Search results for 'Tzu-Hua Hoo' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Tzu-Hua Hoo (1949). M-Valued Sub-System of (M+N)-Valued Propositional Calculus. Journal of Symbolic Logic 14 (3):177-181.
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  2. A. R. Turquette (1950). Review: Tzu-Hua Hoo, $M$-Valued Sub-System of $(M + N)$-Valued Propositional Calculus. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 14 (4):261-261.
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  3. A. R. Turquette (1950). Hoo Tzu-Hua. M-Valued Sub-System of -Valued Propositional Calculus. Journal of Symbolic Logic 14 (4):261.
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  4. Sun Tzu (1996). Sun Tzu: Art of War. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Like Machiavelli's The Prince and the Japanese Book of Five Rings, Sun Tzu's The Art of War is as timely for business people today as it was for military strategists in ancient China. Written in China more than 2,000 years ago, Sun Tzu's classic The Art of War is the first known study of the planning and conduct of military operations. These terse, aphoristic essays are unsurpassed in comprehensiveness and depth of understanding, examining not only battlefield maneuvers, but also relevant (...)
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  5.  1
    W. K. Liao & Han Fei Tzu (1961). The Complete Works of Han Fei Tzu. A Classic of Chinese Political Science. Vol. II. Philosophy East and West 11 (3):165-167.
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  6.  1
    Wang Yu-min Yang Xian Hua (2002). Yang Xian-Hua Philosophical Concern on the Theory of Labor-Value [J]. Modern Philosophy 4:006.
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  7.  1
    Mai-mai Sze (1957). The Tao of Painting: A Study of the Ritual Disposition of Chinese Painting, with a Translation of the "Chieh Tzŭ Yüan Hua Chuan," or Mustard Seed Garden Manual of Painting, 1679-1701. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (2):279-281.
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  8.  1
    Shen Yu-Ting (1979). On Appraisal of the Kung-Sun Lung Tzu. Contemporary Chinese Thought 10 (3):20-27.
    The academic confusion caused by the "gang of four" was prominently manifested in the history of Chinese philosophy. The history of Chinese logic was also affected by the confusion. Now the "gang of four" has been smashed after a merciless trial by history. Under the leadership of Chairman Hua and the Party Central Committee, scientific research has begun to make a long stride ahead. Therefore, it is possible to conduct scientific investigations and thorough discussions on a series of issues in (...)
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  9. Thomas A. Metzger, Tung-lan Huang, Hua Kao, Tzu-K. O. Mo & Shih-an Yen (1995). Pai T o K Un Ching Hsin Ju Hsüeh Yü Chung-Kuo Cheng Chih Wen Hua Ti Yen Chin.
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  10. Wei-Ming Tu, Wen-Chang Chou, Ting Shan & Yu-hua Ts ao (1996). Ju Chia Ssu Hsiang Hsin Lun Ch Uang Tsao Hsing Chuan Huan Ti Tzu Wo.
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  11.  14
    Lao Tzu & Laozi (2012). Tao Te Ching: An All-New Translation. Shambhala Publications.
    Previously published: Tokyo: Kodansha International, 2010.
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  12.  11
    Lao Tzu & David Bowie (2003). Straw Men and Diamond Dogs. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (2):86-94.
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  13.  22
    Ying Hua & Xiaodi Yang (2007). Case Study of Lafarge China and Shui On Cement. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:129-143.
    The cement industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries and among the largest CO2 emitters. Cement industry emissions in China have attracted particular attention, due to the country’s rapid growth. Yet few local Chinese cement companies have corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, and even fewer have environmentally related CSR programs. This paper studies the environmentally related CSR practices in mainland China of two companies: Lafarge, a multinational cement company, and Shui On, a Hong Kong-based construction company and developer. We (...)
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  14.  5
    Chuang Tzu (2003). Heidegger—The Taoists—Kierkegaard. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30:81-97.
  15.  4
    Austin T. Thiel, Jing Huang, Ming Lei & Xianxin Hua (2012). Menin as a Hub Controlling Mixed Lineage Leukemia. Bioessays 34 (9):771-780.
  16.  3
    A. P. Rudell & J. Hua (1996). The Recognition Potential and Conscious Awareness. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 98:309-318.
  17.  5
    Lien Chao Tzu (1928). Some New Factors That Affect the Old Values of the Chinese Family. International Journal of Ethics 38 (3):341-350.
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  18.  3
    Ying Hua & Xiaodi Yang (2007). Case Study of Lafarge China and Shui On Cement: Emission-Related CSR in the Chinese Cement Industry. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:129-143.
