Search results for 'Truth Buddhism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  5
    Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. Kamala Kumari (1987). Notion of Truth in Buddhism and Pragmatism. Capital Pub. House.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. Raghunath Ghosh & Jyotish Chandra Basak (eds.) (2009). Language and Truth in Buddhism. Northern Book Centre.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    Sulak Sivaraksa (2001). The Sound of Liberating Truth: Buddhist-Christian Dialogues in Honor of Frederick J. Streng (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):129-130.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. The Cowherds (2011). Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. OUP Usa.
    In Moonshadows, the Cowherds, a team of ten scholars of Buddhist Studies, address the nature of conventional truth as it is understood in the Madhyamaka tradition deriving from Nagarjuna and Candrakarti. Moonshadows combines textual scholarship with philosophical analysis to elucidate the metaphysical, epistemological and ethical consequences of this doctrine.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6. Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.) (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The doctrine of the two truths--a conventional truth and an ultimate truth--is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools and is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. The fundamental ideas are articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd--3rd century CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another, and yet distinct. One of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7. T. J. F. Tillemans (2011). How Far Can a Mādhyamika Buddhist Reform Conventional Truth? Dismal Relativism, Fictionalism, Easy-Easy Truth, and the Alternatives. In Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.), Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press 151--165.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Tom Lowenstein (2011). Buddhist Inspirations: Essential Philosophy, Truth and Enlightenment. Watkins Publishing.
    Life and insights -- Wisdom's echoes -- Healing practices -- Sacred symbolism -- Spiritual cosmos.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  2
    Amy Donahue (2016). For the Cowherds: Coloniality and Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):597-617.
    Comparative philosophers have noted that some comparative methods perpetuate colonial legacies. What follows employs aspects of the scholarship of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Anîbal Quijano, and María Lugones to identify one colonially problematic methodology that some well-regarded contemporary comparative representations of “Buddhist Philosophy” arguably adopt. In 1995, Lin Tongqi, Henry Rosemont, Jr., and Roger Ames identified “the most fundamental methodological issue facing all comparativists” by raising and responding to the question: “Does the imposition of modern Western conceptual categories on non-Western patterns (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  40
    André van Der Braak (2010). Nietzsche and Japanese Buddhism on the Cultivation of the Body: To What Extent Does Truth Bear Incorporation? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):223-251.
    In order to overcome the unhealthy perspective of body-mind dualism and become capable of holding the “higher” and healthier perspective of body and mind as will to power, Nietzsche stresses that one must engage in a process of cultivation of the body. Such a practice of self-cultivation involves leaving behind incorporated illusory and life-denying perspectives and incorporating more “truthful” and affirmative perspectives on life. In this article, Nietzsche’s views on the body and its cultivation will be further explored and compared (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  12
    Noritoshi Aramaki (2007). A Critique of Whitehead in Light of the Buddhist Distinction of theTwo-Truth Doctrine. Process Studies 36 (2):294-305.
    We need to distinguish systematically what is culturally creative from the degenerative forces that now rule the world. Whitehead comes closest to defining the creative when he identifies it as freedom on the human side and peace on the divine. Buddhist meditation can go deeper to realize the zero-dimension of the communal life-as-such, which corresponds to Whiteheadean freedom-and-peace as the ultimate wellspring of cultural creativity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Francisco J. Varela & Bernhard Poerksen (2006). Truth is What Works : Francisco J. Varela on Cognitive Science, Buddhism, the Inseparability of Subject and Object, and the Exaggerations of Constructivism--A Conversation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (1):35-53.
  13.  9
    Chin Gail (1998). The Gender of Buddhist Truth. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 25:3-4.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  17
    Dale Wright (1986). Language and Truth in Hua-Yen Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (1):21-47.
  15.  15
    Jonathan C. Gold (2013). Review of The Cowherds, Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. [REVIEW] Sophia 52 (2):397-399.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  12
    Jeremy E. Henkel (2012). Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (3):428-429.
