Search results for 'Truth Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet (...)
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  2. Raghunath Ghosh & Jyotish Chandra Basak (eds.) (2009). Language and Truth in Buddhism. Northern Book Centre.score: 180.0
     
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  3. Kamala Kumari (1987). Notion of Truth in Buddhism and Pragmatism. Capital Pub. House.score: 180.0
     
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  4. Sulak Sivaraksa (2001). The Sound of Liberating Truth: Buddhist-Christian Dialogues in Honor of Frederick J. Streng (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):129-130.score: 156.0
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  5. The Cowherds (2011). Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. OUP USA.score: 144.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd C CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet (...)
     
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  6. T. J. F. Tillemans (2011). How Far Can a Mādhyamika Buddhist Reform Conventional Truth? Dismal Relativism, Fictionalism, Easy-Easy Truth, and the Alternatives. In Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.), Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 151--165.score: 144.0
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  7. André van Der Braak (2010). Nietzsche and Japanese Buddhism on the Cultivation of the Body: To What Extent Does Truth Bear Incorporation? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):223-251.score: 132.0
    In order to overcome the unhealthy perspective of body-mind dualism and become capable of holding the “higher” and healthier perspective of body and mind as will to power, Nietzsche stresses that one must engage in a process of cultivation of the body. Such a practice of self-cultivation involves leaving behind incorporated illusory and life-denying perspectives and incorporating more “truthful” and affirmative perspectives on life. In this article, Nietzsche’s views on the body and its cultivation will be further explored and compared (...)
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  8. Tom Lowenstein (2011). Buddhist Inspirations: Essential Philosophy, Truth and Enlightenment. Watkins Publishing.score: 132.0
    Life and insights -- Wisdom's echoes -- Healing practices -- Sacred symbolism -- Spiritual cosmos.
     
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  9. Noritoshi Aramaki (2007). A Critique of Whitehead in Light of the Buddhist Distinction of theTwo-Truth Doctrine. Process Studies 36 (2):294-305.score: 126.0
    We need to distinguish systematically what is culturally creative from the degenerative forces that now rule the world. Whitehead comes closest to defining the creative when he identifies it as freedom on the human side and peace on the divine. Buddhist meditation can go deeper to realize the zero-dimension of the communal life-as-such, which corresponds to Whiteheadean freedom-and-peace as the ultimate wellspring of cultural creativity.
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  10. Francisco J. Varela & Bernhard Poerksen (2006). Truth is What Works : Francisco J. Varela on Cognitive Science, Buddhism, the Inseparability of Subject and Object, and the Exaggerations of Constructivism--A Conversation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (1):35-53.score: 120.0
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  11. Mark Siderits (1979). A Note on the Early Buddhist Theory of Truth. Philosophy East and West 29 (4):491-499.score: 120.0
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  12. Dale Wright (1986). Language and Truth in Hua-Yen Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (1):21-47.score: 120.0
  13. Jeremy E. Henkel (2012). Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (3):428-429.score: 120.0
  14. Jonathan C. Gold (2013). Review of The Cowherds, Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. [REVIEW] Sophia 52 (2):397-399.score: 120.0
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  15. Hsueh-Li Cheng (1981). Truth and Logic in San-Lun Mādhyamika Buddhism. International Philosophical Quarterly 21 (3):260-275.score: 120.0
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  16. John J. Holder (1996). The Early Buddhist Theory of Truth. International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):443-459.score: 120.0
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  17. R. Keller Kimbrough (forthcoming). Reading the Miraculous Powers of Japanese Poetry: Spells, Truth Acts, and a Medieval Buddhist Poetics of the Supernatural. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.score: 120.0
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  18. Gail Chin (forthcoming). The Gender of Buddhist Truth: The Female Corpse in a Group of Japanese Paintings. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.score: 120.0
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  19. Roger J. Corless (1987). Can Buddhism Validate the Truth of God Incarnate? Modern Theology 3 (4):333-343.score: 120.0
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  20. Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.) (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
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  21. Chin Gail (1998). The Gender of Buddhist Truth. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 25:3-4.score: 120.0
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  22. Guy Newland (1992). The Two Truths in the Mādhyamika Philosophy of the Ge-Luk-Ba Order of Tibetan Buddhism. Snow Lion Publications.score: 120.0
     
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  23. Jan Westerhoff (2011). The Merely Conventional Existence of the World. In Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.), Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    A platitude questioned by many Buddhist thinkers in India and Tibet is the existence of the world. We might be tempted to insert some modifier here, such as “substantial,” “self-existent,” or “intrinsically existent,” for, one might argue, these thinkers did not want to question the existence of the world tout court but only that of a substantial, self-existent, or otherwise suitably qualified world. But perhaps these modifiers are not as important as is generally thought, for the understanding of the world (...)
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  24. Ramsukhdas (2009). Discovery of Truth and Immortality. Gita Press.score: 90.0
     
