Search results for 'Trogdon Kelly' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Kelly Trogdon (2010). Intrinsicality for Monists (and Pluralists). Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):555-558.score: 360.0
    Two competing views in sparse ontology are monism and pluralism. In Trogdon 2009 I propose an account of intrinsicality that I argue is both compatible with monism and pluralism and independently plausible. Skiles 2009 argues that my account fails on both fronts. In this note I respond to his two objections.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kelly Trogdon (2013). An Introduction to Grounding. In Miguel Hoeltje, Benjamin Schnieder & Alex Steinberg (eds.), Varieties of Dependence: Ontological Dependence, Grounding, Supervenience, Response-Dependence (Basic Philosophical Concepts). Philosophia Verlag. 97-122.score: 300.0
    The primary goal of this chapter is to set out and clarify some of the central issues and disputes concerning grounding (alternatively, the in virtue of relation, priority, metaphysical explanation, and so on). I begin by introducing a taxonomy of positions that proceeds upon a cluster of related issues including, for example, whether our talk of grounding in philosophical discourse is univocal. Then I consider the logical form of grounding statements as well as the structural principles that govern grounding. Next, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kelly Trogdon (2013). Grounding: Necessary or Contingent? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (4):465-485.score: 300.0
    Recent interest in the nature of grounding is due in part to the idea that purely modal notions are too coarse-grained to capture what we have in mind when we say that one thing is grounded in another. Grounding not being purely modal in character, however, is compatible with it having modal consequences. Is grounding a necessary relation? In this article I argue that the answer is �yes� in the sense that propositions corresponding to full grounds modally entail propositions corresponding (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kelly Trogdon (2009). Monism and Intrinsicality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):127 – 148.score: 300.0
    Central to the programme of sparse ontology is a hierarchical view of reality; the basic entities form the sparse structure of being, while the derivative entities form the abundant superstructure. Priority pluralism and priority monism are both theses of sparse ontology. Roughly speaking, the priority pluralist claims that wholes and their properties ontologically depend on parts and their properties, while the priority monist claims that it goes the other way around. In this paper I focus on Ted Sider's recent argument (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joseph Levine & Kelly Trogdon (2009). The Modal Status of Materialism. Philosophical Studies 145 (3):351 - 362.score: 300.0
    Materialism, as traditionally conceived, has a contingent side and a necessary side. The necessity of materialism is reflected by the metaphysics of realization, while its contingency is a matter of accepting the possibility of Cartesian worlds, worlds in which our minds are roughly as Descartes describes them. In this paper we argue that the necessity and the contingency of materialism are in conflict. In particular, we claim that if mental properties are realized by physical properties in the actual world, Cartesian (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. D. Gene Witmer, William Butchard & Kelly Trogdon (2005). Intrinsicality Without Naturalness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):326–350.score: 300.0
    Rae Langton and David Lewis have proposed an account of "intrinsic property" that makes use of two notions: being independent of accompaniment and being natural. We find the appeal to the first of these promising; the second notion, however, we find mystifying. In this paper we argue that the appeal to naturalness is not acceptable and offer an alternative definition of intrinsicality. The alternative definition makes crucial use of a notion commonly used by philosophers, namely, the notion of one property (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kelly Trogdon (2009). Physicalsim and Sparse Ontology. Philosophical Studies 143 (2):147-165.score: 300.0
    A major stumbling block for non-reductive physicalism is Kim’s disjunctive property objection. In this paper I bring certain issues in sparse ontology to bear on the objection, in particular the theses of priority monism and priority pluralism. Priority pluralism (or something close to it, anyway) is a common ontological background assumption, so in the first part of the paper I consider whether the disjunctive property objection applies with equal force to non-reductive physicalism on the assumption that priority monism is instead (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kelly Trogdon (2011). Geraldine Coggins, Could There Have Been Nothing? Against Metaphysical Nihilism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophy Reviews.score: 300.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kelly Trogdon (2009). Daniel Stoljar, Ignorance and Imagination: The Epistemic Origin of the Problem of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (2):269-273.score: 300.0