  17.  20
    Mark Siderits (1979). A Note on the Early Buddhist Theory of Truth. Philosophy East and West 29 (4):491-499.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  11
    John J. Holder (1996). The Early Buddhist Theory of Truth. International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):443-459.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  8
    Hsueh-Li Cheng (1981). Truth and Logic in San-Lun Mādhyamika Buddhism. International Philosophical Quarterly 21 (3):260-275.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  3
    R. Kimbrough (2005). Reading the Miraculous Powers of Japanese Poetry: Spells, Truth Acts, and a Medieval Buddhist Poetics of the Supernatural. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 32 (1):1-33.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    Gall Chin (1998). The Gender of Buddhist Truth: The Female Corpse in a Group of Japanese Paintings. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 25 (3-4):277-317.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    Roger J. Corless (1987). Can Buddhism Validate the Truth of God Incarnate? Modern Theology 3 (4):333-343.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Bruce Reichenbach (2010). Rethinking the Basis of Christian-Buddhist Dialogue: Understanding Metaphysical Realism and Nonrealism Issues. Philosophia Christi 12 (2):393-408.
    Interreligious dialogue presupposes that discourse functions the same for both parties. I argue that what makes Christian-Buddhist dialogue so difficult is that whereas Christians have a realist view of theoretical concepts, Buddhists generally do not. The evidence for this is varied, including the Buddha's own refusal to respond to metaphysical questions and the Buddhist constructionist view of reality. I reply to two objections, that Buddhists do conduct metaphysical debate, and that the Buddha adopted a correspondence rather than a pragmatic theory (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Jan Westerhoff (2011). The Merely Conventional Existence of the World. In Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.), Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    A platitude questioned by many Buddhist thinkers in India and Tibet is the existence of the world. We might be tempted to insert some modifier here, such as “substantial,” “self-existent,” or “intrinsically existent,” for, one might argue, these thinkers did not want to question the existence of the world tout court but only that of a substantial, self-existent, or otherwise suitably qualified world. But perhaps these modifiers are not as important as is generally thought, for the understanding of the world (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25. Guy Newland (1992). The Two Truths in the Mādhyamika Philosophy of the Ge-Luk-Ba Order of Tibetan Buddhism. Snow Lion Publications.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Ramsukhdas (2009). Discovery of Truth and Immortality. Gita Press.
  27.  39
    Bruce Reichenbach (2010). Religious Realism. In Melville Stewart (ed.), Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 1034--1052.
    In "Religious Realism," I trace the realism/nonrealism debate in religion, arguing that although religions are psychological and sociological phenomena, they make truth-claims about reality. I develop the epistemic religious nonrealism of Buddhism an contrast it with Christian realism, focusing particularly on Thomas Morris's treatment of the incarnation. In the end I argument that realism matters because of the content of religion, the importance of making truth claims, and for resolving the human predicament.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  5
    S. M. Amadae (2004). Nietzsche's Thirst For India. Idealistic Studies 34 (3):239-262.
    This essay represents a novel contribution to Nietzschean studies by combining an assessment of Friedrich Nietzsche’s challenging uses of “truth” and the “eternal return” with his insights drawn from Indian philosophies. Specifically, drawing on Martin Heidegger’s Nietzsche, I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of a static philosophy of being underpinning conceptual truth is best understood in line with the Theravada Buddhist critique of “self ” and “ego” as transitory. In conclusion, I find that Nietzsche’s “eternal return” can be understood (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Randall Studstill (2008). Buddhist Egoism and Other Infelicities. Ars Disputandi 8:1566-5399.
    This article is an evaluation of Christian views about Buddhism based on Paul Williams’ The Unexpected Way: On Converting from Buddhism to Catholicism . Studstill focuses specifically on five Christian claims about Buddhism: Buddhism prevents the recognition of objective reality and objective truth, Buddhism promotes egoism, Buddhism encourages immorality, Buddhism is quite possibly irrational, and Buddhism is excessively pessimistic. Studstill critically examines Williams’ defense of these claims and concludes that each is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Bronwyn Finnigan (2015). Madhyamaka Buddhist Meta-Ethics: Investigating the Justificatory Grounds of Moral Judgments. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):765-785.