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  25. Vincent Eltschinger (2014). The Four Nobles' Truths and Their 16 Aspects: On the Dogmatic and Soteriological Presuppositions of the Buddhist Epistemologists' Views on Niścaya. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (2-3):249-273.score: 68.0
    Most Buddhists would admit that every Buddhist practice and theoretical construct can be traced to or at least subsumed under one or more among the four nobles’ truths. It is hardly surprising, then, that listening to these truths and pondering upon them were considered the cornerstones of the Buddhist soteric endeavour. Learning them from a competent teacher and subjecting them to rational analysis are generally regarded as taking place at the very beginning of the religious career or, to put it (...)
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  26. Mark Siderits (2008). Paleo-Compatibilism and Buddhist Reductionism. Sophia 47 (1):29-42.score: 66.0
    Paleo-compatibilism is the view that the freedom required for moral responsibility is not incompatible with determinism about the factors relevant to moral assessment, since the claim that we are free and the claim that the psychophysical elements are causally determined are true in distinct and incommensurable ways. This is to be accounted for by appealing to the distinction between conventional truth and ultimate truth developed by Buddhist Reductionists. Paleo-compatibilists hold that the illusion of incompatibilism only arises when we (...)
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  27. Douglas Duckworth (2014). How Nonsectarian is 'Nonsectarian'?: Jorge Ferrer's Pluralist Alternative to Tibetan Buddhist Inclusivism. Sophia 53 (3):339-348.score: 66.0
    This paper queries the logic of the structure of hierarchical philosophical systems. Following the Indian tradition of siddhānta, Tibetan Buddhist traditions articulate a hierarchy of philosophical views. The ‘Middle Way’ philosophy or Madhyamaka—the view that holds that the ultimate truth is emptiness—is, in general, held to be the highest view in the systematic depictions of philosophies in Tibet, and is contrasted with realist schools of thought, Buddhist and non-Buddhist. But why should an antirealist or nominalist position be said to (...)
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  28. Dzogchen Ponlop (2011). Rebel Buddha: A Guide to a Revolution of Mind. Shambhala.score: 60.0
    Paperback reissue of Rebel Buddha: on the road to freedom.
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  29. Alfredo Aveline (2002). La visión budista de la cuestión cognitiva. Polis 3.score: 60.0
    El objetivo del presente texto es llegar a una descripción clara y comprensiva de la forma budista de abordar la cuestión cognitiva. La palabra cognición se refiere aquí al proceso por el cual se desenvuelve la convicción de que algo es "verdadero". El examen budista de la cognición puede, a su vez, ser encarado como una forma de buscar mayor libertad y distanciamiento frente a los pensamientos, opiniones y tendencias propios.
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  30. Hisayasu Kobayashi (2011). Prajñākaragupta on the Two Truths and Argumentation. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):427-439.score: 58.0
    How is it possible to say that truth can be of one kind at the conventional level and totally different in the ultimate plane? As Matilal ( 1971 , p. 154) points out, Kumārila (ca. 600–650), a Mīmāṃsaka philosopher, claims that the Buddhist doctrine of two truths is “a kind of philosophical ‘double-talk’.” It is Prajñākaragupta (ca. 750–810), a Buddhist logician, who tries to give a direct answer to this question posed by Kumārila from the Buddhist side. He argues (...)
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  31. Florin Deleanu (2010). Agnostic Meditations on Buddhist Meditation. Zygon 45 (3):605-626.score: 54.0
    I first attempt a taxonomy of meditation in traditional Indian Buddhism. Based on the main psychological or somatic function at which the meditative effort is directed, the following classes can be distinguished: (1) emotion-centered meditation (coinciding with the traditional samatha approach); (2) consciousness-centered meditation (with two subclasses: consciousness reduction/elimination and ideation obliteration); (3) reflection-centered meditation (with two subtypes: morality-directed reflection and reality-directed observation, the latter corresponding to the vipassanā method); (4) visualization-centered meditation; and (5) physiology-centered meditation. In the second (...)
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  32. Jay Garfield, Reductionism and Fictionalism Comments on Siderits' Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy.score: 54.0
    As a critic, I am in the unenviable position of agreeing with nearly all of what Mark does in this lucid, erudite and creative book. My comments will hence not be aimed at showing what he got wrong, as much as an attempt from a Madhyamaka point of view to suggest another way of seeing things, in particular another way of seeing how one might think of how Madhyamaka philosophers, such as Någårjuna and Candrak¥rti, see conventional truth, our engagement (...)
     