    Stoljar’s book has three parts. In the first part, he discusses the “problem of experience”: though we have experiences, it isn’t clear that the experiential fits into the actual world, given that the actual world is fundamentally non-experiential. Stoljar focuses on what he views as one facet of the problem of experience, the “logical problem”, which consists of three jointly inconsistent claims: (T1) there are experiential truths; (T2) if there are experiential truths, every experiential truth is entailed by some non-experiential (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kelly Trogdon (2009). Phenomenal Acquaintance. Dissertation, UMass Amherstscore: 300.0
    Chapter 1 of Phenomenal Acquaintance is devoted to taking care of some preliminary issues. I begin by distinguishing those states of awareness in virtue of which we’re acquainted with the phenomenal characters of our experiences from those states of awareness some claim are at the very nature of experience. Then I reconcile the idea that experience is transparent with the claim that we can be acquainted with phenomenal character. In Chapter 2 I set up a dilemma that is the primary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kelly Trogdon (forthcoming). Placement, Grounding, and Mental Content. In Chris Daly (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Philosophical Methods. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 300.0
    One central issue concerning philosophical methodology is this: what concepts should go into our philosophical toolbox? That is to say, what notions are appropriate to rely on in doing philosophy? This issue is relevant not only to how we should go about addressing philosophical problems but also how we’re to formulate those problems in the first place. There is a burgeoning literature on the notion of grounding. I’m a proponent of grounding – I think the notion of grounding is coherent (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kelly Trogdon & Paisley Livingston (2014). The Complete Work. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):225-233.score: 300.0
    What is it for a work of art to be complete? In this article, we argue that an artwork is complete just in case the artist has acquired a completion disposition with respect to her work—a disposition grounded in certain cognitive mechanisms to refrain from making significant changes to the work. We begin by explaining why the complete/incomplete distinction with respect to artworks is both practically and philosophically significant. Then we consider and reject two approaches to artwork completion. Finally, we (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kelly Trogdon, Comments on Robert Schroer's “Where's the Beef? How the Content of Phenomenal Concepts Can Be Substantial Even If They Contain Demonstrative Elements”.score: 300.0
    The Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology, New Orleans, LA (March 2008).
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Kevin Kelly, Kevin Kelly, Oliver Schulte, Vincent Hendricks.score: 180.0
    Philosophical logicians proposing theories of rational belief revision have had little to say about whether their proposals assist or impede the agent's ability to reliably arrive at the truth as his beliefs change through time. On the other hand, reliability is the central concern of formal learning theory. In this paper we investigate the belief revision theory of Alchourron, Gardenfors and Makinson from a learning theoretic point of view.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. George Armstrong Kelly (1979). A Reply From George Armstrong Kelly. The Owl of Minerva 10 (4):10-11.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Michael Kelly, Edgar Morin: Introduction (Special Issue Edited by Michael Kelly).score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kevin Kelly, Kevin T. Kelly and Oliver Schulte.score: 180.0
    We argue that uncomputability and classical scepticism are both re ections of inductive underdetermination, so that Church's thesis and Hume's problem ought to receive equal emphasis in a balanced approach to the philosophy of induction. As an illustration of such an approach, we investigate how uncomputable the predictions of a hypothesis can be if the hypothesis is to be reliably investigated by a computable scienti c method.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Mary Kelly (2007). 17 Mary Kelly. In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg. 17.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Kevin T. Kelly, Julie Clague, Bernard Hoose & Gerard Mannion (eds.) (2008). Moral Theology for the Twenty-First Century: Essays in Celebration of Kevin Kelly. T & T Clark.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Relevance of Phenomenology to the Philosophy of Language and Mind. New York: Garland Publishing.score: 60.0