    This paper investigates whether the metaphysical commitments of Madhyamaka Buddhism afford a satisfactory justificatory ground for moral judgments. Finnigan and Tanaka (2011a) argue that they do not. Their argument has since been challenged by Tillemans (2010-11), who alleges that both Svātantrika and Prāsaṅgika Mādhyamikas can readily justify moral judgments by respective appeal to the doctrine of the two truths. This paper shall contest this claim with respect to Prāsaṅgika Madhyamaka. It shall provide several arguments to show that Prāsaṅgika cannot (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  89
    Mark Siderits (2008). Paleo-Compatibilism and Buddhist Reductionism. Sophia 47 (1):29-42.
    Paleo-compatibilism is the view that the freedom required for moral responsibility is not incompatible with determinism about the factors relevant to moral assessment, since the claim that we are free and the claim that the psychophysical elements are causally determined are true in distinct and incommensurable ways. This is to be accounted for by appealing to the distinction between conventional truth and ultimate truth developed by Buddhist Reductionists. Paleo-compatibilists hold that the illusion of incompatibilism only arises when (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  5
    Douglas Duckworth (2014). How Nonsectarian is ‘Nonsectarian’?: Jorge Ferrer's Pluralist Alternative to Tibetan Buddhist Inclusivism. Sophia 53 (3):339-348.
    This paper queries the logic of the structure of hierarchical philosophical systems. Following the Indian tradition of siddhānta, Tibetan Buddhist traditions articulate a hierarchy of philosophical views. The ‘Middle Way’ philosophy or Madhyamaka—the view that holds that the ultimate truth is emptiness—is, in general, held to be the highest view in the systematic depictions of philosophies in Tibet, and is contrasted with realist schools of thought, Buddhist and non-Buddhist. But why should an antirealist or nominalist position be said to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. George Bosworth Burch (1972). Alternative Goals in Religion Love, Freedom, Truth. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    "Religions," Mahatma Gandhi once said, "are different roads converging to the same point." But in this stimulating assessment of Christianity, Buddhism, and Vedanta, Professor Burch develops the revolutionary theory that religions, starting from the same point, take divergent roads to different goals incompatible one with the other. Whereas Gandhi asks, "What does it matter that we take different roads so long as we reach the same goal?" Dr. Burch asks, "What does it matter that in taking different roads we (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Alfredo Aveline (2002). La visión budista de la cuestión cognitiva. Polis 3.
    El objetivo del presente texto es llegar a una descripción clara y comprensiva de la forma budista de abordar la cuestión cognitiva. La palabra cognición se refiere aquí al proceso por el cual se desenvuelve la convicción de que algo es "verdadero". El examen budista de la cognición puede, a su vez, ser encarado como una forma de buscar mayor libertad y distanciamiento frente a los pensamientos, opiniones y tendencias propios.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  17
    Dzogchen Ponlop (2011). Rebel Buddha: A Guide to a Revolution of Mind. Shambhala.
    Paperback reissue of Rebel Buddha: on the road to freedom.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  59
    Florin Deleanu (2010). Agnostic Meditations on Buddhist Meditation. Zygon 45 (3):605-626.
    I first attempt a taxonomy of meditation in traditional Indian Buddhism. Based on the main psychological or somatic function at which the meditative effort is directed, the following classes can be distinguished: (1) emotion-centered meditation (coinciding with the traditional samatha approach); (2) consciousness-centered meditation (with two subclasses: consciousness reduction/elimination and ideation obliteration); (3) reflection-centered meditation (with two subtypes: morality-directed reflection and reality-directed observation, the latter corresponding to the vipassanā method); (4) visualization-centered meditation; and (5) physiology-centered meditation. In the second (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37.  9
    Hiroshi Nemoto (2013). Who is a Proper Opponent? The Tibetan Buddhist Concept of Phyi Rgol Yang Dag. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (2):151-165.