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  33. Hans-Rudolf Kantor (2011). 'Right Words Are Like the Reverse'—The Daoist Rhetoric and the Linguistic Strategy in Early Chinese Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 20 (3):283-307.score: 54.0
    ?Right words are like the reverse? is the concluding remark of chap. 78 in the Daoist classic Daodejing. Quoted in treatises composed by Seng Zhao (374?414), it designates the linguistic strategy used to unfold the Buddhist Madhyamaka meaning of ?emptiness? and ?ultimate truth?. In his treatise Things Do not Move, Seng Zhao demonstrates that ?motion and stillness? are not really contradictory, performing the deconstructive meaning of Buddhist ?emptiness? via the corresponding linguistic strategy. Though the topic of the discussion and (...)
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  34. John Schroeder (2011). Truth, Deception, and Skillful Means in the Lotus Sūtra. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):35-52.score: 54.0
    This article seeks to broaden contemporary scholarship on the Lotus S?tra by arguing that it is a philosophically critical, self-reflective text struggling with problems of truth in Buddhist discourse. While all Lotus S?tra scholars agree that the doctrine of skillful means is a central teaching in the text, there is a common tendency to frame skillful means as a passive vehicle (or ?means?) for expressing truth rather than an active philosophical critique of truth. This article argues that (...)
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  35. Tao Jin (2013). What It Means to Interpret: A Standard Formulation and its Implicit Corollaries in Chinese Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 63 (2):153-175.score: 54.0
    In the study of the Buddhist practice of scriptural interpretation, an inevitable subject of inquiry, apart from the content of interpretation, is the act of interpretation itself. Such an inquiry may naturally go in two different directions, looking at either the theories of interpretation or the theories about interpretation. The theories of interpretation guide the understanding and retrieval of meaning, and the theories about interpretation explore instead the nature or, more specifically, the role of interpretation in the transmission of (...). In other words, of these two directions the former asks how one interprets and the latter what it means to interpret.In Western studies of Buddhism over the past few .. (shrink)
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  36. Charles Hallisey & Anne Hansen (1996). Narrative, Sub-Ethics, and the Moral Life: Some Evidence From Theravāda Buddhism. Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):305 - 327.score: 54.0
    The intent of this article is to explore the extent to which we can apply to Buddhist ethics Martha Nussbaum's statement that "[l]iterary form is not separable from philosophical content, but is itself, a part of content - an integral part, then, of the search for and the statement of truth" (Nussbaum 1990, 3). We explore the transformative impact that narratives can have on moral life, using examples from the story literature of Theravāda Buddhist traditions in Sri Lanka and (...)
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  37. David Loy (1996). Beyond Good and Evil? A Buddhist Critique of Nietzsche. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):37 – 57.score: 54.0
    Abstract In what ways was Nietzsche right, from a Buddhist perspective, and where did he go wrong? Nietzsche understood how the distinction we make between this world and a higher spiritual realm serves our need for security, and he saw the bad faith in religious values motivated by this need. He did not perceive how his alternative, more aristocratic values, also reflects the same anxiety. Nietzsche realised how the search for truth is motivated by a sublimated desire for symbolic (...)
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  38. R. K. Payne (1987). The Theory of Meaning in Buddhist Logicians: The Historical and Intellectual Context of Apoha. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (3):261-284.score: 54.0
    These supporting concepts enable us to much more adequately understand the meaning of apoha. First, a sharp distinction is drawn between the real and the conceptual; the real is particular, unique, momentary and the basis of perception, while the conceptual is universal, general, only supposedly objective and the basis of language. Second, the complex nature of negation discloses the kind of negation meant by apoha. Negation by implication is seen as disclosing the necessary relation between simple affirmations and simple negations. (...)
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  39. Richard P. Hayes (1988). Principled Atheism in the Buddhist Scholastic Tradition. Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (1):5-28.score: 54.0
    The doctrine that there is no permanent creator who superintends creation and takes care of his creatures accords quite well with each of the principles known as the four noble truths of Buddhism. The first truth, that distress is universal, is traditionally expounded in terms of the impermanence of all features of experience and in terms of the absence of genuine unity or personal identity in the multitude of physical and mental factors that constitute what we experience as (...)
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  40. David Scott (1995). Buddhist Functionalism—Instrumentality Reaffirmed. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):127 – 149.score: 54.0