    Through discussion of phenomenological and analytic traditions such as the philosophical problems of perceptual content, the content of demonstrative thoughts and the unity of proposition, Kelly explains that these concepts are not as alien to one another as most people believe.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael Kelly (2003). Iconoclasm in Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Although philosophers have characteristically taken the view that art is a vehicle of some universal meaning or truth, art historians emphasize the concrete, historical location of the individual work of art. Is aesthetics capable of sustaining these two approaches? Or, as Michael Kelly argues: Is art actually determined by its historical particularity? His book covers the views of four philosophers--Heidegger, Adorno, Derrida, and Danto--ultimately iconoclasts, despite their significant philosophical engagement with the arts.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Kevin T. Kelly & Clark Glymour, Why Bayesian Confirmation Does Not Capture the Logic of Scientific Justification.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly and Clark Glymour. Why Bayesian Confirmation Does Not Capture the Logic of Scientific Justification.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Michael Kelly, Post-Structuralism.score: 60.0
    Michael Kelly is the author of 68 entries altogether. The New Oxford Companion to Literature in French is far more than a simple revision of the original Oxford Companion to French Literature , published in 1959, and described by The Listener as the `standard work of reference for English-speaking enquirers into French literature'. As the change in title implies, this completely new work presents an authoritative guide not only to ten centuries of literature produced in the territory now called (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Kevin T. Kelly & Clark Glymour (1992). Inductive Inference From Theory Laden Data. Journal of Philosophical Logic 21 (4):391 - 444.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly and Clark Glymour. Inductive Inference from Theory-Laden Data.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Conor Mayo-Wilson & Kevin Kelly, Ockham Efficiency Theorem for Stochastic Empirical Methods.score: 60.0
    Ockham’s razor is the principle that, all other things being equal, scientists ought to prefer simpler theories. In recent years, philosophers have argued that simpler theories make better predictions, possess theoretical virtues like explanatory power, and have other pragmatic virtues like computational tractability. However, such arguments fail to explain how and why a preference for simplicity can help one find true theories in scientific inquiry, unless one already assumes that the truth is simple. One new solution to that problem is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jamie Terence Kelly (2012). Framing Democracy: A Behavioral Approach to Democratic Theory. Princeton University Press.score: 60.0
    The past thirty years have seen a surge of empirical research into political decision making and the influence of framing effects--the phenomenon that occurs when different but equivalent presentations of a decision problem elicit different judgments or preferences. During the same period, political philosophers have become increasingly interested in democratic theory, particularly in deliberative theories of democracy. Unfortunately, the empirical and philosophical studies of democracy have largely proceeded in isolation from each other. As a result, philosophical treatments of democracy have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kevin T. Kelly, Cory Juhl & Clark Glymour, Reliability, Realism, and Relativism.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly, Cory Juhl and Clark Glymour. Reliability, Realism, and Relativism.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Fitz-Herbert & Gerard Kelly (2011). Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts September - November. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (3):358.score: 60.0
    Fitz-Herbert, John; Kelly, Gerard The 'pastoral care of the sick' is one of the important responses to the gospel that occurs in almost every parish. Faithful Sunday parishioners visit other parishioners week-in and week-out. They put into deed the concern of the believing community for the one who is unable to gather with the Sunday community for eucharist. They bring holy communion as well as friendship and their pastoral concern to the person being visited. Sometimes it happens that this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Clark Glymour & Kevin T. Kelly, Thoroughly Modern Meno.score: 60.0
    Clark Glymour and Kevin T. Kelly. Thoroughly Modern Meno.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Gerard Kelly (2014). The Impact of the Second Vatican Council. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):146.score: 60.0
    Kelly, Gerard There can be no doubting that the Second Vatican Council has had a remarkable impact on the Catholic Church and its people in Australia. Many would argue that the council's influence extends far beyond the Catholic Church and touches other churches.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes & Kevin T. Kelly, Discovering Causal Structure: Artifical Intelligence, Philosophy of Science and Statistical Modeling.score: 60.0
    Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Peter Spirtes and Kevin Kelly. Discovering Causal Structure: Artifical Intelligence, Philosophy of Science and Statistical Modeling.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael Kelly, Philosophies of Marxism: Gramsci, Lukacs, Benjamin, Althusser.score: 60.0
