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  1. Tuija Takala (2010). Guest Editorial: Introduction to Philosophical Issues in Neuroethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):161-.
    Neuroethics studies the ethical, social, and legal issues raised by actual or expected advances in neuroscience. The relevant fields in neuroscience include, but are not limited to, neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychopharmacology, neurogenetics, and neuropsychiatry. For many, neuroethics is best understood as a subcategory of bioethics, and although not all agree, for the purposes of the present collection of articles, this definition is assumed. Although bioethics as a field of study started in the early 1970s as a normative enterprise, mainly practiced (...)
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  2. Tuija Takala (2007). Designer Babies and Treating People as a Means. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:245-249.
    Among the many ethical problems brought about by the latest developments in medical sciences is the possibility of creating "designer" babies. In this paper I will look at one such a case from the viewpoint of the Kantian "humanity principle". The various aspects of treating people as a means that can be brought up in discussions about "designer" babies are scrutinised. These will obviously include treating the future child as a mere means, but the proper role of the mother and (...)
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  3. Tuija Takala (2007). Respect for Autonomy and the Two Concepts of Liberty. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:69-72.
    In this paper I will study the theoretical foundations of autonomy and argue that many of the disputes around the principle follow from different understandings of what is "true freedom." My analysis will center on the two notions of liberty introduced by Isaiah Berlin in his "Two Concepts of Liberty" (originally published in 1959). The problem is that there is no unequivocal way to understand the division. In my paper, I will give one interpretation of Berlin's two concepts, and argue (...)
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  4. Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry (2007). Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position. Bioethics 21 (3):150–159.
    This paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law’s scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute and qualified (...)
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  5. Matti Häyry, Jukka Takala, Piia Jallinoja, Salla Lötjönen & Tuija Takala (2006). Ethicalization in Bioscience—A Pilot Study in Finland. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (03):282-284.
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  6. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (2005). Human Dignity, Bioethics, and Human Rights. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):225–233.
  7. Matti Hayry & Tuija Takala (2005). Human Dignity, Bioethics, and Human Rights. Developing World Bioethics 5 (3):225-233.
  8. Tuija Takala (2005). Demagogues, Firefighters, and Window Dressers: Who Are We and What Should We Be? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (4):385-388.
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  9. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (2004). Dissecting Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (01):3-5.
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  10. Pekka Louhiala & Tuija Takala (2004). Healthcare Ethics in Finland: A Follow-Up. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (03):236-240.
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  11. Tuija Takala (2004). The (Im)Morality of (Un)Naturalness. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (01):15-19.
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  12. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (eds.) (2003). Scratching the Surface of Bioethics. Rodopi.
    WHAT IS BIOETHICS ALL ABOUT? A START Matti Hayry and Tuija Takala. A Start What is bioethics all about? Is it only about medicine, nursing, and healthcare? ...
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  13. Tuija Takala (2003). Utilitarianism Shot Down by Its Own Men? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (04):447-454.
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  14. Tuija Takala & Pekka Louhiala (2003). Healthcare Ethics in Finland. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (03):256-260.
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  15. Tuija Takala (2002). Justice for All? The Scandinavian Approach. In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. Oup Usa. 183.
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  16. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (2001). Genetic Information, Rights, and Autonomy. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):403-414.
    Rights, autonomy, privacy, and confidentialityare concepts commonly used in discussionsconcerning genetic information. When theseconcepts are thought of as denoting absolutenorms and values which cannot be overriden byother considerations, conflicts among themnaturally occur.In this paper, these and related notions areexamined in terms of the duties and obligationsmedical professionals and their clients canhave regarding genetic knowledge. It issuggested that while the prevailing idea ofautonomy is unhelpful in the analysis of theseduties, and the ensuing rights, an alternativereading of personal self-determination canprovide a firmer (...)
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  17. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (eds.) (2001). The Future of Value Inquiry. Rodopi.
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  18. Tuija Takala (2001). Genetic Ignorance and Reasonable Paternalism. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):485-491.
    The question concerning an individual''s rightto remain in ignorance regarding her owngenetic makeup is central to debates aboutgenetic information. Whatever is decided onthis matter has a weighty bearing on all of therelated third-party issues, such as whetherfamily members or employers should be toldabout an individual''s genetic makeup. Thosearguing that no right to genetic ignoranceexists tend to argue from a viewpoint I havecalled in this paper reasonablepaternalism. It is an appealing position whichrests on widely shared intuitions on reasonablechoices, but which, in (...)
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  19. Tuija Takala (2001). What Is Wrong with Global Bioethics? On the Limitations of the Four Principles Approach. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):72-77.
    Within the latter half of the 30-year history of bioethics there has been an increasing pressure to address bioethical issues globally. Bioethics is not traditionally a theory-based enterprise, rather the focus has been problem related. With the introduction of the global perspective, theory has, however, become more important. One of the best known, probably the best known, theory of bioethics is the one presented by Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress in their PrinciplesofBiomedicalEthics in 1979. This theory is known (...)
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  20. Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry (2000). Genetic Ignorance, Moral Obligations and Social Duties. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (1):107 – 113.
    In a contribution to The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy , Professor Rosamond Rhodes argues that individuals sometimes have an obligation to know about their genetic disorders, because this is required by their status as autonomous persons. Her analysis, which is based on Kant's concept of autonomy and Aristotle's notion of friendship, is extended here to consequentialist concerns. These are of paramount importance if, as we believe and Professor Rhodes herself implies, the Kantian and Aristotelian doctrines can be helpful only (...)
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  21. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (1999). Biotechnology and the Environment. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:169-178.
    Rights can be founded in a variety of ethical systems—e.g., on natural law, on the duties postulated by deontological ethics, and on the consequences of our actions. The concept of risk we will outline supports a theory of rights which provides at least individual human beings with the entitlement not to be harmed by the environmental impacts of biotechnology. The analysis can, we believe, also be extended to the rights of animals as well as ecosystems, both of which can be (...)
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  22. Tuija Takala (1999). The Right to Genetic Ignorance Confirmed. Bioethics 13 (3-4):288-293.
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