    Abstract This article seeks to determine if Buddhism can best be understood as primarily a functionalist tradition. In pursuing this, some analogies arise with various Western strands?particularly James? ?pragmatism?, Dewey's ?instrumentalism?, Braithwaite's ?empiricism?, Wittgenstein's ?language games?, and process thinkers like Hartshorne and Jacobson. Within the Buddhist setting, the traditional Therav?da framework of sila (ethics/precepts), sam?dhi (meditation) and pañña (wisdom) are examined, together with Therav?da rituals. Despite some ?correspondence? approaches with regard to truth claim statements, e.g. vipassan? ?insight? and (...)
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  41. David Montalvo (2000). On the Propositional Treatment of Anatmavāda in Early Buddhism and Ātmavāda in Hinduism. Asian Philosophy 10 (3):205 – 212.score: 54.0
    As propositions, Anatmavāda and Ātmavāda are simply negations of one another. Thus whatever serves as a criterion for truth of the one must serve as a criterion for the other. When we treat them both as a priori propositions, I claim that we are unable to determine their truth value. But if we treat them both as a posteriori propositions, I argue, we are only able to determine their truth value if we attain unqualified omniscience. Because the (...)
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  42. Elias Capriles (2008). Heidegger's Misreception of Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:31-37.score: 54.0
    Heidegger attempted a “hermeneutics of human experience” that, by switching from the ontic to the ontological dimension, yet maintaining a phenomenological εποχη would bring to light the true meaning of being and, by the same stroke, ascertain the structures of being in human experience. It is now well known that Heidegger drew from Buddhism. However, in human experience being and its structures appear to be ultimately true, and since Heidegger at nopoint went beyond samsara, he failed to realize the (...)
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  43. Hiroshi Nemoto (2013). Who is a Proper Opponent? The Tibetan Buddhist Concept of Phyi Rgol Yang Dag. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (2):151-165.score: 54.0
    This paper examines the role of a proper opponent (phyi rgol yang dag) in debate from the standpoint of the Tibetan Buddhist theory of argumentation. A proper opponent is a person who is engaged in the process of truth-seeking. He is not a debater who undertakes to refute the tenets of a proponent. But rather, he is the model debater to whom a proponent can teach truth by using a probative argument in the most effective way. A proper (...)
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  44. Fumihiko Sueki (2008). Buddhist Philosophy of the Dead. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:259-265.score: 54.0
    Japanese Buddhism is sometimes called “funeral Buddhism” contemptuously. Buddhism is often criticized in that it serves only the dead and does not useful for the living. In truth, the main duties of Buddhist monks are to perform funeral services, maintain graves and perform memorial services for the dead in Japan today. Modern Buddhist leaders in Japan tried to argue against such criticism and insisted that Buddhism in origin was not a religion for the dead but (...)
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  45. Edward Fried (2014). The Buddhist Paradox of the Liar: A Quinian Defense of the Doctrine of Expedient Means. Philosophy East and West 64 (3):598-638.score: 54.0
    Mahāyāna Buddhism is the major branch of Buddhism practiced in India, China, and East Asia. A signal characteristic of this form of Buddhism is its advocacy of the “doctrine of expedient means.” This doctrine, which makes its first official appearance in the third century of the Common Era in the Lotus Sūtra (hereafter “the Sūtra”), is supposed to account for the fact that Mahāyāna Buddhism expresses views about the nature of reality and the goals of Buddhist (...)
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  46. Elias Capriles (2008). Hegel's Inversion of the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic View of History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:39-45.score: 54.0
    Hegel inverted the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic view of human spiritual and social evolution by presenting it as a progressive perfecting rather than as a progressive degeneration impelled by the gradual development of the basic human delusion called avidya (unawareness). Since he cancelled the crucial map /territory distinction, he had to explain change in nature as the negation of the immediately preceding state, and since he wanted spiritual and social evolution to be a process of perfecting, he had to (...)
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  47. Douglas S. Duckworth (2010). Two Models of the Two Truths: Ontological and Phenomenological Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (5):519-527.score: 46.0
    Mipam (‘ju mi pham rgya mtsho, 1846–1912), an architect of the Nyingma (rnying ma) tradition of Tibet in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, articulates two distinct models of the two truths that are respectively reflected in Madhyamaka and Yogācāra Buddhist traditions. The way he positions these two models sheds light on how levels of description are at play in his integration of these traditions. Mipam positions one kind of two-truth model as the product of an ontological analysis (...)
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  48. Steven Carlisle (2012). Creative Sincerity: Thai Buddhist Karma Narratives and the Grounding of Truths. Ethos 40 (3):317-340.score: 44.0
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  49. Alfonso Verdú (1985). Early Buddhist Philosophy in the Light of the Four Noble Truths. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 44.0
     
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  50. Bruno Contestabile (2010). On the Buddhist Truths and the Paradoxes in Population Ethics. Contemporary Buddhism 11 (1):103-113.score: 42.0
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