    The cement industry is one of the most energy-intensive industries and among the largest CO2 emitters. Cement industry emissions in China have attracted particular attention, due to the country’s rapid growth. Yet few local Chinese cement companies have corporate social responsibility programs, and even fewer have environmentally related CSR programs. This paper studies the environmentally related CSR practices in mainland China of two companies: Lafarge, a multinational cement company, and Shui On, a Hong Kong-based construction company and developer. We are (...)
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  19.  9
    Steven O. Kimbrough & Hua Hua (1991). On Nonmonotonic Reasoning with the Method of Sweeping Presumptions. Minds and Machines 1 (4):393-416.
    Reasoning almost always occurs in the face of incomplete information. Such reasoning is nonmonotonic in the sense that conclusions drawn may later be withdrawn when additional information is obtained. There is an active literature on the problem of modeling such nonmonotonic reasoning, yet no category of method-let alone a single method-has been broadly accepted as the right approach. This paper introduces a new method, called sweeping presumptions, for modeling nonmonotonic reasoning. The main goal of the paper is to provide an (...)
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  20.  1
    Wei Hua (1978). Socialist Revolution and Inner-Party Line Struggle. Contemporary Chinese Thought 10 (2):16-25.
    Historical experience demonstrates that triumphant development of the cause of proletarian revolution depends on the correctness and soundness of the Party's political line. Basically, the continuous sequence of victories of China's proletarian revolutionary cause is the result of the continuity between Chairman Mao's Marxist-Leninist line and the triumphant suppression of the Right and "Left" opportunistic lines. In guiding the course of China's revolution, our exceptionally great teacher and leader Chairman Mao, from the beginning placed comprehensive emphasis on the problem of (...)
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  21.  1
    Hsiao Hua (1971). With Mao Tse-Tung Thought as Our Guide, Carry on Living Ideological Education. Contemporary Chinese Thought 3 (1):19-43.
    This August 1 is the thirty-sixth anniversary of the founding of the Chinese People's Liberation Army. For thirty-six years, under the leadership of the Party Central Committee and Comrade Mao Tse-tung, the Chinese People's Liberation Army has developed into a people's army possessing a high degree of political consciousness and a strong fighting capability. It has carried out well its glorious duties of protecting the homeland, protecting the labor of the people, protecting the social order, and defending the socialist system.
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  22.  2
    J. Hu, R. Chen, S. Wu, J. Tang, G. Leng, I. Kunnamo, Z. Yang, W. Wang, X. Hua, Y. Zhang, Y. Xie & S. Zhan (2013). The Quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines in China: A Systematic Assessment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):961-967.
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  23. Shiping Hua (1995). Scientism and Humanism: Two Cultures in Post-Mao China (1978-1989). State University of New York Press.
    This book is a study of the transformation of Chinese political consciousness during the post-Mao era.
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  24. Hsüan Hua (ed.) (2005). Secrets of the Five Elements: Age-Old Treasures From China. Buddhist Text Translation Society.
  25. Shan Hua (2008). Zhong Gu Si Xiang Shi Lun Ji. Xue Yuan Chu Ban She.
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  26. Wei-Dong Jiang, Da-Wei Niu, Yun Hua & Feng Qi (2012). Generalizations of Hermite-Hadamard Inequality to N-Time Differentiable Functions Which Are s-Convex in the Second Sense. Analysis 32 (3):209-220.
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  27. Lao Tzu (1993). An Excerpt From The. The Chesterton Review 19 (3):413-413.
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  28. Chuang Tzu, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz & Ears To See (2002). Masato Mitsuda. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29:119-133.
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  29. Robert E. Allinson (1989). Chuang-Tzu for Spiritual Transformation an Analysis of the Inner Chapters. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    This book offers a fundamentally new interpretation of the philosophy of the Chuang-Tzu. It is the first full-length work of its kind which argues that a deep level cognitive structure exists beneath an otherwise random collection of literary anecdotes, cryptic sayings, and dark allusions. The author carefully analyzes myths, legends, monstrous characters, paradoxes, parables and linguistic puzzles as strategically placed techniques for systematically tapping and channeling the spiritual dimensions of the mind. Allinson takes issue with commentators who have treated the (...)
     
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  30.  39
    Robert E. Allinson (2003). On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
    The common understanding of Chuang-Tzu as one of the earliest deconstructionists is only half true. This article sets out to challenge conventional characterizations of Chuang-Tzu by adding the important caveat that not only is he a philosophical deconstructionist but that his writings also reveal a non-relativistic, transcendental basis to understanding. The road to such understanding, as argued by this author, can be found in Chuang-Tzu’s emphasis on the illusory or dream-like nature of the self and, by extension, the subject-object dichotomy (...)