    Table of contents : 1. The beginnings of phenomenology: Husserl and his predecessors Richard Cobb-Stevens, Boston College 2. Philosophy of existence 1: Heidegger Jacques Taminiaux, University of Louvain, Belgium 3. Philosophy of existence 2: Sartre Thomas Flynn, Emory University 4. Philosophy of existence 3: Merleau-Ponty Bernard Cullen, Queen's University, Belfast 5. Philosophies of religion: Jaspers, Marcel, Levinas William Desmond, Loyola College 6. Philosophies of science: Mach, Duhem, Bachelard Babette Babich, Fordham University 7. Philosophies of Marxism: Gramsci, Lukacs, Benjamin, Althusser Michael (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Kevin T. Kelly, General Characteristics of Inductive Inference Over Arbitrary Sets of Data Representations.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly. General Characteristics of Inductive Inference Over Arbitrary Sets of Data Representations.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael Kelly, Humanism and National Unity: The Ideological Reconstruction of France.score: 60.0
    Contents: The Communist Party and the politics of cultural change in postwar Italy, 1945-50 / Stephen Gundle -- Writing and the real world : Italian narrative in the period of reconstruction / Michael Caesar -- The making and unmaking of Neorealism in postwar Italy / David Forgacs -- The place of Neorealism in Italian cinema from 1945 to 1954 / Christopher Wagstaff -- Tradition and social change in the French and Italian cinemas of the reconstruction / Pierre Sorlin -- Humanism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. P. J. Kelly (1990). Utilitarianism and Distributive Justice: Jeremy Bentham and the Civil Law. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Drawing extensively on Bentham's unpublished civil and distributive law writings, classical and recent Bentham scholarship, and contemporary work in moral and political philosophy, Kelly here presents the first full-length exposition and sympathetic defense of Bentham's unique utilitarian theory of justice. Kelly shows how Bentham developed a moderate welfare-state liberal theory of justice with egalitarian leanings, the aim of which was to secure the material and political conditions of each citizen's pursuit of the good life in cooperation with each (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Kevin T. Kelly, Version Spaces, Structural Descriptions and NP-Completeness.score: 60.0
    Kevin T. Kelly. Version Spaces, Structural Descriptions and NP-Completeness.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Gerard Kelly (2011). Sunday Matters: Reflections on the Lectionary Readings for Year A [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (2):249.score: 60.0
    Kelly, Gerard Review(s) of: Sunday Matters: Reflections on the Lectionary Readings for Year A, by Mark O'Brien OP (Hindmarsh SA: ATF Press, 2010), pp.201, $34.95.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alexander Skiles (2009). Trogdon on Monism and Intrinsicality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):149 – 154.score: 54.0
    Kelly Trogdon [2009] argues that priority monism—here, the view that only the world as a whole has fundamental properties—conflicts with the best extant accounts of intrinsicality. He then proposes an alternative account that is designed to be not only compatible with this view, but also independently plausible. But his account conflicts with priority monism as well, and incorrectly classifies various non-intrinsic properties.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas Kelly (2010). Peer Disagreement and Higher Order Evidence. In Alvin I. Goldman & Dennis Whitcomb (eds.), Social Epistemology: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press. 183--217.score: 30.0
    My aim in this paper is to develop and defend a novel answer to a question that has recently generated a considerable amount of controversy. The question concerns the normative significance of peer disagreement. Suppose that you and I have been exposed to the same evidence and arguments that bear on some proposition: there is no relevant consideration which is available to you but not to me, or vice versa. For the sake of concreteness, we might picture.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas Kelly (2005). The Epistemic Significance of Disagreement. In John Hawthorne & Tamar Gendler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology, Volume 1. Oup. 167-196.score: 30.0
    Looking back on it, it seems almost incredible that so many equally educated, equally sincere compatriots and contemporaries, all drawing from the same limited stock of evidence, should have reached so many totally different conclusions---and always with complete certainty.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Sean Dorrance Kelly (2002). Merleau–Ponty on the Body. Ratio 15 (4):376–391.score: 30.0
    The French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty claims that there are two distinct ways in which we can understand the place of an object when we are visually apprehending it. The first involves an intentional relation to the object that is essentially cognitive or can serve as the input to cognitive processes; the second irreducibly involves a bodily set or preparation to deal with the object. Because of its essential bodily component, Merleau-Ponty calls this second kind of understanding ‘motor intentional’. In this (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Erin I. Kelly (2009). Criminal Justice Without Retribution. Journal of Philosophy 106 (8):440-462.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Thomas Kelly (2008). Disagreement, Dogmatism, and Belief Polarization. Journal of Philosophy 105 (10):611-633.score: 30.0
