at the relation of equality, or whether one analyzes relations of origin.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Leon J. Niemoczynski (2012). The One, the Many, and the Trinity: Joseph A. Bracken and the Challenge of Process Metaphysics. [REVIEW] American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 33 (3):277-281.score: 18.0
    Process metaphysics has had a more limited impact in Roman Catholic theology than it has had in Protestant theology. In The One, the Many, and the Trinity, Marc Pugliese traces the development of Roman Catholic theology synthesized with process theology as it is found in the thought of Joseph A. Bracken, S. J. As the title indicates, Bracken’s process perspective concerning the Trinity is the main focus of the book. The One, the Many, and the Trinity consists (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David Paulsen & Brett McDonald (2008). Joseph Smith and the Trinity: An Analysis and Defense of the Social Model of the Godhead. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):47-74.score: 18.0
    The theology of Joseph Smith remains controversial and at times divisive in the broader Christian community. This paper takes Smith’s trinitarian theologyas its point of departure and seeks to accomplish four interrelated goals: (1) to provide a general defense of “social trinitarianism” from some of the major objections raised against it; (2) to express what we take to be Smith’s understanding of the Trinity; (3) to analyze the state of modern ST and (4) to argue that, as a form (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Tom Mccall (2007). Trinity and Creation: Why Kortum's Argument Fails. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):260–266.score: 18.0
    Kortum summarizes his own argument as follows: (1) Without thought, one cannot intentionally create anything. (2) Without language, one cannot have higher-order thoughts. (3) Without others, one cannot have a language. (4) Before the physical universe existed, God was alone and without others. (5) Therefore (by steps 3 and 4), God could not have had a language. Thus (by steps 2, 3 and 4), God could not have had any higher-order thoughts. And so, ultimately (by steps 1, 2, 3, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Christopher B. Gray (1993). Bonaventure's Proof of Trinity. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (2):201-217.score: 18.0
    Bonaventure’s third distinction in the first book of his ’Commentary on the Sentences’ is the focus of argument, after situating the question within contemporary Bonaventure interpretation and current Trinity philosophy. It is argued that Bonaventure had sufficient philosophical grounds to conclude to the existence of Trinity from its image in memory, intelligence and will. Suggestions are made for why he did not do so.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. William Hasker (2009). A Leftovian Trinity? Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):154-166.score: 18.0
    Brian Leftow has proposed a “Latin” doctrine of the Trinity according to which “the Father just is God,” and so also for the Son and the Spirit. I argue that Leftow’s doctrine as he presents it really does have the consequence that Father, Son, and Spirit are all identical, a consequence that is inconsistent with orthodox Trinitarianism. A fairly minor modification would enable Leftow to avoid this untoward consequence. But the doctrine as modified will still retain a strongly modalistic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Scott M. Williams (2012). Indexicals and the Trinity: Two Non-Social Models. Journal of Analytic Theology 1 (1):74-94.score: 18.0
    In recent analytic literature on the Trinity we have seen a variety of "social" models of the Trinity. By contrast there are few "non-­‐social" models. One prominent "non-­‐social" view is Brian Leftow's "Latin Trinity." I argue that the name of Leftow's model is not sufficiently descriptive in light of diverse models within Latin speaking theology. Next, I develop a new "non-­‐social" model that is inspired by Richard of St. Victor's description of a person in conjunction with my (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Brian Leftow (2012). Time Travel and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):313-324.score: 18.0
    I have used a time travel story to model the “Latin” version of the Trinity. William Hasker’s “A Leftovian Trinity?” criticizes my arguments. This piece replies.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Gary Wedeking (1990). Locke on Personal Identity and the Trinity Controversy of the 1690s. Dialogue 29 (02):163-.score: 18.0
    The first part is an account of the Trinity Controversy, centering on the question of the identity of persons, and of the respects in which points made in the controversy, in particular the circularity objection, may have influenced Locke’s formulation of his theory. The second part argues that Locke is attempting to come to grips with the circularity problem, but that his solution is ultimately a failure. The argument of II, xxvii, 13 is analyzed in detail and the form (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Maria Simone Marinho Nogueira (2012). Reflections on the Trinity as Expression of Love in Nicholas of Cusa. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):119-140.score: 18.0
    Procuramos, neste artigo, apresentar a reflexão de Nicolau de Cusa sobre a Trindade, em dois dos seus textos: De coniecturis e De visione dei. Nesses dois livros, a Trindade recebe uma série de outras designações diferentes daquelas que aparecem nas citações bíblicas ou, como ele próprio afirma, diferentes das usadas pelos nossos doutores. Nesse sentido, objetivamos mostrar, também, que as expressões da Trindade podem ser lidas como expressões do amor no pensamento do filósofo alemão. We seek in this paper to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. C. Stephen Layman (1988). Tritheism and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 5 (3):291-298.score: 18.0
    This paper is a reflection on two ontological analogies that have played a role in discussion about the Trinity---the Modalist and Social analogies. I argue that the Modal analogy commits one to a view of the divine persons that comports poorly with Scripture. I then consider two arguments to the effect that the doctrine of the Trinity commits one to tritheism. I argue that the Social analogy contains better resources for handling these arguments than the more traditional position, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Macnamara, Marie Reyes & Gonzalo Reyes (1994). Logic and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):3 - 18.score: 18.0
    The paper gives a model of the sentences that express the core of the doctrine of the Trinity. The new elements in the model are: 1) an underlying map between "Divine Person" and "God"-- in place of set- theoretic inclusion, and 2) the notion of a predicable keeping or not keeping phase in a system of kinds. These elements, which are explained in the text, are common in everyday language. The model requires no tampering with the fundamental laws of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Vinh Bao Luu-Quang (2010). Newman's Theology of the Immanent Trinity in His Parochial and Plain Sermons. Newman Studies Journal 7 (1):73-97.score: 18.0
    This study of two of Newman’s Anglican sermons—“The Christian Mysteries” (1829) and “The Mystery of the Holy Trinity” (1831)—shows that he considered the doctrine of the Trinity to be the foundation of Christian faith. Simultaneously, this study highlights the biblical and patristic underpinnings of Newman’s Trinitarian theology, while showing that he was defending Trinitarian orthodoxy from both “classical heresies” and contemporary Liberalism and Rationalism.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Matthew Zaro Fisher (2014). A Supervenient Trinity: An Alternative to Latin and Social Trinitarian Theories. Heythrop Journal 55 (3).score: 18.0
    The Latin Trinity (LT) and the Social Trinity (ST) represent the two dominant approaches for interpreting the doctrine of the Trinity in contemporary philosophical theology. Both approaches have consequences for Christian theology, however, and I believe that neither sufficiently overcomes the charges of modalism or tritheism, respectively. Moreover, the charge of the overall logical incoherency of the doctrine of the Trinity remains a viable criticism. In order to defend the doctrine of the Trinity against charges (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Brett McDonald (2008). Joseph Smith and the Trinity. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):47-74.score: 18.0
    The theology of Joseph Smith remains controversial and at times divisive in the broader Christian community. This paper takes Smith’s trinitarian theologyas its point of departure and seeks to accomplish four interrelated goals: (1) to provide a general defense of “social trinitarianism” from some of the major objections raised against it; (2) to express what we take to be Smith’s understanding of the Trinity; (3) to analyze the state of modern ST and (4) to argue that, as a form (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 692