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  31.  79
    Robert E. Allinson (1989). On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu. Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
    This article offers a meta-analysis of contemporary approaches aimed at resolving the internal, relativistic-non-relativistic tension within the text of the Chuang-Tzu. In the first section, the four most commonly applied approaches are unpacked and evaluated, ranging from relativistic approaches such as hard relativism and soft relativism, to approaches that acknowledge both relativism and non-relativism, as well as others which acknowledge neither of the two perspectives (relativism and non-relativism). After demonstrating the immanent difficulties these four types of approaches encounter, the latter (...)
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  32.  39
    Robert E. Allinson (1998). The Debate Between Mencius and Hsün-Tzu: Contemporary Applications. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):31-49.
    This article takes one of the richest historical debates, that of Hsun-Tzu and Mencius, as the contextual starting-point for the elaboration of human goodness. In support of Mencius, this article develops additional metaphysical and bio-social-evolutionary grounds, both of which parallel each other. The metaphysical analysis suggests that, in the spirit of Spinoza, an entity’s nature must necessarily include the drive toward its preservation. Likewise, the multi-faceted bio-social-evolutionary argument locates the fundamental telos of humanity in the preservation of social ties and (...)
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  33.  8
    Robert Allinson (1998). Review of I and Tao: Martin Buber's Encounter with Chuang Tzu by Jonathan R. Herman. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 48 (3):529-534.
    This review confirms Herman’s work as a praiseworthy contribution to East-West and comparative philosophical literature. Due credit is given to Herman for providing English readers with access to Buber’s commentary on, a personal translation of, the Chuang-Tzu; Herman’s insight into the later influence of I and Thou on Buber’s understanding of Chuang-Tzu and Taoism is also appropriately commended. In latter half of this review, constructive criticisms of Herman’s work are put forward, such as formatting inconsistencies, a tendency toward verbosity and (...)
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  34.  13
    Blaine McCormick (2001). Make Money, Not War: A Brief Critique of Sun Tzu's the Art of War. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):285 - 286.
    Sun Tzu''s text of The Art of War remains a bestsellingand oft-referenced practioner''s book. However, its generalizabilityto the current business environment is questionable. This reviewexamines two central tenets of the book – warfare anddeception – and critiques their relevance in lightof current business practice.
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  35. Robert Elliott Allinson (2007). Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  36.  10
    Steve Odin (1982). Process Metaphysics and Hua-Yen Buddhism: : A Critical Study of Cumulative Penetration Vs. Interpenetration. Suny Press.
    Abbreviations Works by Alfred North Whitehead 1) Adventures of Ideas. New York: Macmillan Co., 1967 AI 2) Concept of Nature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971 CN 3) Modes of Thought. New York: Macmillan Co., 1968 MT 4) Process ..
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  37.  2
    Naomi Quinn (2004). Psychodynamic Universals, Cultural Particulars in Feminist Anthropology: Rethinking Hua Gender Beliefs. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 32 (4):493-513.
  38. Shunping Hu (2007). "Fa Hua Jing" Zhi Si Xiang Nei Han. Wan Juan Lou Tu Shu Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  39.  1
    Burton Watson (ed.) (1996). Chuang Tzu: Basic Writings. Columbia University Press.
    The basic writings of Chuang Tzu have been savored by Chinese readers for over two thousand years. And Burton Watson's lucid and beautiful translation has been loved by generations of readers. Chuang Tzu was a leading philosopher representing the Taoist strain in Chinese thought. Using parable and anecdote, allegory and paradox, he set forth, in the book that bears his name, the early ideas of what was to become the Taoist school. Central to these is the belief that only by (...)
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  40. Francis Cook (1977). Hua-Yen Buddhism: The Jewel Net of Indra. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Hua-yen is regarded as the highest form of Buddhism by most modern Japanese and Chinese scholars. This book is a description and analysis of the Chinese form of Buddhism called Hua-yen, Flower Ornament, based largely on one of the more systematic treatises of its third patriarch. Hua-yen Buddhism strongly resembles Whitehead's process philosophy, and has strong implications for modern philosophy and religion. Hua-yen Buddhism explores the philosophical system of Hua-yen in greater detail than does Garma C.C. Chang's _The Buddhist Teaching (...)
     
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  41.  92
    JeeLoo Liu, Tian-Tai Metaphysics Vs. Hua-Yan Metaphysics.
    Tian-tai Buddhism and Hua-yan Buddhism can be viewed as the two most philosophically important schools in Chinese Buddhism. The Tian-tai school was founded by Zhi-yi (Chih-i) (538-597 A.D.). The major Buddhist text endorsed by this school is the Lotus Sutra, short for “the Sutra of the Lotus Blossom of the Subtle Dharma.” Hua-yan Buddhism derived its name from the Hua-yan Sutra, translated as “The Flower Ornament Scripture” or as “The Flowery Splendor Scripture.”1 The founder of the Hua-yan school was a (...)