    Suppose that you and I disagree about some non-straightforward matter of fact (say, about whether capital punishment tends to have a deterrent effect on crime). Psychologists have demonstrated the following striking phenomenon: if you and I are subsequently exposed to a mixed body of evidence that bears on the question, doing so tends to increase the extent of our initial disagreement. That is, in response to exactly the same evidence, each of us grows increasingly confident of his or her original (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Thomas Kelly (2003). Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):612–640.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I explore the relationship between epistemic rationality and instrumental rationality, and I attempt to delineate their respective roles in typical instances of theoretical reasoning. My primary concern is with the instrumentalist conception of epistemic rationality: the view that epistemic rationality is simply a species of instrumental rationality, viz. instrumental rationality in the service of one's cognitive or epistemic goals. After sketching the relevance of the instrumentalist conception to debates over naturalism and 'the ethics of belief', I argue (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Sean Dorrance Kelly (2008). Content and Constancy: Phenomenology, Psychology, and the Content of Perception. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):682–690.score: 30.0
  46. Thomas Kelly & Sarah McGrath (2010). Is Reflective Equilibrium Enough? Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):325-359.score: 30.0
    Suppose that one is at least a minimal realist about a given domain, in that one thinks that that domain contains truths that are not in any interesting sense of our own making. Given such an understanding, what can be said for and against the method of reflective equilibrium as a procedure for investigating the domain? One fact that lends this question some interest is that many philosophers do combine commitments to minimal realism and a reflective equilibrium methodology. Here, for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Sean D. Kelly (2005). The Puzzle of Temporal Experience. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 208--238.score: 30.0
    There you are at the opera house. The soprano has just hit her high note – a glassshattering high C that fills the hall – and she holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds it. She holds the note for such a long time that after a while a funny thing happens: you no longer seem only to hear it, the note as it is currently sounding, that glass-shattering high C that is loud and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Sean D. Kelly (2005). Seeing Things in Merleau-Ponty. In C. Tarman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty. Cambridge. 74-110.score: 30.0
    The passage above comes from the opening pages of Merleau-Ponty’s essay on Edmund Husserl. It proposes a risky interpretive principle. The main feature of this principle is that the seminal aspects of a thinker’s work are so close to him that he is incapable of articulating them himself. Nevertheless, these aspects pervade the work, give it its style, its sense and its direction, and therefore belong to it essentially. As Martin Heidegger writes, in a passage quoted by Merleau-Ponty:
    The (...)
    The goal of Merleau-Ponty’s essay, he says, is “to evoke this un-thought-of element in Husserl’s thought”.3. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sean D. Kelly (2001). The Non-Conceptual Content of Perceptual Experience: Situation Dependence and Fineness of Grain. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):601-608.score: 30.0
    I begin by examining a recent debate between John McDowell and Christopher Peacocke over whether the content of perceptual experience is non-conceptual. Although I am sympathetic to Peacocke’s claim that perceptual content is non-conceptual, I suggest a number of ways in which his arguments fail to make that case. This failure stems from an over-emphasis on the "fine-grainedness" of perceptual content - a feature that is relatively unimportant to its non-conceptual structure. I go on to describe two other features of (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Daniel Kelly, The Ethics of Disgust.score: 30.0
    I argue that the recent debate about the role disgust deserves in ethical thought has been impoverished by an inadequate understanding of the emotion itself. After considering Kass and Nussbaum’s respective positions in that debate, and the implausible views of the nature of disgust on which their arguments rest, I describe my own view, which makes sense of the wealth of recent, often puzzling, empirical work done on the emotion. This view sees disgust as being primarily responsible for protecting against (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999