    This paper examines the role of a proper opponent (phyi rgol yang dag) in debate from the standpoint of the Tibetan Buddhist theory of argumentation. A proper opponent is a person who is engaged in the process of truth-seeking. He is not a debater who undertakes to refute the tenets of a proponent. But rather, he is the model debater to whom a proponent can teach truth by using a probative argument in the most effective way. A proper (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Jay Garfield, Reductionism and Fictionalism Comments on Siderits' Personal Identity and Buddhist Philosophy.
    As a critic, I am in the unenviable position of agreeing with nearly all of what Mark does in this lucid, erudite and creative book. My comments will hence not be aimed at showing what he got wrong, as much as an attempt from a Madhyamaka point of view to suggest another way of seeing things, in particular another way of seeing how one might think of how Madhyamaka philosophers, such as Någårjuna and Candrak¥rti, see conventional truth, our engagement (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  39
    Tao Jin (2013). What It Means to Interpret: A Standard Formulation and its Implicit Corollaries in Chinese Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 63 (2):153-175.
    In the study of the Buddhist practice of scriptural interpretation, an inevitable subject of inquiry, apart from the content of interpretation, is the act of interpretation itself. Such an inquiry may naturally go in two different directions, looking at either the theories of interpretation or the theories about interpretation. The theories of interpretation guide the understanding and retrieval of meaning, and the theories about interpretation explore instead the nature or, more specifically, the role of interpretation in the transmission of (...). In other words, of these two directions the former asks how one interprets and the latter what it means to interpret.In Western studies of Buddhism over the past few .. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Elliot R. Wolfson (2006). Alef, Mem, Tau: Kabbalistic Musings on Time, Truth, and Death. University of California Press.
    This highly original, provocative, and poetic work explores the nexus of time, truth, and death in the symbolic world of medieval kabbalah. Demonstrating that the historical and theoretical relationship between kabbalah and western philosophy is far more intimate and extensive than any previous scholar has ever suggested, Elliot R. Wolfson draws an extraordinary range of thinkers such as Frederic Jameson, Martin Heidegger, Franz Rosenzweig, William Blake, Julia Kristeva, Friedrich Schelling, and a host of kabbalistic figures into deep conversation with (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  5
    Paul Williams (1991). Some Dimensions of the Recent Work of Raimundo Panikkar: A Buddhist Perspective1: Paul Williams. Religious Studies 27 (4):511-521.
    The Dalai Lama is fond of quoting a statement in which the Buddha is said to have asserted that no one should accept his word out of respect for the Buddha himself, but only after testing it, analysing it ‘ as a goldsmith analyses gold, through cutting, melting, scraping and rubbing it’. The Dalai Lama is often referred to as the temporal and spiritual leader of Tibet, but in truth as a spiritual figure His Holiness, while respected, indeed revered (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  24
    David Loy (1996). Beyond Good and Evil? A Buddhist Critique of Nietzsche. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):37 – 57.
    Abstract In what ways was Nietzsche right, from a Buddhist perspective, and where did he go wrong? Nietzsche understood how the distinction we make between this world and a higher spiritual realm serves our need for security, and he saw the bad faith in religious values motivated by this need. He did not perceive how his alternative, more aristocratic values, also reflects the same anxiety. Nietzsche realised how the search for truth is motivated by a sublimated desire for symbolic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  40
    Hans-Rudolf Kantor (2011). 'Right Words Are Like the Reverse'—The Daoist Rhetoric and the Linguistic Strategy in Early Chinese Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 20 (3):283-307.