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  42.  9
    Xiajun Hu & Jing Guo (2011). Evil Human Nature: From the Perspectives of St. Augustineand Hsun Tzu. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):61.
    The view of evil human nature is important in Chinese and western cultures. The thesis chooses evil human in St. Augustine’s thoughts and Hsun Tzu’s thoughts to compare and analyze evil in these two. St. Augustine, who is called “the Saint of God”, views the definition of evil, the resource of it, and salvations of it from the aspect of religious beliefs. He considers that evil is the privation of goodness and is not created by God. Because God is omnipotent (...)
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  43.  12
    Hu Xiajun & Guo Jing (2011). Evil Human Nature: From the Perspectives of St. Augustineand Hsun Tzu. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):61.
    The view of evil human nature is important in Chinese and western cultures. The thesis chooses evil human in St. Augustine’s thoughts and Hsun Tzu’s thoughts to compare and analyze evil in these two. St. Augustine, who is called “the Saint of God”, views the definition of evil, the resource of it, and salvations of it from the aspect of religious beliefs. He considers that evil is the privation of goodness and is not created by God. Because God is omnipotent (...)
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  44.  32
    Peter R. Moody (1979). The Legalism of Han Fei-Tzu and Its Affinities with Modern Political Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 19 (3):317-330.
    The legalism of han fei-Tzu has affinities with much of modern political thought, Particularly in its denial of an objective morality. Because legalism is modernism unmoralized, It shows clearly some of the less savory implications of the truisms we accept. Han fei's ideas are interesting in their own right, But it is also interesting to see these ideas in a comparative setting, That we might gain a broader understanding of modern political thought, Both of its merits and its limitations.
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  45.  16
    S. K. Wertz (2007). The Five Flavors and Taoism: Lao Tzu's Verse Twelve. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):251 – 261.
    In verse twelve of the Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu makes a curious claim about the five flavors; namely that they cause people not to taste or that they jade the palate. The five flavors are: sweet, sour, salt, bitter and spicy or hot as in 'heat'. To the Western mind, the claim, 'The five flavors cause them [persons] to not taste,' is counterintuitive; on the contrary, the presence of the five flavors in a dish or in a meal would (...)
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  46.  21
    Kristopher Duda (2001). Reconsidering Mo Tzu on the Foundations of Morality. Asian Philosophy 11 (1):23 – 31.
    Dennis Ahern and David Soles raise substantial problems for the conventional interpretation of Mo Tzu as a utilitarian. Although they defend different interpretations, both scholars agree that Mo Tzu is committed to a divine command theory in some form, citing the same key passages where, supposedly, Mo Tzu explicitly endorses the divine command theory. In this paper, I defend the orthodox interpretation, insisting that Mo Tzu is a utilitarian. I show that the passages cited by Ahern and Soles do not (...)
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  47.  62
    Irving Goh (2011). Chuang Tzu's Becoming-Animal. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):110-133.
    Hui Tzu said to Chuang Tzu, “. . .Your words ... are too big and useless, and so everyone alike spurns them!”Chuang Tzu said, “Maybe you’ve never seen a wildcat or a weasel. It crouches down and hides, watching for something to come along. It leaps and races east and west, not hesitating to go high or low—until it falls into the trap and dies in the net. Then again there’s the yak, big as a cloud covering the sky. It (...)
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  48.  7
    Thomas Cleary (1983). Entry Into the Inconceivable: An Introduction to Hua-Yen Buddhism. University of Hawai'i Press.
    Introduction IN RECENT YEARS there has developed in the West considerable interest in the philosophy of Hua-yen Buddhism, a holistic, Unitarian approach to ...
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  49.  25
    Linhe Han (2000). Chuang Tzu Compared With the Early Wittgenstein. Grazer Philosophische Studien 58:297-329.
    The early Wittgentein talked a lot about what is the mystical and hinted that these are the most important things for him. But it is anything but an easy task to make sense of his talks on this subject. And some commentators even claim that it is impossible to do this. It shall be shown that we could understand the early Wittgenstein better if we had some knowledge of the thought of Chuang Tzu, a leading classical Chinese Taoist philosopher. For (...)
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  50.  12
    Mark McNeilly (1997). Sun Tzu and the Art of Business: Six Strategic Principles for Managers. OUP USA.
    To hand down the wisdom he had gained from years of battles, more than two millenia ago the famous Chinese general Sun Tzu wrote the classic work on military strategy, The Art of War. Because business, like warfare, is dynamic, fast-paced, and requires an effective and efficient use of scarce resources, modern executives have found value in Sun Tzu's teachings. But The Art of War is arranged for the military leader and not the CEO, so making connections between ancient warfare (...)
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