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Ute Deichmann [20]U. Deichmann [16]
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Profile: Ute Deichmann
  1. Ute Deichmann (2013). Crystals, Colloids, or Molecules?: Early Controversies About the Origin of Life and Synthetic Life. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (4):521-542.
    In Goethe's Faust, the poet refers to alchemists' widespread ideas on artificial creation of life in the laboratory. In Faust, such an attempt was not successful: the little man,Homunculus, created by the scholar Wagner through crystallization, was a pure spirit; his form and light disappeared in an attempt to become real life. According to Goethe, life was obviously not a crystal, and he pointed to decisive differences between crystals and organic beings, the latter for example elaborating their food into clear-cut (...)
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  2. Ute Deichmann, Michel Morange & Anthony S. Travis (2013). Editors' Introduction to Special Issue. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (4):470-472.
    In this second decade of the 21st century, we find the pervasive influence of synthetic biology everywhere, not only in research laboratories, but also in the discourses of politicians and ethicists. Despite its ubiquity, the precise meaning of the notions of "synthetic biology" and "synthetic life," as well as their history, potential, and risks, remain obscure not only to the layperson, but also to most biologists.The aim of this special issue is twofold. First, it is intended to help the reader (...)
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  3. Rony Armon, Ulrich Charpa, Eric Davidson, Ute Deichmann, Raphael Falk, John Glass, Shimon Glick, Manfred Laubichler, Michel Morange, Isaac, Addy Pross, Siegfried Roth & Varda Shoshan-Barmatz (2012). Final Discussion: Issues and Challenges for the Future. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (4):608-611.
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  4. Rony Armon, Ulrich Charpa, Eric Davidson, Ute Deichmann, Raphael Falk, John Glass, Shimon Glick, Manfred Laubichler, Michel Morange & Isaac Yanni Nevo (2012). Final Discussion: Issues and Challenges for the Future. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (4):608-611.
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  5. Ute Deichmann (2012). Beyond Popper and Polanyi: Leonor Michaelis, a Critical and Passionate Pioneer of Research at the Interface of Medicine, Enzymology, and Physical Chemistry. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 55 (4):612-626.
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  6. U. Deichmann & M. Morange (2011). The Origin of Life: Scientific, Historical and Philosophical Perspective. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 34 (3):337-339.
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  7. Ute Deichmann (2010). Gemmules and Elements: On Darwin's and Mendel's Concepts and Methods in Heredity. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (1):85-112.
    Inheritance and variation were a major focus of Charles Darwin’s studies. Small inherited variations were at the core of his theory of organic evolution by means of natural selection. He put forward a developmental theory of heredity (pangenesis) based on the assumption of the existence of material hereditary particles. However, unlike his proposition of natural selection as a new mechanism for evolutionary change, Darwin’s highly speculative and contradictory hypotheses on heredity were unfruitful for further research. They attempted to explain many (...)
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  8. Ute Deichmann & Anthony S. Travis (2010). Special Section: Darwinism and Scientific Practice in Historical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (1):55-60.
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  9. Ute Deichmann (2009). Chemistry and the Engineering of Life Around 1900: Research and Reflections by Jacques Loeb. Biological Theory 4 (4):323-332.
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  10. Ulrich Charpa & Ute Deichmann (eds.) (2007). Jews and Sciences in German Contexts: Case Studies From the 19th and 20th Centuries. Mohr Siebeck.
    Problems, Phenomena, Explanatory Approaches Who is a German-Jewish Scientist? 1. The Einstein case and its paradoxes On 14 March 1929, Albert Einstein's ...
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  11. U. Deichmann (2002). Emigration, Isolation and the Slow Start of Molecular Biology in Germany. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (3):449-471.
    Until the 1930s Germany had been the international leader in biochemistry, chemistry, and areas of biology. After WWII, however, molecular biology as a new interdisciplinary scientific enterprise was scarcely represented in Germany for almost 20 years. Three major reasons for the low performance of molecular biology are discussed: first, the forced emigration of Jewish scientists after 1933, which not only led to the expulsion of future distinguished molecular biologists, but also to a strong decline of ''dynamic biochemistry'', a field which (...)
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  12. Ute Deichmann (1999). The Expulsion of Jewish Biochemists From Academia in Nazi Germany. Perspectives on Science 7 (1):1-86.
    : In contrast to anti-Jewish campaigns at German universities in the 19th century, which met with opposition from liberal scholars, among them prominent chemists, there was no public reaction to the dismissals in 1933. Germany had been an international leader in (bio-)chemistry until the 1930s. Due to a high proportion of Jewish physicists, (bio-)chemistry was strongly affected by the expulsion of scientists. Organic and inorganic chemistry were least affected, while biochemistry suffered most. Polymer chemistry and quantum chemistry, of minor importance (...)
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  13. Ute Deichmann (1999). The Expulsion of Jewish Chemists and Biochemists From Academia in Nazi Germany. Perspectives on Science 7 (1):1-86.
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