    ?Right words are like the reverse? is the concluding remark of chap. 78 in the Daoist classic Daodejing. Quoted in treatises composed by Seng Zhao (374?414), it designates the linguistic strategy used to unfold the Buddhist Madhyamaka meaning of ?emptiness? and ?ultimate truth?. In his treatise Things Do not Move, Seng Zhao demonstrates that ?motion and stillness? are not really contradictory, performing the deconstructive meaning of Buddhist ?emptiness? via the corresponding linguistic strategy. Though the topic of the discussion and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  35
    John Schroeder (2011). Truth, Deception, and Skillful Means in the Lotus Sūtra. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):35-52.
    This article seeks to broaden contemporary scholarship on the Lotus S?tra by arguing that it is a philosophically critical, self-reflective text struggling with problems of truth in Buddhist discourse. While all Lotus S?tra scholars agree that the doctrine of skillful means is a central teaching in the text, there is a common tendency to frame skillful means as a passive vehicle (or ?means?) for expressing truth rather than an active philosophical critique of truth. This article argues that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  20
    Richard P. Hayes (1988). Principled Atheism in the Buddhist Scholastic Tradition. Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (1):5-28.
    The doctrine that there is no permanent creator who superintends creation and takes care of his creatures accords quite well with each of the principles known as the four noble truths of Buddhism. The first truth, that distress is universal, is traditionally expounded in terms of the impermanence of all features of experience and in terms of the absence of genuine unity or personal identity in the multitude of physical and mental factors that constitute what we experience as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  5
    Elias Capriles (2008). Hegel's Inversion of the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic View of History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:39-45.
    Hegel inverted the Tantric Buddhist, Bönpo and Stoic view of human spiritual and social evolution by presenting it as a progressive perfecting rather than as a progressive degeneration impelled by the gradual development of the basic human delusion called avidya (unawareness). Since he cancelled the crucial map /territory distinction, he had to explain change in nature as the negation of the immediately preceding state, and since he wanted spiritual and social evolution to be a process of perfecting, he had to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    Paul J. Griffiths (1982). Notes Towards a Critique of Buddhist Karmic Theory. Religious Studies 18 (3):277 - 291.
    Western Buddhology, the responsible scholarly study of Buddhist languages, history and ideas, is now more than a century and a half old. For most of that time scholars working in this field have been primarily concerned to understand and expound their sources, not to criticize or assess the views found therein, much less to make any attempt at deciding whether the central views of Buddhist philosophers are likely to be true statements of the way things are. There are good reasons (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48.  6
    Fumihiko Sueki (2008). Buddhist Philosophy of the Dead. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:259-265.
    Japanese Buddhism is sometimes called “funeral Buddhism” contemptuously. Buddhism is often criticized in that it serves only the dead and does not useful for the living. In truth, the main duties of Buddhist monks are to perform funeral services, maintain graves and perform memorial services for the dead in Japan today. Modern Buddhist leaders in Japan tried to argue against such criticism and insisted that Buddhism in origin was not a religion for the dead but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  15
    R. K. Payne (1987). The Theory of Meaning in Buddhist Logicians: The Historical and Intellectual Context of Apoha. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (3):261-284.
    These supporting concepts enable us to much more adequately understand the meaning of apoha. First, a sharp distinction is drawn between the real and the conceptual; the real is particular, unique, momentary and the basis of perception, while the conceptual is universal, general, only supposedly objective and the basis of language. Second, the complex nature of negation discloses the kind of negation meant by apoha. Negation by implication is seen as disclosing the necessary relation between simple affirmations and simple negations. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    Elias Capriles (2008). Heidegger's Misreception of Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:31-37.
    Heidegger attempted a “hermeneutics of human experience” that, by switching from the ontic to the ontological dimension, yet maintaining a phenomenological εποχη would bring to light the true meaning of being and, by the same stroke, ascertain the structures of being in human experience. It is now well known that Heidegger drew from Buddhism. However, in human experience being and its structures appear to be ultimately true, and since Heidegger at nopoint went beyond samsara, he failed to realize the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000