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  1. Osagie K. Obasogie & Troy Duster (2011). All That Glitters Isn't Gold. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):15-18.
    The increasing use of DNA evidence has revolutionized criminal investigations. Over the past several years, DNA forensics—once thought to be a less reliable identifier than other forensic techniques, such as latent fingerprinting—have now become the evidentiary gold standard in criminal prosecutions. At the same time, non-DNA-based forensic techniques that have incarcerated thousands are coming under fire. The policy implications of this shifting dynamic—what Michael Lynch and colleagues call an “inversion of credibility”1—can be most clearly seen in the National Research Council’s (...)
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  2. Troy Duster (2006). Explaining Differential Trust of DNA Forensic Technology: Grounded Assessment or Inexplicable Paranoia? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (2):293-300.
    In the spring of 2005, the Portuguese government passed legislation paving the way for all residents to contribute their DNA to a national database to be used for medical and forensic purposes. There was no significant opposition. In sharp contrast, the United States will experience a contentious debate with strong opposition from many groups if and when such a law is proposed. Some of the reasons have to do with a history of sharply different experiences with, and trust of, the (...)
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  3. Troy Duster (2006). Lessons From History: Why Race and Ethnicity Have Played a Major Role in Biomedical Research. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (3):487-496.
    Before any citizen enters the role of scientist, medical practitioner, lawyer, epidemiologist, and so on, each and all grow up in a society in which the categories of human differentiation are folk categories that organize perceptions, relations, and behavior. That was true during slavery, during Reconstruction, the eugenics period, the two World Wars, and is no less true today. While every period understandably claims to transcend those categories, medicine, law, and science are profoundly and demonstrably influenced by the embedded folk (...)
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  4. Troy Duster (2002). Medicine, Culture, and Sickle Cell Disease. Hastings Center Report 32 (4):46-47.
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  5. Troy Duster (1996). The Prism of Heritability and the Sociology of Knowledge. In Laura Nader (ed.), Naked Science: Anthropological Inquiry Into Boundaries, Power, and Knowledge. Routledge. 119--30.